I have this image : https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Mihara/RasterPropMonitor/master/GameData/JSI/RasterPropMonitor/Library/Components/NavBall/NavBall000.png

I don’t know exactly what kind on projection it is, I guess equirectangular or mercator by the shape. It's the texture for an attitude indicator, b.

I want to draw a orthographic projection, b or maybe a General Perspective projection (which one looks better) of it according to a direction vector defined by two angles (heading and pitch). This direction define a point on the sphere, this point should be the center of the projection.

I want it to look from the pilot point of view, so only half of the sphere should be drawn.

I use python, and I have not yet chosen a graphic library, I will probably be using pygame though.

I’ve found something related : http://www.pygame.org/project-Off-Center+Map+Projections-2881-.html but it uses OpenGL and I have no experience with it, but I can try if needed.

How should I do that ? I probably can draw it manually by calculating every pixel from the calculation formulas but I think there are some kind of library tools to do that efficiently (hardware accelerated probably ?).

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For an all-Python solution (using numpy/scipy array ops, which will be faster than any explicit per-pixel looping), this:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import math
import numpy as np
import scipy
import scipy.misc
import scipy.ndimage.interpolation
import subprocess

src=scipy.misc.imread("ji80w.png")

size=256
frames=50

for frame in xrange(0,frames):

    # Image pixel co-ordinates
    px=np.arange(-1.0,1.0,2.0/size)+1.0/size
    py=np.arange(-1.0,1.0,2.0/size)+1.0/size
    hx,hy=scipy.meshgrid(px,py)

    # Compute z of sphere hit position, if pixel's ray hits
    r2=hx*hx+hy*hy
    hit=(r2<=1.0)
    hz=np.where(
        hit,
        -np.sqrt(1.0-np.where(hit,r2,0.0)),
        np.NaN
        )

    # Some spin and tilt to make things interesting
    spin=2.0*np.pi*(frame+0.5)/frames
    cs=math.cos(spin)
    ss=math.sin(spin)
    ms=np.array([[cs,0.0,ss],[0.0,1.0,0.0],[-ss,0.0,cs]])

    tilt=0.125*np.pi*math.sin(2.0*spin)
    ct=math.cos(tilt)
    st=math.sin(tilt)
    mt=np.array([[1.0,0.0,0.0],[0.0,ct,st],[0.0,-st,ct]])

    # Rotate the hit points
    xyz=np.dstack([hx,hy,hz])
    xyz=np.tensordot(xyz,mt,axes=([2],[1]))
    xyz=np.tensordot(xyz,ms,axes=([2],[1]))
    x=xyz[:,:,0]
    y=xyz[:,:,1]
    z=xyz[:,:,2]

    # Compute map position of hit
    latitude =np.where(hit,(0.5+np.arcsin(y)/np.pi)*src.shape[0],0.0)
    longitude=np.where(hit,(1.0+np.arctan2(z,x)/np.pi)*0.5*src.shape[1],0.0)
    latlong=np.array([latitude,longitude])

    # Resample, and zap non-hit pixels
    dst=np.zeros((size,size,3))
    for channel in [0,1,2]:
        dst[:,:,channel]=np.where(
            hit,
            scipy.ndimage.interpolation.map_coordinates(
                src[:,:,channel],
                latlong,
                order=1
                ),
            0.0
            )

    # Save to f0000.png, f0001.png, ... 
    scipy.misc.imsave('f{:04}.png'.format(frame),dst)

# Use imagemagick to make an animated gif
subprocess.call('convert -delay 10 f????.png anim.gif',shell=True)

will get you

animated thing.

OpenGL is really the place to be doing this sort of pixel wrangling though, especially if it's for anything interactive.

  • Amazing really nice work ! – luxcem May 16 '15 at 13:56

I glanced at the code in the "Off-Center Map Projections" stuff you linked...

As a starting point for you, I'd say it was pretty good, especially if you want to achieve this with any sort of efficiency in PyGame as offloading any sort of per-pixel operations to OpenGL will be much faster than they'll ever be in Python.

Obviously to get any further you'll need to understand the OpenGL; the projection is implemented in main.py's GLSL code (the stuff in the string passed to mod_program.ShaderFragment) - the atan and asin there shouldn't be a surprise if you've read up on equirectangular projections.

However, to get to what you want, you'll have to figure out how to render a sphere instead of the viewport-filling quad (rendered in main.py at glBegin(GL_QUADS);). Or alternatively, stick with the screen-filling quad and do a ray-sphere intersection in the shader code too (which is effectively what the python code in my other answer does).

  • Thank you for help, I’ll definitively look at OpenGL. – luxcem May 15 '15 at 23:04

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.