44

I'm writing a basic app to learn ASP.NET 5. One area I find very confusing is configuration. Prior to ASP.NET 5, I could do the following:

var settingValue = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["SomeKey"];

I would have lines of code like that sprinkled throughout my code. Now, in the vNext world, I have a config.json file that looks like this:

config.json

{
  "AppSettings": {
    "SomeKey":"SomeValue"
  }
}

Then in Startup.cs, I have the following: Startup.cs

public IConfiguration Configuration { get; set; }
public Startup(IHostingEnvironment environment) 
{
  Configuration = new Configuration()
      .AddJsonFile("config.json");
}

From there, I'm totally stumped. I have MyClass.cs in /src/Website/Code/Models/MyClass.cs.

MyClass.cs

public class MyClass
{
  public string DoSomething() 
  {
    var result = string.Empty;
    var keyValue = string.Empty; // TODO: What do I do here? How do I get the value of "AppSettings:SomeKey"?
    return result;
  }
}

How do I get the value of "AppSettings:SomeKey"?

1
  • @MStodd - Yes. MVC6 (ASP.NET 5) May 15, 2015 at 18:53

4 Answers 4

17

ASP.NET 5 makes heavy use of Dependency Injection, so if you are also using Dependency Injection then this is very simple. If you examine the sample MVC6 project, you can see how this works:

First, there's a class AppSettings defined in Properties, which is a strongly-typed version of the options your class supports. In the sample project, this just contains SiteTitle.

public class AppSettings
{
    public string SiteTitle { get; set; }
}

Then, this class is initialised through dependency injection in ConfigureServices. Configuration here is the one you created in the constructor of the Startup class.

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.Configure<AppSettings>(Configuration.GetSubKey("AppSettings"));
    // ...
}

Then, assuming your class is instantiated by the dependency injection container, you can simply ask for an IOptions and you'll get one. For example, in a controller you could have the following:

public class HomeController
{
    private string _title;
    public HomeController(IOptions<AppSettings> settings) 
    {
        _title = settings.Options.SiteTitle;
    }
}
5
  • I'm curious, which sample MVC6 project are you referring to? Do you have a link?
    – Some User
    May 22, 2015 at 19:01
  • The one you get when you do new MVC project in Visual Studio
    – Richard
    May 22, 2015 at 19:08
  • 3
    @SerjSagan How did you get this to work. On my system Configuration does not have a GetSubKey method. Feb 2, 2016 at 22:22
  • 6
    There's a couple of ways. For root level stuff use Configuration.GetSection("AppSettings") For nested stuff use Configuration["Data:DefaultConnection:ConnectionString"]
    – Serj Sagan
    Feb 2, 2016 at 22:47
  • 3
    Just to note that, as of today with Asp.Net Core RC1 already out and RC2 coming, this Options Model is the suggested way to go. The interface changed a little: now it would be settings.Value.SiteTitle, plus in ConfigureServices one needs services.AddOptions(); to setup options with DI
    – superjos
    Apr 29, 2016 at 10:01
15

I use ASP.NET 5 dependency injection, like so.

config.json:

{
    "random":  "Hello World!"
}

startup.cs:

public class Startup
{
    public Startup(IHostingEnvironment env, IApplicationEnvironment appEnv)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder(appEnv.ApplicationBasePath)
            .AddJsonFile("config.json");

        Configuration = builder.Build();
    }

    public IConfiguration Configuration { get; set; }

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddMvc();
        services.AddSingleton<IConfiguration>(sp => { return Configuration; });
    }

    public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
    {
        app.UseMvc(routes =>
        {
            routes.MapRoute(name: "default", template: "{controller=Home}/{action=Index}/{id?}");
        });

    }

}

Controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{

    IConfiguration config;

    public HomeController(IConfiguration config)
    {
        this.config = config;
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        var template = "<marquee>{0}</marquee>";
        var content = string.Format(template, config.Get("random"));
        return Content(content, "text/html");
    }
}
2
  • 1
    In the latest version of ASP.NET Core, var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder().AddJsonFile("appsettings.json") Apr 2, 2016 at 20:46
  • ... and changed yet again in Core 2.0.
    – Marc L.
    Jan 11, 2018 at 22:48
14

I highly recommend using the OptionsModel instead of reading the configuration directly. It allows strong typed model binding to configuration.

