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Since I'm making heavy use of reflective access to arrays in a project, I decided to compare the performance of array[index] vs java.lang.reflect.Array.get(array, index). While I anticipated, that reflective calls are quite a bit slower, I was surprised to see that they are between 10-16 times slower.

So I decided to write a simple utility method that does about the same as Array#get but receives the array at the given index by casting the object instead of using a native method (as does Array#get):

public static Object get(Object array, int index){
    Class<?> c = array.getClass();
    if (int[].class == c) {
        return ((int[])array)[index];
    } else if (float[].class == c) {
        return ((float[])array)[index];
    } else if (boolean[].class == c) {
        return ((boolean[])array)[index];
    } else if (char[].class == c) {
        return ((char[])array)[index];
    } else if (double[].class == c) {
        return ((double[])array)[index];
    } else if (long[].class == c) {
        return ((long[])array)[index];
    } else if (short[].class == c) {
        return ((short[])array)[index];
    } else if (byte[].class == c) {
        return ((byte[])array)[index];
    }
    return ((Object[])array)[index];
}

I believe that this method provides the same functionality as Array#get, with the notable difference of the thrown exceptions (e.g. a ClassCastException gets thrown instead of an IllegalArgumentException, if one calls the method with an Object that is no array.).

To my surprise, this utility method performs much better than Array#get.

Three questions:

  1. Do others here experience the same performance issues with Array#get, or is this perhaps a hardware/platform/Java-version issue (I tested with Java 8 on a dual core Windows 7 laptop)?
  2. Do I miss something concerning the functionality of the method Array#get? I.e. is there some functionality that must necessarily be implemented using a native call?
  3. Is there a specific reason, why Array#get was implemented using native methods, when the same functionality could have been implemented in pure Java with a much higher performance?

Test Classes and Results

The tests have been done using Caliper (latest Caliper from git necessary to compile the code). But for your convenience I also included a main method that performs a simplified test (you need to remove the Caliper annotations to make it compile).

TestClass:

import java.lang.reflect.Array;
import com.google.caliper.BeforeExperiment;
import com.google.caliper.Benchmark;

public class ArrayAtBenchmark {

    public static final class ArrayUtil {
        public static Object get(Object array, int index){
            Class<?> c = array.getClass();
            if (int[].class == c) {
                return ((int[])array)[index];
            } else if (float[].class == c) {
                return ((float[])array)[index];
            } else if (boolean[].class == c) {
                return ((boolean[])array)[index];
            } else if (char[].class == c) {
                return ((char[])array)[index];
            } else if (double[].class == c) {
                return ((double[])array)[index];
            } else if (long[].class == c) {
                return ((long[])array)[index];
            } else if (short[].class == c) {
                return ((short[])array)[index];
            } else if (byte[].class == c) {
                return ((byte[])array)[index];
            }
            return ((Object[])array)[index];
        }
    }

    private static final int ELEMENT_SIZE = 100;
    private Object[] objectArray;

    @BeforeExperiment
    public void setup(){
        objectArray = new Object[ELEMENT_SIZE];
        for (int i = 0; i < objectArray.length; i++) {
            objectArray[i] = new Object();
        }
    }

    @Benchmark
    public int ObjectArray_at(int reps){
        int dummy = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < ELEMENT_SIZE; j++) {
                dummy |= objectArray[j].hashCode();
            }
        }
        return dummy;
    }

    @Benchmark
    public int ObjectArray_Array_get(int reps){
        int dummy = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < ELEMENT_SIZE; j++) {
                dummy |= Array.get(objectArray, j).hashCode();
            }
        }
        return dummy;
    }

    @Benchmark
    public int ObjectArray_ArrayUtil_get(int reps){
        int dummy = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < reps; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < ELEMENT_SIZE; j++) {
                dummy |= ArrayUtil.get(objectArray, j).hashCode();
            }
        }
        return dummy;
    }

    // test method to use without Cailper
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ArrayAtBenchmark benchmark = new ArrayAtBenchmark();
        benchmark.setup();

        int warmup = 100000;
        // warm up 
        benchmark.ObjectArray_at(warmup);
        benchmark.ObjectArray_Array_get(warmup);
        benchmark.ObjectArray_ArrayUtil_get(warmup);

        int reps = 100000;

        long start = System.nanoTime();
        int temp = benchmark.ObjectArray_at(reps);
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        long time = (end-start)/reps;
        System.out.println("time for ObjectArray_at: " + time + " NS");

        start = System.nanoTime();
        temp |= benchmark.ObjectArray_Array_get(reps);
        end = System.nanoTime();
        time = (end-start)/reps;
        System.out.println("time for ObjectArray_Array_get: " + time + " NS");

        start = System.nanoTime();
        temp |= benchmark.ObjectArray_ArrayUtil_get(reps);
        end = System.nanoTime();
        time = (end-start)/reps;
        System.out.println("time for ObjectArray_ArrayUtil_get: " + time + " NS");
        if (temp == 0) {
            // sanity check to prevent JIT to optimize the test methods away
            System.out.println("result:" + result);
        }
    }
}

The Caliper results can be viewed here.

The results of the simplified main method look like this on my machine:

time for ObjectArray_at: 620 NS
time for ObjectArray_Array_get: 10525 NS
time for ObjectArray_ArrayUtil_get: 1287 NS

Additional information

  • Did you test your code with multi-dimensional arrays? – Aaron Digulla May 18 '15 at 14:54
  • Just wondering: why are you using reflection at all? My suspection would be that the just-in-time compiler is very good at optimizing "raw" array accesses; and anything that goes "reflection" is poorly/not at all optimized by the JIT. But that is guessing ... – GhostCat May 18 '15 at 14:54
  • @AaronDigulla yes I did - it turns out, that multi-dimensional arrays are instances or Object[]. – Balder May 18 '15 at 14:56
  • @Jägermeister Because I need to handle both Object arrays and primitive arrays with the same API – Balder May 18 '15 at 14:58
  • 5
    bugs.openjdk.java.net/browse/JDK-8051447 - also see the native implementation of Array.c: "TODO: Performance" ;-) – Marco13 May 18 '15 at 16:05
8

Yes, Array.get is slow in OpenJDK / Oracle JDK because it is implemented by a native method and is not optimized by JIT.

There is no special reason for Array.get to be native except that it has been so from the earliest releases of JDK (when JVM was not so good and there was no JIT at all). Moreover, there is a pure Java compatible implementation of java.lang.reflect.Array from GNU Classpath.

Currently (as of JDK 8u45) only Array.newInstance and Array.getLength are optimized (being JVM intrinsics). Looks like nobody really cared about performance of reflective get/set methods. But as @Marco13 noticed there is an open issue JDK-8051447 to improve the performance of Array.* methods somewhen in future.

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