12

How to implement an abstract class in Go? As Go doesn't allow us to have fields in interfaces, that would be a stateless object. So, in other words, is it possible to have some kind of default implementation for a method in Go?

Consider an example:

type Daemon interface {
    start(time.Duration)
    doWork()
}

func (daemon *Daemon) start(duration time.Duration) {
    ticker := time.NewTicker(duration)

    // this will call daemon.doWork() periodically  
    go func() {
        for {
            <- ticker.C
            daemon.doWork()
        }
    }()
}

type ConcreteDaemonA struct { foo int }
type ConcreteDaemonB struct { bar int }

func (daemon *ConcreteDaemonA) doWork() {
    daemon.foo++
    fmt.Println("A: ", daemon.foo)
}

func (daemon *ConcreteDaemonB) doWork() {
    daemon.bar--
    fmt.Println("B: ", daemon.bar)
}

func main() {
    dA := new(ConcreteDaemonA)
    dB := new(ConcreteDaemonB)

    start(dA, 1 * time.Second)
    start(dB, 5 * time.Second)

    time.Sleep(100 * time.Second)
}

This won't compile as it's not possible to use interface as a receiver.

In fact, I have already answered my question (see the answer below). However, is it an idiomatic way to implement such logic? Are there any reasons not to have a default implementation besides language's simplicity?

12

If you want to provide a "default" implementation (for Daemon.start()), that is not the characteristic of an interface (at least not in Go). That is a characteristic of a concrete (non-interface) type.

So Daemon in your case should be a concrete type, conveniently a struct since you want it to have fields. And the task to be done can be either a value of an interface type, or in a simple case just a function value (a simple case means it would only have one method).

With interface type

Try the complete app on the Go Playground.

type Task interface {
    doWork()
}

type Daemon struct {
    task Task
}

func (d *Daemon) start(t time.Duration) {
    ticker := time.NewTicker(t)
    // this will call task.doWork() periodically
    go func() {
        for {
            <-ticker.C
            d.task.doWork()
        }
    }()
}

type MyTask struct{}

func (m MyTask) doWork() {
    fmt.Println("Doing my work")
}

func main() {
    d := Daemon{task: MyTask{}}
    d.start(time.Millisecond*300)

    time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)
}

With a function value

In this simple case this one is shorter. Try it on the Go Playground.

type Daemon struct {
    task func()
}

func (d *Daemon) start(t time.Duration) {
    ticker := time.NewTicker(t)
    // this will call task() periodically
    go func() {
        for {
            <-ticker.C
            d.task()
        }
    }()
}

func main() {
    d := Daemon{task: func() {
        fmt.Println("Doing my work")
    }}
    d.start(time.Millisecond * 300)

    time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)
}
1
  • The function value solution is by far semantically closest to the Java or C# notion of an abstract class. This should be the accepted answer. – David Moles Nov 7 '20 at 5:48
10

The other answers provide an alternative to your problem, however they proposed solution without using abstract classes/struct, and I guess if you were interested in using abstract class like solution, here is very precise solution to your problem:

Go plaground

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

type Daemon interface {
    start(time.Duration)
    doWork()
}

type AbstractDaemon struct {
    Daemon
}

func (a *AbstractDaemon) start(duration time.Duration) {
    ticker := time.NewTicker(duration)

    // this will call daemon.doWork() periodically  
    go func() {
        for {
            <- ticker.C
            a.doWork()
        }
    }()
}



type ConcreteDaemonA struct { 
*AbstractDaemon
foo int
}

func newConcreteDaemonA() *ConcreteDaemonA {
  a:=&AbstractDaemon{}
  r:=&ConcreteDaemonA{a, 0}
  a.Daemon = r
  return r
}


type ConcreteDaemonB struct { 
*AbstractDaemon
bar int
}

func newConcreteDaemonB() *ConcreteDaemonB {
  a:=&AbstractDaemon{}
  r:=&ConcreteDaemonB{a, 0}
  a.Daemon = r
  return r
}



func (a *ConcreteDaemonA) doWork() {
    a.foo++
    fmt.Println("A: ", a.foo)
}

func (b *ConcreteDaemonB) doWork() {
    b.bar--
    fmt.Println("B: ", b.bar)
}


func main() {
    var dA  Daemon = newConcreteDaemonA()
    var dB  Daemon = newConcreteDaemonB()

    dA.start(1 * time.Second)
    dB.start(5 * time.Second)

    time.Sleep(100 * time.Second)
}

If this is still not obvious how to use abstract classes/multi-inheritance in go-lang here is the post with comprehensive details. Abstract Classes In Go

1
  • can you please fix the indentation in your code block? – Ghilteras Jun 16 at 21:07
6

An easy solution is to move daemon *Daemon to the argument list (thus removing start(...) from the interface):

type Daemon interface {
    // start(time.Duration)
    doWork()
}

func start(daemon Daemon, duration time.Duration) { ... }

func main() {
    ...
    start(dA, 1 * time.Second)
    start(dB, 5 * time.Second)
    ...
}
2
  • 3
    It's not just easy, it's the idea and purpose of interfaces. I'd suggest to make your answer even stronger. – Uvelichitel May 15 '15 at 16:36
  • 1
    This is not very much like other languages' notion of an abstract class, but it is probably the most idiomatic Go solution (it's the way a lot of the core IO APIs work, for example). – David Moles Nov 7 '20 at 5:50
1

The solution by Max Malysh would work in some cases if you don't need a factory. However the solution given by Adrian Witas could cause cyclic dependencies issues.

