In this page, Albert Armea share a code to split videos by chapter using ffmpeg. The code is straight forward, but not quite good-looking.

ffmpeg -i "$SOURCE.$EXT" 2>&1 | grep Chapter | sed -E "s/ *Chapter #([0-9]+.[0-9]+): start ([0-9]+.[0-9]+), end ([0-9]+.[0-9]+)/-i \"$SOURCE.$EXT\" -vcodec copy -acodec copy -ss \2 -to \3 \"$SOURCE-\1.$EXT\"/" | xargs -n 11 ffmpeg

Is there an elegant way to do this job?

  • I had to make a slight modification to get that working because my chapters had the word "Chapter" in the title: | grep '^\s*Chapter' | – bmaupin Nov 18 '17 at 18:10
up vote 14 down vote accepted
+500

(Edit: This tip came from https://github.com/phiresky via this issue: https://github.com/harryjackson/ffmpeg_split/issues/2)

You can get chapters using:

ffprobe -i fname -print_format json -show_chapters -loglevel error

If I was writing this again I'd use ffprobe's json options

(Original answer follows)

This is a working python script. I tested it on several videos and it worked well. Python isn't my first language but I noticed you use it so I figure writing it in Python might make more sense. I've added it to Github. If you want to improve please submit pull requests.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import os
import re
import subprocess as sp
from subprocess import *
from optparse import OptionParser

def parseChapters(filename):
  chapters = []
  command = [ "ffmpeg", '-i', filename]
  output = ""
  try:
    # ffmpeg requires an output file and so it errors 
    # when it does not get one so we need to capture stderr, 
    # not stdout.
    output = sp.check_output(command, stderr=sp.STDOUT, universal_newlines=True)
  except CalledProcessError, e:
    output = e.output 

  for line in iter(output.splitlines()):
    m = re.match(r".*Chapter #(\d+:\d+): start (\d+\.\d+), end (\d+\.\d+).*", line)
    num = 0 
    if m != None:
      chapters.append({ "name": m.group(1), "start": m.group(2), "end": m.group(3)})
      num += 1
  return chapters

def getChapters():
  parser = OptionParser(usage="usage: %prog [options] filename", version="%prog 1.0")
  parser.add_option("-f", "--file",dest="infile", help="Input File", metavar="FILE")
  (options, args) = parser.parse_args()
  if not options.infile:
    parser.error('Filename required')
  chapters = parseChapters(options.infile)
  fbase, fext = os.path.splitext(options.infile)
  for chap in chapters:
    print "start:" +  chap['start']
    chap['outfile'] = fbase + "-ch-"+ chap['name'] + fext
    chap['origfile'] = options.infile
    print chap['outfile']
  return chapters

def convertChapters(chapters):
  for chap in chapters:
    print "start:" +  chap['start']
    print chap
    command = [
        "ffmpeg", '-i', chap['origfile'],
        '-vcodec', 'copy',
        '-acodec', 'copy',
        '-ss', chap['start'],
        '-to', chap['end'],
        chap['outfile']]
    output = ""
    try:
      # ffmpeg requires an output file and so it errors 
      # when it does not get one
      output = sp.check_output(command, stderr=sp.STDOUT, universal_newlines=True)
    except CalledProcessError, e:
      output = e.output
      raise RuntimeError("command '{}' return with error (code {}): {}".format(e.cmd, e.returncode, e.output))

if __name__ == '__main__':
  chapters = getChapters()
  convertChapters(chapters)
ffmpeg -i "$SOURCE.$EXT" 2>&1 \ # get metadata about file
| grep Chapter \ # search for Chapter in metadata and pass the results
| sed -E "s/ *Chapter #([0-9]+.[0-9]+): start ([0-9]+.[0-9]+), end ([0-9]+.[0-9]+)/-i \"$SOURCE.$EXT\" -vcodec copy -acodec copy -ss \2 -to \3 \"$SOURCE-\1.$EXT\"/" \ # filter the results, explicitly defining the timecode markers for each chapter
| xargs -n 11 ffmpeg # construct argument list with maximum of 11 arguments and execute ffmpeg

Your command parses through the files metadata and reads out the timecode markers for each chapter. You could do this manually for each chapter..

ffmpeg -i ORIGINALFILE.mp4 -acodec copy -vcodec copy -ss 0 -t 00:15:00 OUTFILE-1.mp4

or you can write out the chapter markers and run through them with this bash script which is just a little easier to read..

#!/bin/bash
# Author: http://crunchbang.org/forums/viewtopic.php?id=38748#p414992
# m4bronto

#     Chapter #0:0: start 0.000000, end 1290.013333
#       first   _     _     start    _     end

while [ $# -gt 0 ]; do

ffmpeg -i "$1" 2> tmp.txt

while read -r first _ _ start _ end; do
  if [[ $first = Chapter ]]; then
    read  # discard line with Metadata:
    read _ _ chapter

    ffmpeg -vsync 2 -i "$1" -ss "${start%?}" -to "$end" -vn -ar 44100 -ac 2 -ab 128  -f mp3 "$chapter.mp3" </dev/null

  fi
done <tmp.txt

rm tmp.txt

shift
done

or you can use HandbrakeCLI, as originally mentioned in this post, this example extracts chapter 3 to 3.mkv

HandBrakeCLI -c 3 -i originalfile.mkv -o 3.mkv

or another tool is mentioned in this post

mkvmerge -o output.mkv --split chapters:all input.mkv

I modified Harry's script to use the chapter name for the filename. It outputs into a new directory with the name of the input file (minus extension). It also prefixes each chapter name with "1 - ", "2 - ", etc in case there are chapters with the same name.

