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I have list of object with me. These objects are called WordPairs.

Example: ((WordPair1) (WordPair2)) and so on. I have a function extract their confidence values. I want to create another list with their confidence values. That list will have only numbers. At the end of this computation, I will be having a list of numbers that correspond to the list of WordPairs. I know how to create a basic list using cons. The problem here is that I have 500,000 word pairs and with recursive cons I would run into stack overflow pretty fast.

What can be the solution?

My naive solution is this:

(define (create-conf-list lst)
(define wp (car lst))
(define confidence (tv-conf (cog-tv wp)))
(if (not (null? (cdr lst)))
    (cons confidence (create-conf-list (cdr lst)))
    '()))

How can this be improved?

P.S: I am running into a Stack Overflow with this approach. I need a more efficient approach. I cannot think of how to insert tail recursion here.

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  • you use structure mutation to iteratively build a list in top-down manner, with the head sentinel trick for convenience. – Will Ness Dec 27 '15 at 22:14
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This looks like something you could do with "accumulate and reverse", since you want the result in the reverse order of what straight accumulation would produce:

  (define (helper ls acc)
    (define wp (car ls))
    (define confidence (tv-conf (cog-tv wp)))
    (if (null? (cdr ls))
        (reverse acc)
      (helper (cdr ls) (cons confidence acc))))

This is tail-recursive since the recursive case is only a call to the function itself - the result of the recursive call isn't used for anything else.
The reversal is needed because the cons in the accumulator builds the list in the reverse order.
(You might be tempted to use (append acc (list confidence)) to keep the list in the wanted order, but the append makes it very slow.)

Then you can call it from the "actual" function:

(define (create-conf-list lst)
  (helper lst '()))

Or you can roll the functions into one:

(define (create-conf-list lst)
  (define (helper ls acc)
    (define wp (car ls))
    (define confidence (tv-conf (cog-tv wp)))
    (if (null? (cdr ls))
        (reverse acc)
      (helper (cdr ls) (cons confidence acc))))
  (helper lst '()))

Side note:
You're dropping the last element of the confidences, but since you're at the optimising stage I assume that's what you want.
If it's not what you want, you should fix that bug before you think about optimisation.

Is this answer outdated?
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  • Sorry! I meant to check if list was null, not (cdr lst) – Rohit Shinde May 19 '15 at 8:00
  • And how is this tail recursion? Could you explain the code please? I am unable to figure out the tail recursion in this. – Rohit Shinde May 19 '15 at 8:11
  • Understood it! Thank you! – Rohit Shinde May 19 '15 at 8:45
  • What exactly is accumulation? Can you point me to some resource that explains accumulation? – Rohit Shinde May 26 '15 at 2:22
  • @RohitShinde Any book on functional programming in general, and Scheme in particular, when they discuss tail recursion. If you have "SICP" - The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (available for free online) - read the chapter concerning iterative processes. How to Design Programs ("HtDP") is also available online. – molbdnilo May 26 '15 at 8:00
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Mapping a list onto a corresponding list of values via a function is usually done using map.

(define (get-confidence-values list-of-word-pairs)
  (map (lambda (wp) (tv-conf (cog-tv wp)))
       list-of-word-pairs))
Is this answer outdated?
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3
  • ideone.com/10YDqG seems to show your approach is faster (probably because map is a built-in). – Will Ness May 20 '15 at 0:25
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    @WillNess 500,000 entities could cause a stack allocation issue if the stack frame is large. On the other hand if each object is 1000 bytes in size, that's still only half a gigabyte of allocation (or less than $1.00 worth of RAM). map is the sort of place where dropping down into C for implementation and using mutation internally for the sake of performance are probably reasonable. – ben rudgers May 20 '15 at 0:35
  • @WillNess That's why using map is "usually done". The other issue about "largeness" just takes time to get the hang of it's dependency on algorithmic efficiency. 30 is a lot if the algorithm has O(30!) and 2 million is nothing these days if the algorithm is O(n) as is the case when dealing with a list operation. – ben rudgers May 20 '15 at 1:18

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