9
class Main
    def say_hello
        puts "Hello"
    end

    private
        def say_hi
            puts "hi"
        end
end

class SubMain < Main
    def say_hello
        puts "Testing #{say_hi}"
    end

end

test = SubMain.new
test.say_hello()    

OUTPUT:

hi

Testing

  • It inherits that method. Why do you think it should not be allowed to call it? – spickermann May 18 '15 at 1:16
  • 5
    @spickermann because that's how OOP behavior usually works. Private methods are private for a reason. Then there is no difference between protected and private methods if we allow child class to access them. – CodeCrack May 18 '15 at 1:45
  • 1
    @CodeCrack: There is a very important difference. Private methods can't be called on a receiver, even if the receiver is self. Protected methods can be called on receivers if the receiver is of the same class or an ancestor class. An often quoted example is the comparison: def <=>(other); self.value <=> other.value; end must have value as either public or protected, since a private value cannot be accessed on another object. Ruby "private" is pretty much what "protected" is in Java; it is a terminology shift. – Amadan May 18 '15 at 1:57
  • 1
    I agree that the visibility in Ruby differs from other programming languages like Java for example. But I would not call it wrong therefore. It is just different and you have to learn this differences between languages if you want to master multiple languages. – spickermann May 18 '15 at 2:00
  • 2
    And going by what other languages do is not very reliable. PHP silently ignores the 98 in 01398, producing 11; there is no reason other languages' parsing of integers should be expected to be similarly bad. Ruby has its own object model, not copied from Java or PHP; it satisfies all the requirements of OO paradigm; and should be learned on its own terms. – Amadan May 18 '15 at 2:02
11

The difference is that in ruby you can call private methods in subclasses implicitly but not explicitly. Protected can be called both ways. As for why? I guess you would have to ask Matz.

Example:

class TestMain

  protected
  def say_bueno
    puts "bueno"
  end

  def say_ni_hao
    puts "ni hao"
  end

  private
  def say_hi
    puts "hi"
  end

  def say_bonjour
    puts "bonjour"
  end
end

class SubMain < TestMain
  def say_hellos
    # works - protected/implicit
    say_bonjour
    # works - protected/explicit
    self.say_ni_hao

    # works - private/implicit
    say_hi
    # fails - private/explicit
    self.say_bonjour
  end
end

test = SubMain.new
test.say_hellos()

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