This is the way I achieved implementing an abstract class the easy way respecting cyclic dependencies and good factory patterns.

Let us assume we have the following package structure for our component

component
  base
    types.go
    abstract.go
  impl1
    impl.go
  impl2
    impl.go
  types.go
  factory.go

Define the definition of the component, in this example it will be defined here:

component/types.go

package component

type IComponent interface{
    B() int
    A() int
    Sum() int
    Average() int
}

Now let's assume we want to create an abstract class that implements Sum and Average only, but in this abstract implementation we would like to have access to use the values returned by the implemented A and B

To achieve this, we should define another interface for the abstract members of the abstract implementation

component/base/types.go

package base

type IAbstractComponentMembers {
    A() int
    B() int
}

And then we can proceed to implement the abstract "class"

component/base/abstract.go

package base

type AbstractComponent struct {
    IAbstractComponentsMember
}

func (a *AbstractComponent) Sum() int {
    return a.A() + a.B()
}

func (a *AbstractComponent) Average() int {
    return a.Sum() / 2
}

And now we proceed to the implementations

component/impl1/impl.go // Asume something similar for impl2

package impl1

type ComponentImpl1 struct {
    base.AbstractComponent
}

func (c *ComponentImpl1) A() int {
    return 2
}

func (c *ComponentImpl1) A() int {
    return 4
}

// Here is how we would build this component
func New() *ComponentImpl1 {
    impl1 := &ComponentImpl1{}
    abs:=&base.AbstractComponent{
        IAbstractComponentsMember: impl1,
    }
    impl1.AbstractComponent = abs
    return impl1
}

The reason we use a separate interface for this instead of using Adrian Witas example, is because if we use the same interface in this case, if we import the base package in impl* to use the abstract "class" and also we import the impl* packages in the components package, so the factory can register them, we'll find a circular reference.

So we could have a factory implementation like this

component/factory.go

package component

// Default component implementation to use
const defaultName = "impl1"
var instance *Factory

type Factory struct {
    // Map of constructors for the components
    ctors map[string]func() IComponent
}

func (f *factory) New() IComponent {
    ret, _ := f.Create(defaultName)
    return ret
}

func (f *factory) Create(name string) (IComponent, error) {
    ctor, ok := f.ctors[name]
    if !ok {
        return nil, errors.New("component not found")
    }
    return ctor(), nil
}

func (f *factory) Register(name string, constructor func() IComponent) {
    f.ctors[name] = constructor
}

func Factory() *Factory {
    if instance == nil {
        instance = &factory{ctors: map[string]func() IComponent{}}
    }
    return instance
}

// Here we register the implementations in the factory
func init() {
    Factory().Register("impl1", func() IComponent { return impl1.New() })
    Factory().Register("impl2", func() IComponent { return impl2.New() })
}
6
  • @"Juan Carlos Diaz" please elaborate on recursion, have you meant package cyclic references (they are different things), I have assumed that package organization was out of scope for this question, the presented abstract class with interface makes the trick, so I do not see your proposed solution much different from what I have proposed, besides you have broken it down per different packages, and added factory struct – Adrian May 31 '18 at 20:41
  • @AdrianWitas You're right, I meant cyclic references, edited. However with your solution you will in fact run into cyclic issues if you use a factory pattern, try it – jucardi Jun 1 '18 at 21:33
  • @"Juan Carlos Diaz", I do not see any package cyclic reference issue: see factory extension within one package play.golang.org/p/Tu0RNmRWHsa , so as stated the only difference between presented solutions is delegating into packages (it has its own value) and adding factory. Appreciate correction. – Adrian Jun 1 '18 at 22:31
  • @AdrianWitas of course you won't see any cyclic problems with that playground link, you are doing everything in a single file, single package, that is not a real factory scenario at all. – jucardi Jun 3 '18 at 1:53
  • @AdrianWitas. I wanted to reply explaining but the comments are limited with a max about of characters, so I added my comments here play.golang.org/p/Qi6sKbOF7Ob And please, if you have a suggestion, let me know. The way I did it was with your suggestions but with a minor change of wrapping the abstract members in its own interface – jucardi Jun 3 '18 at 2:31
1

The functionality of abstract class has below requirements 1. It should not be possible to create direct instance of abstract class 2. It should provide default fields and methods.

A combination of interface and struct can be used to fulfill above two requirements. For example we can see below

package main

import "fmt"

//Abstract Interface
type iAlpha interface {
    work()
    common(iAlpha)
}

//Abstract Concrete Type
type alpha struct {
    name string
}

func (a *alpha) common(i iAlpha) {
    fmt.Println("common called")
    i.work()
}

//Implementing Type
type beta struct {
    alpha
}

func (b *beta) work() {
    fmt.Println("work called")
    fmt.Printf("Name is %s\n", b.name)
}

func main() {
    a := alpha{name: "test"}
    b := &beta{alpha: a}
    b.common(b)
}


  Output:
    common called
    work called
    Name is test

One important point to mention here is that all default method should have iAlpha as first argument, and if default method needs to call any unimplemented method they they will call on this interface. This is same as we did in common method above - i.work().

Source: https://golangbyexample.com/go-abstract-class/

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