3

I need to turn foo,bar into

BAZ(foo) \
BAZ(bar)

The \ is there as-is.

I tried with echo 'foo,bar' | tr , '\n' | perl -pe 's/(.*)\n/BAZ($1) \\\n/g' but that produces

BAZ(foo) \
BAZ(bar) \

So, this is either a totally wrong approach or I'd need a way to ignore the last newline in a multiline string with Perl.

0

Using eof to detect if you're on the last line:

echo 'foo,bar' | tr , '\n' | perl -pe 'my $break = (eof) ? "" : "\\"; s/(.*)\n/BAZ($1) $break\n/g'
  • Thanks for producing something that's so close to my original statement. It doesn't even need an explanation because it's easy to comprehend. – Marcel Stör May 18 '15 at 14:28
3
echo 'foo,bar' | perl -ne'print join " \\\n", map "BAZ($_)", /\w+/g'

output

BAZ(foo) \
BAZ(bar)
3

You could use join with map, like this:

$ echo 'foo,bar' | perl -F, -lape '$_ = join(" \\\n", map { "BAZ(" . $_ . ")" } @F)'
BAZ(foo) \
BAZ(bar)
  • -a enables auto-split mode, splitting the input using the , delimiter and assigning it to @F
  • map takes every element of the array and wraps it
  • join adds the backslash and newline between each element
  • Works well, nice explanations, thanks. I'm not versed enough in Perl to decide if this or @robearl's answer are "better". His answer is easier to grasp for Perl rookies like me. – Marcel Stör May 18 '15 at 14:17
  • No problem. I guess that one advantage to this approach is that tr isn't needed. Personally, I find the logic simpler too - less conditional behaviour is a good thing. It's up to you though! I guess that once you become more familiar with using map (recommended), it makes a lot more sense. The use of -p and assigning to $_ saves a couple of characters but it's probably clearer to use -n and print instead. – Tom Fenech May 18 '15 at 14:30
1

Using awk you can do:

s='foo,bar'
awk -F, '{for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) printf "BAZ(%s) %s\n", $i, (i<NF)? "\\" : ""}' <<< "$s"
BAZ(foo) \
BAZ(bar)

Or using sed:

sed -r 's/([^,]+)$/BAZ(\1)/; s/([^,]+),/BAZ(\1) \\\n/g' <<< "$s"
BAZ(foo) \
BAZ(bar)
  • Thanks for the sed alternative. The -r flag doesn't work on OS X, the regexp would have to be re-phrased. – Marcel Stör May 18 '15 at 14:19
  • 1
    On OSX it will be: sed -E $'s/([^,]+)$/BAZ(\\1)/; s/([^,]+),/BAZ(\\1) \\\\\\\n/g <<< "$s" – anubhava May 18 '15 at 14:21

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