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I'd like to make my non-breaking spaces narrower for use with French punctuation, preferably without resorting to lowering font-size.

Here's what I tried:

Text<span class"sp-thin-fr">&nbsp;</span>?
span.sp-thin-fr {
    display: inline-block;
    width:   0.125em;  /* 1/8 em */
    }

The problem is that display: inline-block for some reason overrides the non-breaking property of nbsp (tested in Firefox, Chrome and IE 11).

Can anyone think of another way of doing this, without putting the characters around the space in spans with white-space: nowrap applied? (Note that I'd like to be able to set the exact width for the space.)

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  • 1
    letter-spacing?? like maybe, letter-spacing: 0px; jsfiddle.net/rkbkbq8q You can even set a negative value. Commented May 15, 2015 at 23:24
  • @jonny.milano - Add some code and submit it as an answer.
    – BSMP
    Commented May 15, 2015 at 23:31
  • I thought about it, but then there wouldn't be any spaces when copying the text from the web, and the expected thing for French documents is to have normal non-breaking spaces before punctuation (<hush>they're very touchy about that</hush>)
    – typo
    Commented May 15, 2015 at 23:39
  • Disregard the above comment; I missed that nbsp and thought you put span around last letter and question mark.
    – typo
    Commented May 15, 2015 at 23:53

1 Answer 1

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No need to use display:inline-block.

letter-spacing would probably work here. So:

span.sp-thin-fr { letter-spacing: 0px; }

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/rkbkbq8q/

4
  • Actually, I think margin-right would probably be a better idea in this case, because the CSS3 draft that applying letter-spacing to an element containing only a single character has no effect on the rendered result. But that still leaves me with the problem of exact sizing.
    – typo
    Commented May 16, 2015 at 0:06
  • Well I'll be.. Hey! You answered your own question! :) Commented May 16, 2015 at 0:09
  • yeah, well, not really. I considered it before, but I cant set the exact desired width that way cause every font has a space of slightly different size and I'd need to calculate the offset based on it. The Unicode guys really screwed things up for typographers when they didn't include non-breaking variant for each of the spaces.
    – typo
    Commented May 16, 2015 at 0:40
  • Hmm... Didn't think about the fonts having different space widths. Maybe use 'rem' units instead of pixels, then the measurement would be more relative to the actual individual font, like: letter-spacing: -0.1rem; /* or zero */ It's a tough question. Kinda why I commented originally and didn't post an answer directly ;) Commented May 16, 2015 at 0:44

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