197

Simple question, if you use the Html Helper from ASP.NET MVC Framework 1 it is easy to set a default value on a textbox because there is an overload Html.TextBox(string name, object value). When I tried using the Html.TextBoxFor method, my first guess was to try the following which did not work:

<%: Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Age, new { value = "0"}) %>

Should I just stick with Html.TextBox(string, object) for now?

  • use this <%: Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Age, new { Value = "0"}) %> ,make a small change V capital in Value. – Mohan Singh Oct 14 '17 at 12:33

12 Answers 12

352

you can try this

<%= Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Age, new { @Value = "0"}) %>
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  • 49
    Curious to know why capital 'V' works and lowercase 'v' does not? Also, this solution overrides the model value for Age, even if one is present. – Derek Hunziker Sep 1 '10 at 23:46
  • 74
    value with small v is keyword for C# msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x9fsa0sw.aspx. So i think thats why it doesn't work. – Tassadaque Sep 2 '10 at 4:36
  • 3
    Upvoted the comment because one upvote for an answer this obscure and insightful seemed... inadequate. – ehdv Mar 29 '11 at 19:56
  • 9
    It is still curious that @value doesn't work. readonly is also a keyword for C# but @readonly works without any problems. – Diego May 30 '11 at 12:54
  • 16
    The html source in browser is <input Value="0" id="Age" name="Age" type="text" value="" /> when using @Value. There're both "Value" with "0" and "value" with "" in the input tag. – Ricky Dec 19 '11 at 9:22
59

This should work for MVC3 & MVC4

 @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Age, new { @Value = "12" }) 

If you want it to be a hidden field

 @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Age, new { @Value = "12",@type="hidden" }) 
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  • 21
    For hidden fields, just use @Html.HiddenFor(m => m.Age, new { @Value = "12" }) – Buginator Jun 27 '12 at 12:12
  • good one @Html.HiddenFor(m => m.Age, new { @Value = "12" }) not wokring – RollerCosta Sep 21 '12 at 7:43
  • And why would you hide an hard coded default value like this ? non sense – Antoine Pelletier Sep 18 '17 at 20:09
31

It turns out that if you don't specify the Model to the View method within your controller, it doesn't create a object for you with the default values.

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get)]
public ViewResult Create()
{
  // Loads default values
  Instructor i = new Instructor();
  return View("Create", i);
}

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Get)]
public ViewResult Create()
{
  // Does not load default values from instructor
  return View("Create");
}
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  • More likely it is MVC bug or feature, since Html.PasswordFor(m => m.Password, new { class = "form-control", value ="default" is rendered into almost the same html, and the "default" go to value being displayed successfully. For example, value=Model.Email works, but value=ViewBag.Email does work. So this accepted answer is better and cleaner, not so hacking. – ZZZ Oct 27 '14 at 13:01
  • What is Instructor? – Csaba Toth May 14 '16 at 18:32
20

The default value will be the value of your Model.Age property. That's kind of the whole point.

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  • 3
    Seems it is bad idea when model manages default values. What should be done when different default value needs for same collection of model items? – RredCat Nov 3 '10 at 17:52
  • @RredCat Agreed, this muddies the separation of the UI layer – Evan M May 3 '12 at 19:28
17

You can simply do :

<%= Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Age, new { @Value = "0"}) %>

or better, this will switch to default value '0' if the model is null, for example if you have the same view for both editing and creating :

@Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Age, new { @Value = (Model==null) ? "0" : Model.Age.ToString() })
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11

value="0" will set defualt value for @Html.TextBoxfor

its case sensitive "v" should be capital

Below is working example:

@Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Nights, 
    new { @min = "1", @max = "10", @type = "number", @id = "Nights", @name = "Nights", Value = "1" })
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9

This work for me

@Html.TextBoxFor(model => model.Age, htmlAttributes: new { @Value = "" })
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  • +1 for the named parameter that is especially helpful in copy/pastable code and one that uses a method with many overloads – Ekus Apr 10 '19 at 20:51
8

Using @Value is a hack, because it outputs two attributes, e.g.:

<input type="..." Value="foo" value=""/>

You should do this instead:

@Html.TextBox(Html.NameFor(p => p.FirstName).ToString(), "foo")
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8

Here's how I solved it. This works if you also use this for editing.

@Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Age, new { Value = Model.Age.ToString() ?? "0" })
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  • if Age is null.. you're going to get a null pointer exception because the ?? is going to attempt to check the return of the ToString(). – eaglei22 Apr 12 '16 at 15:50
  • @eaglei22 Nullable<T>.ToString() will return an empty string if the value is null. – Tom Lint Oct 17 '17 at 7:34
  • thank you for showing how to model bind in an anonymous object – NoughT Mar 18 '19 at 7:46
7

this worked for me , in this way we setting the default value to empty string

@Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Id, new { @Value = "" })
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  • 2
    While this code may answer the question, it would be better to include some context, explaining how it works and when to use it. Code-only answers are not useful in the long run. – Bono Jan 30 '16 at 10:33
  • @Bono added some comments – eric_eri Feb 1 '16 at 16:45
5

If you have a partial page form for both editing and adding, then the trick I use to default value to 0 is to do the following:

@Html.TextBox("Age", Model.Age ?? 0)

That way it will be 0 if unset or the actual age if it exists.

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  • 1
    If Age is an int, that won't work; It would need to be a nullable int. – Justin Self Feb 15 '13 at 14:56
0

Try this also, that is remove new { } and replace it with string.

<%: Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.Age,"0") %>
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