Here is an example: GitHub.com/aspnet/Options/test/Microsoft.Extensions.Options.Test/OptionsTest.cs

For your particular case create a model:

class AppSettings {
    public string SomeSetting {get;set;}
}

and then bind it to your configuration:

var config = // The configuration object
var options = ConfigurationBinder.Bind<AppSettings>(config); 
Console.WriteLine(options.SomeSetting);

That way you don't have to worry from where the setting comes from, how it is stored or what is the structure. You simply predefine your options model and magic happens.

9
  • With the OptionsModel approach, how should one define AppSettings for more complex config.json scenarios? For example, what if config.json looked like { "AppSettings": { "SiteTitle":"My Site"}, "SearchSettings":{"Service.Key":"12345"}}
    – Some User
    May 22, 2015 at 20:12
  • 1
    Create a few classes with properties. Similar to the code here that has NestedOptions May 22, 2015 at 21:36
  • I reveiwed the OptionsModel approach. Yet, its not clear to me the value other than strongly typed values. The larger problem that I think exists with the OptionsModel approach is getting values into a reusable library. For example, what if I wanted to create a re-usable logging library? How would the options get to that library?
    – Some User
    May 24, 2015 at 15:42
  • It appears to me that this functionality isn't so much the OptionsModel as it is the ConfigurationBinder at work. I've been trying to figure out the point of Options (IOption, OptionManager, etc) and haven't really arrived yet. Jun 20, 2015 at 14:44
  • 2
    @VictorHurdugaci Thanks for fixing the link, unfortunately for me I still have no idea how to actually get the data from either the project.json or config.json. Feb 2, 2016 at 22:21
12

Use this:

var value = Configuration.Get("AppSettings:SomeKey");

Based on this blog post. The colon is similar to dot notation and is used for navigation down the hierarchy.

If you need the value in other classes, you should inject it in. ASP.NET has built in dependency injection, but if you just need one instance of MyClass you can new it up instead of setting up a DI container.

public IConfiguration Configuration { get; set; }

public Startup(IHostingEnvironment environment) 
{
    Configuration = new Configuration()
      .AddJsonFile("config.json");
    //generally here you'd set up your DI container. But for now we'll just new it up
    MyClass c = new MyClass(Configuration.Get("AppSettings:SomeKey"));
}

public class MyClass
{
    private readonly string Setting; //if you need to pass multiple objects, use a custom POCO (and interface) instead of a string.

    public MyClass(string setting) //This is called constructor injection
    {
        Setting = setting;
    }

    public string DoSomething() 
    {
        var result = string.Empty;
        //Use setting here
        return result;
    }
}
7
  • Where does the Configuration property/class come from? I added using Microsoft.Framework.ConfigurationModel to top of MyClass.cs. However, I cannot use Configuration.Get May 15, 2015 at 19:07
  • It's in Microsoft.Framework.ConfigurationModel. And you can store your configuration wherever you like in memory instead of reading from the file each time. But I suggest you centralize it so you don't strew it all throughout your code.
    – mason
    May 15, 2015 at 19:52
  • Sorry but I downvoted your answer because you can use the OptionsModel to the model binding. There is no need to read the configuration yourself. (see my answer) May 16, 2015 at 2:39
  • 21
    @VictorHurdugaci You are certainly welcome to use downvotes as you see fit. But I think that's an incredibly poor reason to downvote someone's answer. It's a new architecture, I wasn't aware of the option for that. I have watched plenty of demos from your company and none of them have shown a strongly typed model binding option. My answer would work just fine and cleanly shows how to solve the problem. Sure strongly typed model binding is nice, but I would think it rude to go around downvoting people that have alternative working answers, especially if my company were the one suggesting them.
    – mason
    May 16, 2015 at 12:26
  • 10
    @Victor Seriously bad form to downvote someone else's answer just because you like yours better. Downvotes are for wrong answers or inappropriate ones. If the answer answers the question in a way that works then show it some respect.
    – drobertson
    Mar 24, 2016 at 0:11

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