4

PowerShell uses copy-on-write semantic for inner scopes.

This means that if you'll change outer variable in the inner scope then inner scope would deal with it's own copy. Here is an example:

$list = @(1, 2)

Function Foo
{
  "Foo: initial value - $list"
  $list = $list + 3
  "Foo: `$list: $list, `$global:list: $global:list"  
}

The output would be:

Foo: initial value - 1 2
Foo: $list: 1 2 3, $global:list: 1 2

Ok, this behavior is by design. But lets change Foo function a bit:

Function Foo
{
  "Foo: initial value - $list"
  $list += 3
  "Foo: `$list: $list, `$global:list: $global:list"  
}

The output would be:

Foo: initial value - 1 2
Foo: $list: 3, $global:list: 1 2

Hm... I can assume that x += y operator is not exactly the same that x = x + y. But that is not exacted. Let's change the code once more:

Function Foo
{
  New-Variable -Name z -Value 42
  "Foo: initial value - $list"
  $list += 3
  "Foo: `$list: $list, `$global:list: $global:list"  
}

And now the output would be:

Foo: initial value - 1 2
Foo: $list: 1 2 3, $global:list: 1 2

It seems like a bug. The only question is where exactly? I assume behavior of += in second case is incorrect. But maybe I missing something...

  • I have no evidence for this at all but I assume the issue here is what += desugars into and when a local variable is created anew versus when it gets copied. The use of $list in the inner scope triggers the copy where += itself does not. This is similar to the python behavior of variables in scopes and how later assignments in a scope can implicitly shadow a global used earlier in that scope (because of hoisting). – Etan Reisner May 17 '15 at 18:32
  • But why += is working with New-Variable cmdlet was used in the beginning of the method? This difference in behavior is definetely a bug. The question is: what is "correct" behavior? – Sergey Teplyakov May 17 '15 at 18:34
  • It probably forces initialization of the inner scope in a way that the += assignment doesn't but yes, that certainly is odd and confusing. I'd missed that distinction in my original reading. – Etan Reisner May 17 '15 at 18:46
  • It looks like a bug. You may submit it here. As far as a bug is involved, it's difficult to say which one is correct. – Roman Kuzmin May 17 '15 at 18:46
  • 1
1

I tried these 3 test in PowerShell 2.0. All results are the same as in the first test. I also tried a scalar value $list = 42 in order to see if the issue is specific for arrays. In v2 all tests are the same (45, 45, 45), in v3 they get 45, 3, 45. So the issue is not just about arrays.

Then I took at look at breaking changes in v3.0, see WMF 3 Release Notes.docx at WMF 3.0.

The document says:

Change

Read/Modify/Write operators no longer use dynamic scoping for the Read
operation. Also, compound equality operators (including +=, -=, *=, %=, ++,
--) do not use dynamic scoping.  The variable is always in the current scope.

Sample

$x = 1
& { $x += 1; $x }
# Returns 2 in Windows PowerShell 2.0
# Returns 1 in Windows PowerShell 3.0

Error Message

No error. Results differ.

Workaround

Rewrite to use only the simple assignment operator:
$x = 1
& { $x = $x + 1; $x}

According to the document, in v3 the test 2 is correct and the test 3 shows a bug.

UPDATE: PowerShell 4.0 is the same as 3.0. I do not have v5 in order to test this.

  • I added this issue to PowerShellTraps as Compound-equality-operators. It uses two very simple tests. – Roman Kuzmin May 18 '15 at 6:10
  • Also, it looks like ++ still uses the dynamic scope, in contrast to the release notes. Added a test to the above PowerShellTraps. – Roman Kuzmin May 18 '15 at 8:46

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