1

I have been trying to find information on the (non-standard, cf. 1.0, 1.1, 1.2, 2.0) support for variadic macros in OpenCL implementations.

I have access to the following platforms, all of which support variadic macros:

  • Mac OS X, Intel CPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 1.1
  • Mac OS X, Intel GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 1.2(Dec 23 2014 00:18:31)
  • Mac OS X, ATI GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 1.2 (Aug 17 2014 20:27:52)
  • Mac OS X, Nvidia GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 10.2.7 310.41.25f01

Could other please check their available implementations so that we can have a map of implementations that supported variadic macros?

Edit: Here is a self-contained test program that makes uses of a variadic macro.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#ifdef __APPLE__
#include <OpenCL/opencl.h>
#else
#include <CL/cl.h>
#endif

const char* SOURCE =
"#define KERNEL(name, ...) kernel void name(__VA_ARGS__) \n"
"                                                        \n"
"KERNEL(test, global float* input, global float* output) \n"
"{                                                       \n"
"    int i = get_global_id(0);                           \n"
"    output[i] = input[i];                               \n"
"}                                                       \n"
"                                                        \n"
;

static const int GPU = 1;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int err;

    cl_float input[16];
    cl_float output[16];

    size_t global = 16;
    size_t local = 16;

    cl_platform_id platform_id;
    cl_device_id device_id;
    cl_context context;
    cl_command_queue command_queue;
    cl_program program;
    cl_kernel kernel;
    cl_mem input_buf;
    cl_mem output_buf;

    err = clGetPlatformIDs(1, &platform_id, NULL);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clGetPlatformIDs\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    err = clGetDeviceIDs(platform_id, GPU ? CL_DEVICE_TYPE_GPU : CL_DEVICE_TYPE_CPU, 1, &device_id, NULL);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clGetDeviceIDs\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    context = clCreateContext(0, 1, &device_id, NULL, NULL, &err);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clCreateContext\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    command_queue = clCreateCommandQueue(context, device_id, 0, &err);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clCreateCommandQueue\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    program = clCreateProgramWithSource(context, 1, &SOURCE, NULL, &err);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clCreateProgramWithSource\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    err = clBuildProgram(program, 0, NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL);
    if (err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        size_t len;
        char buffer[2048];

        printf("error: clBuildProgram\n");
        clGetProgramBuildInfo(program, device_id, CL_PROGRAM_BUILD_LOG, sizeof(buffer), buffer, &len);
        printf("%s\n", buffer);

        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    kernel = clCreateKernel(program, "test", &err);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clCreateKernel\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    input_buf = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_ONLY, 16*sizeof(cl_float), NULL, NULL);
    output_buf = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_WRITE_ONLY, 16*sizeof(cl_float), NULL, NULL);
    if(!input_buf || !output_buf)
    {
        printf("error: clCreateBuffer\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    err = clEnqueueWriteBuffer(command_queue, input_buf, CL_TRUE, 0, 16*sizeof(cl_float), input, 0, NULL, NULL);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clEnqueueWriteBuffer\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    err = 0;
    err |= clSetKernelArg(kernel, 0, sizeof(cl_mem), &input_buf);
    err |= clSetKernelArg(kernel, 1, sizeof(cl_mem), &output_buf);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clSetKernelArg\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    err = clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(command_queue, kernel, 1, NULL, &global, &local, 0, NULL, NULL);
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clEnqueueNDRangeKernel\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    clFinish(command_queue);

    err = clEnqueueReadBuffer(command_queue, output_buf, CL_TRUE, 0, 16*sizeof(cl_float), output, 0, NULL, NULL );
    if(err != CL_SUCCESS)
    {
        printf("error: clEnqueueReadBuffer\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    clReleaseMemObject(input_buf);
    clReleaseMemObject(output_buf);
    clReleaseProgram(program);
    clReleaseKernel(kernel);
    clReleaseCommandQueue(command_queue);
    clReleaseContext(context);

    printf("success\n");

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}
  • I'm surprised myself. I suspect that it is just Apple's implementation allowing for this. – user2425792 May 15 '15 at 14:43
  • @Cicada I have added a self-contained test program that contains a variadic macro. It compiles and runs without problem on the platforms indicated above. – user2425792 May 15 '15 at 15:16
  • On Linux, this works with AMD, doesn't work with NVIDIA or Intel. Aside from the spec not allowing them, there's no fundamental reason why they shouldn't work - it's just a simple preprocessor substitution. – jprice May 15 '15 at 15:47
3

For posterity, I will answer this myself with a list of platforms that were tested for support of variadic macros. Future visitor, please feel free to add any platform you can test to this list.

Supported:

  • Mac OS X, Intel CPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 1.1
  • Mac OS X, Intel GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 1.2(Dec 23 2014 00:18:31)
  • Mac OS X, ATI GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 1.2 (Aug 17 2014 20:27:52)
  • Debian unstable, AMD GPU, OpenCL 2.0, driver: amdgpu-pro 16.15.2-277429
  • Mac OS X, Nvidia GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: 10.2.7 310.41.25f01
  • Redhat Enterprise Linux 5, Nvidia CUDA SDK 4.0, OpenCL 1.0 CUDA, driver: 260.19.26

Unsupported:

  • Debian unstable, Intel GPU, OpenCL 1.2, driver: Beignet 1.1.1
| improve this answer | |
0

Unsupported:

  • Win10 x64 2004, Intel CPU & GPU, OpenCL 2.1
  • Win10 x64 2004, NVIDIA GPU, OpenCL 1.2 CUDA 11.0.140
| improve this answer | |

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