#!/usr/bin/env python
import os
import re
import pprint
import sys
import subprocess as sp
from os.path import basename
from subprocess import *
from optparse import OptionParser

def parseChapters(filename):
  chapters = []
  command = [ "ffmpeg", '-i', filename]
  output = ""
  m = None
  title = None
  chapter_match = None
  try:
    # ffmpeg requires an output file and so it errors
    # when it does not get one so we need to capture stderr,
    # not stdout.
    output = sp.check_output(command, stderr=sp.STDOUT, universal_newlines=True)
  except CalledProcessError, e:
    output = e.output

  num = 1

  for line in iter(output.splitlines()):
    x = re.match(r".*title.*: (.*)", line)
    print "x:"
    pprint.pprint(x)

    print "title:"
    pprint.pprint(title)

    if x == None:
      m1 = re.match(r".*Chapter #(\d+:\d+): start (\d+\.\d+), end (\d+\.\d+).*", line)
      title = None
    else:
      title = x.group(1)

    if m1 != None:
      chapter_match = m1

    print "chapter_match:"
    pprint.pprint(chapter_match)

    if title != None and chapter_match != None:
      m = chapter_match
      pprint.pprint(title)
    else:
      m = None

    if m != None:
      chapters.append({ "name": `num` + " - " + title, "start": m.group(2), "end": m.group(3)})
      num += 1

  return chapters

def getChapters():
  parser = OptionParser(usage="usage: %prog [options] filename", version="%prog 1.0")
  parser.add_option("-f", "--file",dest="infile", help="Input File", metavar="FILE")
  (options, args) = parser.parse_args()
  if not options.infile:
    parser.error('Filename required')
  chapters = parseChapters(options.infile)
  fbase, fext = os.path.splitext(options.infile)
  path, file = os.path.split(options.infile)
  newdir, fext = os.path.splitext( basename(options.infile) )

  os.mkdir(path + "/" + newdir)

  for chap in chapters:
    chap['name'] = chap['name'].replace('/',':')
    chap['name'] = chap['name'].replace("'","\'")
    print "start:" +  chap['start']
    chap['outfile'] = path + "/" + newdir + "/" + re.sub("[^-a-zA-Z0-9_.():' ]+", '', chap['name']) + fext
    chap['origfile'] = options.infile
    print chap['outfile']
  return chapters

def convertChapters(chapters):
  for chap in chapters:
    print "start:" +  chap['start']
    print chap
    command = [
        "ffmpeg", '-i', chap['origfile'],
        '-vcodec', 'copy',
        '-acodec', 'copy',
        '-ss', chap['start'],
        '-to', chap['end'],
        chap['outfile']]
    output = ""
    try:
      # ffmpeg requires an output file and so it errors
      # when it does not get one
      output = sp.check_output(command, stderr=sp.STDOUT, universal_newlines=True)
    except CalledProcessError, e:
      output = e.output
      raise RuntimeError("command '{}' return with error (code {}): {}".format(e.cmd, e.returncode, e.output))

if __name__ == '__main__':
  chapters = getChapters()
  convertChapters(chapters)

This took a good bit to figure out since I'm definitely NOT a Python guy. It's also inelegant as there were many hoops to jump through since it is processing the metadata line by line. (Ie, the title and chapter data are found in separate loops through the metadata output)

But it works and it should save you a lot of time. It did for me!

  • This worked great, thanks! – JP. Feb 22 '17 at 16:01
  • @JP. Glad to hear it! – clifgriffin Feb 23 '17 at 16:27
  • This worked well once I ran ffmpeg -i independently, to determine the format of my file's metadata. I had to tinker with the regex since my chapters weren't of the format Chapter #dd:dd. It would be good to try and make your regex more robust :-) – alexw Apr 6 '17 at 1:25
  • Your way of determing the path only works for when using an absolute path for the input file. Otherwise the variable path is empty and therefore the path of the output files is a directory inside the document root, for example /test for the input file test.mp4. – epR8GaYuh Feb 12 at 12:26
  • thanks @clifgriffin, I liked your version and modified it to work in Python 3. I also cleaned up the imports and added leading zeroes to chapter number gist.github.com/showerbeer/97c1f31770572d05738cd2b74167f8a4 – Norsk Oct 12 at 11:00

I wanted a few extra things like:

  • extracting the cover
  • using the chapter name as filename
  • prefixing a counter to the filename with leading zeros, so alphabetical ordering will work correctly in every software
  • making a playlist
  • modifying the metadata to include the chapter name
  • outputting all the files to a new directory based on metadata (year author - title)

Here's my script (I used the hint with ffprobe json output from Harry)

#!/bin/bash
input="input.aax"
EXT2="m4a"

json=$(ffprobe -activation_bytes secret -i "$input" -loglevel error -print_format json -show_format -show_chapters)
title=$(echo $json | jq -r ".format.tags.title")
count=$(echo $json | jq ".chapters | length")
target=$(echo $json | jq -r ".format.tags | .date + \" \" + .artist + \" - \" + .title")
mkdir "$target"

ffmpeg -activation_bytes secret -i $input -vframes 1 -f image2 "$target/cover.jpg"

echo "[playlist]
NumberOfEntries=$count" > "$target/0_Playlist.pls"

for i in $(seq -w 1 $count);
do
  j=$((10#$i))
  n=$(($j-1))
  start=$(echo $json | jq -r ".chapters[$n].start_time")
  end=$(echo $json | jq -r ".chapters[$n].end_time")
  name=$(echo $json | jq -r ".chapters[$n].tags.title")
  ffmpeg -activation_bytes secret -i $input -vn -acodec -map_chapters -1 copy -ss $start -to $end -metadata title="$title $name" "$target/$i $name.$EXT2"
  echo "File$j=$i $name.$EXT2" >> "$target/0_Playlist.pls"
done

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