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I know the beautiful one liner you can use in Python to determine if some input string is a palindrome, however, I want to be able to check if a list is a palindrome, e.g. [1,2,2,1] should return True and [1,2,3,4] should return False. I am passing the function list_palindrome three parameters - the list to check, the index of the first element, and the index of the last element.

So far I have:

def is_mirror(my_list,i1,i2):
    if len(my_list) <= 1:
        return True
    else:
        if my_list[i1] == my_list[i2]:
            return is_mirror(my_list[i1:i2],i1,i2)

But I am getting a IndexError: list index out of range, I think the base case is correct, however my logic is flawed for the recursive call. Any help as to how I can fix this?

  • 1
    I smell homework – teambob May 20 '15 at 4:25
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You can use slice in python like this way.

def isPalindrome(s):
    if len(s) <= 1:
        return True
    return s[0] == s[-1] and isPalindrome(s[1:-1])

Test:

>>> isPalindrome([1, 2, 3, 4])
False
>>> isPalindrome([1, 2, 2, 1])
True
>>> isPalindrome([1, 2, 3, 2, 1])
True

or you can avoid slicing and use index. i starts with 0, j starts with len(s) - 1.

Edited.

def isPalindrome(s, i, j):
    if i == j or j < i:
        return True

    return s[i] == s[j] and isPalindrome(s, i + 1, j - 1)

Test:

>>> isPalindrome([1, 2, 3, 4], 0, 3)
False
>>> isPalindrome([1, 2, 2, 1], 0, 3)
True
>>> isPalindrome([1, 2, 3, 2, 1], 0, 4)
True
  • 1
    I'm thinking that using the tmp is variable is less readable than just saying return s[i] == s[j] and isPalindrome(s, i+1, j-1) in your second variant. – DTing May 20 '15 at 4:46
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    I wanted to avoid the array slicing, just trying to take a new approach, thanks for showing me how to do it using the index values! – ASm May 20 '15 at 4:46
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Here's a recursive approach. The basic premise is that with each recursive step, you check if the first and last elements are equal. If so, chop them off, and pass the sublist into the recursive function again.

You will keep going deeper and deeper into your stack with a smaller and smaller list, until you hit your base case.

def is_mirror(my_list):
    if len(my_list) <= 1:
        return True
    else:
        if my_list[0] == my_list[-1]:
            return is_mirror(my_list[1:-1])
        else: 
            return False
  • It's a bit verbose, you don't need the else clauses since each block ends with a return statement. If you're dead set on having the else clauses there though, at least use elif. – Raniz May 20 '15 at 4:34
  • Yes, but if I changed that I would be essentially the same as your answer :) – Martin Konecny May 20 '15 at 4:35
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The problem is that you're shrinking the list but not changing the boundary parameters. You should do only one of these.

I suggest you drop the boundary parameters and shrink the list using slicing instead:

>>> def is_mirror(lst):
...   if not lst:
...      return True
...   return lst[0] == lst[-1] and is_mirror(lst[1:-1])
... 
>>> is_mirror([1, 2, 3, 4])
False
>>> is_mirror([1, 2, 2, 1])
True
>>> is_mirror([])
True
>>> is_mirror([1])
True
>>> is_mirror([1, 3, 1])
True
  • 1
    You could also replace your base case with if not lst: to make it read nicer. – Blender May 20 '15 at 4:30

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