59

I have a function that needs to return a pointer to an object of class myClass. For this purpose I´m using std::unique_ptr.

If the function succeeds, it shall return a pointer to a object with data. If it fails, it should return null.

This is my code skeleton:

std::unique_ptr<myClass> getData()
{
   if (dataExists)
      ... create a new myClass object, populate and return it ...

   // No data found
   return std::unique_ptr<myClass> (null); // <--- Possible?
}

on main:

main()
{
   std::unique_ptr<myClass> returnedData;

   returnedData = getData();

   if (returnedData != null)  // <-- How to test for null?
   {
      cout << "No data returned." << endl;
      return 0;
   }

   // Process data
}

So here goes my questions:

a) Is that (returning an object or null) possible to be done using std::unique_ptr?

b) If possible, how to implement is?

c) If not possible, what are there alternatives?

Thanks for helping.

4
  • 1
    Creating a unique pointer as std::unique_ptr<T> myptr; doesn't allocate any memory, so you don't need to construct it and pass nullptr at all. So you can just create one and return it.
    – AndyG
    Commented May 17, 2015 at 23:55
  • 2
    nullptr is a keyword new in C++11 for better support of null pointers. unique_ptr can be constructed from nullptr, even implicitly.
    – dyp
    Commented May 17, 2015 at 23:57
  • I see the != operator is being deprecated in C++20 for unique_ptr? en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/unique_ptr
    – wcochran
    Commented Mar 24, 2022 at 16:05
  • 1
    @wcochran the definition of the operator != has been removed in C++20, but thanks to the spaceship operator <=> you can still use the != on the type (and all other comparisons). Commented Jan 5 at 14:02

4 Answers 4

78

Either of the following should work:

return std::unique_ptr<myClass>{};
return std::unique_ptr<myClass>(nullptr);

To test whether the returned object points to a valid object or not, simply use:

if ( returnedData )
{
   // ...
}

See http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/unique_ptr/operator_bool.

2
  • 5
    Testing the result will be like if (returnedData != std::nullptr) ?
    – Mendes
    Commented May 18, 2015 at 0:01
  • 1
    @Mendes: yes. unique_ptr has a conversion to bool operator that indicates whether the unique pointer is empty or not.
    – user118967
    Commented Sep 27, 2022 at 14:42
12

Yes it's possible. A default constructed unique_ptr is what you want:

Constructs a std::unique_ptr that owns nothing.

// No data found
return std::unique_ptr<myClass>{};

That is equivalent to the nullptr_t constructor, so perhaps this is more clear:

// No data found
return nullptr;
12

Yes, it is possible. A default constructed unique_ptr or one constructed from nullptr can be considered null:

std::unique_ptr<MyClass> getData()
{
    if (dataExists)
        return std::make_unique<MyClass>();
    return nullptr;
}

To test for null either compare against nullptr or take advantage of conversion to bool:

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<MyClass> returnedData = getData();

    if (returnedData)
    {
        ... 
    }
}
-1

In the latest C++ library there should be a make_unique function in <memory> allowing us to make unique_ptr's as easily as in the C++11 library allows with make_shared and shared pointers.

So you could elucidate the code a little by returning std::make_unique(nullptr)

Plus in the next version of C++ there will be an "option" type which will evaluate as either a some value or a none value. The none value won't be allowed to be treated as if it was a valid value, unlike the empty unique_ptr could be treated like a nullptr. The option type will represent yet another piece of Boost entering the standard library.

4
  • 1
    Yup, boost::optional. Is there a document showing its acceptance into C++17? Edit: I guess this'll do: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/optional Commented Apr 15, 2016 at 10:26
  • 1
    @underscore_d At this the N paper appears to be N4270, although the actual linked version of the paper seems rough (or "drafty" shall we say?) Commented Apr 15, 2016 at 10:36
  • Cool, thanks for the info! I hadn't heard about this being incorporated until now... or if I did hear, then I immediately forgot. Commented Apr 15, 2016 at 10:46
  • 3
    Your suggested code is wrong; std::make_unique requires a template argument specifying the object type to create, it forwards the function arguments to that object's constructor, and it never returns an empty pointer. Creating an empty pointer is just std::unique_ptr<myClass>{}; creating non-empty is std::make_unique<myClass>(myClassCtorArgs...)
    – boycy
    Commented Nov 15, 2017 at 16:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.