5

The following code returns:

output.isPending?: true
output.isRejected?: false
output.isFulfilled?: false 

Why? I was expecting output.isRejected to be true.

<html>

<head>
    <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/q.js/0.9.7/q.js"></script>
    <script src="http://jasmine.github.io/2.3/lib/jasmine.js"></script>
</head>

<body>
</body>
<script>
var output, bar;

bar = {
    doSomethingAsync: function() {
        var d = Q.defer();
        d.resolve('result');
        return d.promise;
    }
};

function Foo(bar) {
    this._bar = bar;

    this.go = function() {
        var deferred = Q.defer();
        this._bar.doSomethingAsync()
            .then(onSuccess.bind(this, deferred));

        return deferred.promise;
    }
};

function onSuccess(deferred, result) {
    deferred.reject();
}

output = new Foo(bar).go()
    .finally(function() {
        console.log('output.isPending?:', output.isPending());
        console.log('output.isRejected?:', output.isRejected());
        console.log('output.isFulfilled?:', output.isFulfilled());
    });
</script>

</html>
0
5

Because output is not new Foo(bar).go(). It is assigned the result of the .finally() call, and will not be resolved untill the finally callback is done.

This will work as expected:

var output = new Foo(bar).go();
output.finally(function() {
    console.log('output.isPending?:', output.isPending());
    console.log('output.isRejected?:', output.isRejected());
    console.log('output.isFulfilled?:', output.isFulfilled());
});
1
0

I stand corrected a trivial delay function is unnecessary even for API's that are oblivious to promises. I can make sure the resolve or reject is always called, but after the promise itself is returned without delay. Here is an example:

var somePromise = function(path) {
    var deferred = q.defer();

    asyncFunction.request(path, function(result) {
        if (result.error === 0 && result.json !== null) {
            deferred.resolve(result);
        } else {
            deferred.reject(result || {error: -1, message: "bad things happened"});
        }
    });

    return deferred.promise;
};

exports.someCall = function(req,res) {
    somePromise('path')
        .then(function (result) {
            ... do action ...
        }).catch(function (error) {
            ... handle error ...
        }); 
};
6
  • 1
    There's no need to resolve or reject only after returning a promise. All callbacks are called asynchronously anyway, regardless when/how you resolve your promise. Using deferreds like this even looks a bit like the common antipattern. – Bergi May 19 '15 at 23:00
  • This code still allows promises to be chained, eg: exports.someCall = function(req,res) { somePromise('path') .then(function (result) { return somePromise('new path'); }).then(function (result) { ... do something else ... – Michael Shopsin May 20 '15 at 15:52
  • Yes it does, but the q.delay(1) is still unnecessary? – Bergi May 20 '15 at 16:01
  • As mentioned about converting an API to promises I need to call some very slow HTTP calls which do not have their own wrapper for promises. The delay allows me to build a list of expensive HTTP calls and then use q.allSettled to wait for the results to come in. – Michael Shopsin May 20 '15 at 18:54
  • 1
    I stand corrected, removing the q.delay(1) doesn't cause any problems. I have some bad habits left from the old C TCP API's. – Michael Shopsin May 20 '15 at 19:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.