43

If I define a struct template Bar which accepts a template argument:

template <template <int,bool,char> class>
struct Bar {};

I can instantiate it using a struct template such as Zod:

template <int,bool,char> struct Zod {};
Bar<Zod> a;

I can also instantiate it using a nested struct template such as JKL:

struct GHI {
  template <int,bool,char>
  struct JKL {};
};
Bar <GHI::JKL> b;

Why can't I instantiate Bar using a nested variadic struct template such as DEF?:

template <typename ...Ts>
struct ABC {
  template <Ts ...>
  struct DEF {};
};

Bar<ABC<int,bool,char>::DEF> c;

G++ 4.9.2 complains of a type/value mismatch; while Clang 3.4.2's error reports that the template template argument has different template parameters than its corresponding template template parameter.

  • 1
    Doesn't compile on gcc 5.1.0 or clang 3.6.0 either, for what it's worth. – Barry May 17 '15 at 23:17
  • 2
    @vsoftco ABC<int,bool,char>::DEF<4,true,'c'> foo; works. – Barry May 17 '15 at 23:30
  • 1
    The tricky part is that DEF actually takes a non-type template parameter pack. See the example in [temp.param]/p15. – T.C. May 18 '15 at 0:09
  • 1
    @Barry My point is that DEF's technically parameterized over a non-type parameter pack. And a template template argument taking a pack doesn't match a template template parameter not taking packs. – T.C. May 20 '15 at 15:27
  • 2
    @AndyProwl That's irrelevant. It is still a parameter pack, which is why §14.3.3/3 does not allow for a match. – Columbo May 26 '15 at 0:31
5
+25

Let's give DEF's parameter pack a name for ease of reference:

template <typename ...Ts>
struct ABC {
  template <Ts ... Values>
  struct DEF {};
};

The key point here is that by [temp.param]/p15, Ts... Values is both a pack expansion of Ts and a declaration of a parameter pack Values.

If a template-parameter is [...] a parameter-declaration that declares a parameter pack (8.3.5), then the template-parameter is a template parameter pack (14.5.3). A template parameter pack that is a parameter-declaration whose type contains one or more unexpanded parameter packs is a pack expansion.

Since DEF takes a non-type parameter pack, it doesn't match a template template parameter that doesn't take packs ([temp.arg.template]/p3):

A template-argument matches a template template-parameter P when each of the template parameters in the template-parameter-list of the template-argument’s corresponding class template or alias template A matches the corresponding template parameter in the template-parameter-list of P. Two template parameters match if they are of the same kind (type, non-type, template), for non-type template-parameters, their types are equivalent (14.5.6.1), and for template template-parameters, each of their corresponding template-parameters matches, recursively. When P’s template-parameter-list contains a template parameter pack (14.5.3), the template parameter pack will match zero or more template parameters or template parameter packs in the template-parameter-list of A with the same type and form as the template parameter pack in P (ignoring whether those template parameters are template parameter packs).

To be sure, Values is rather weird for packs - for every specialization of ABC, Values must contain a fixed number of arguments - but under the current rules it's still a pack, so the rules for packs apply.

  • 1
    I think I understand your interpretation, but there are still unclear points to me. In particular, which "rules for packs" are you referring to? Notice, that the last part of the paragraph you quote refers to the inverse situation (i.e. when the parameter, rather than the argument, is a pack). The first part of the quote mentions that a template template-argument matches a template template-parameter if the corresponding template parameters match, and that these can be of three kinds: "type", "non-type", and "template". I don't see special rules for "packs", nor is "pack" a kind of parameter – Andy Prowl May 26 '15 at 21:58
  • @AndyProwl Right. The second half says that if there's a pack in the parameter, it can match packs and non-packs in the argument. By default, if the parameter is not a pack, then it cannot match a pack in the argument, because nothing says a (non-pack) template parameter in the parameter can match a parameter pack in the argument. – T.C. May 26 '15 at 23:35
  • 1
    With template<template<int...> class> struct {};, and Bar<ABC<int,int,int>::DEF> c;, it compiles. But then they all have to be ints. So the compiler seems to make a distinction between a template argument pack, and 3 template arguments, when matching a template template argument... – tmlen May 27 '15 at 14:52
3

Like Barry said before about:

ABC<int,bool,char>::DEF<4,true,'c'> foo

And make a try and worked on Coliru online compiler gcc 5.1 c++14 in this site Compiler:

#include <iostream>
 template <template <int,bool,char> class>
struct Bar {};
template <int,bool,char> struct Zod {};

Bar<Zod> a;

struct GHI {
  template <int,bool,char>
  struct JKL {};
};

Bar <GHI::JKL> b;

template <template <typename... Ts> class>
struct Base {};
template<typename... Ts>
struct Floor {};
Base<Floor> c;

template <typename... Ts>
struct ABC {
  template <Ts... val>
  struct DEF {};
};
ABC<int,bool,char>::DEF<4,true,'c'> foo;

I made a search and found this Template parameter list.

Pack expansion may appear in a template parameter list:

 template<typename... T> struct value_holder
{
    template<T... Values> // expands to a non-type template parameter 
    struct apply { };     // list, such as <int, char, int(&)[5]>
};

where i tested some stuff in the run code compiler at: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/parameter_pack but also i found this Ellipses and Variadic Templates in visual studio 2013: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn439779.aspx

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