7

I understand why you cannot do:

void(*fp)(void) = &function;
function_taking_void_pointer((void*)fp);

because the lengths of the types may be different.

but is there anything wrong with adding annother layer of indirection:

void(*fp)(void) = &function;
void(**fpp)(void) = &fp;
function_taking_void_pointer((void*)fpp)

My thinking behind this: The pointer to the function pointer should be pointing to data memory and therefore should have the same length as the void* type.

So how wrong am I?

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    God help whoever has to read this code when you're done with it... Commented May 20, 2015 at 13:21
  • Of course void pointer are made for these kinds of 'hacks'. BUT I guess its definitly no good design to pass a function pointer to a function that maybe was made for the purpose of handling different datatypes like, int*,float*,double*, struct whatever* etc. So I think you better write a function that arguments are pointer to functions.
    – ckruczek
    Commented May 20, 2015 at 13:28
  • 1
    Ok, then forget about such weired stuff.
    – ckruczek
    Commented May 20, 2015 at 13:30
  • 1
    Keep in mind that a function pointer may be stored in any other function pointer (via casting) as long as it it cast back to the correct function pointer type before being used to make a function call. So you can use a void (*)(void) (or whatever function pointer type) as a kind of "void*" for function pointers. Commented May 20, 2015 at 14:31
  • 1
    Also, POSIX sort of requires that a function pointer can be round-tripped through a void* because of how the dlsym() function is specified. Commented May 20, 2015 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

4

You are right that all pointer types are object types:

N1570 6.3.5 Types, paragraph 20, fifth list item:

  • A pointer type may be derived from a function type or an object type, called the referenced type. A pointer type describes an object whose value provides a reference to an entity of the referenced type. A pointer type derived from the referenced type T is sometimes called ‘‘pointer to T’’. The construction of a pointer type from a referenced type is called ‘‘pointer type derivation’’. A pointer type is a complete object type.

But pointers to object types don't necessarily have same size as void* (6.2.5 p28).

  1. A pointer to void shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as a pointer to a character type.48) Similarly, pointers to qualified or unqualified versions of compatible types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements. All pointers to structure types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. All pointers to union types shall have the same representation and alignment requirements as each other. Pointers to other types need not have the same representation or alignment requirements.

However, they can all be converted to void* (6.3.2.3 p1):

  1. A pointer to void may be converted to or from a pointer to any object type. A pointer to any object type may be converted to a pointer to void and back again; the result shall compare equal to the original pointer.
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    The standard doesn't say anything about converting function pointer types to void *; you explicitly quote what it says: A pointer to void may be converted to or from a pointer to any object type. Functions are not objects; that's why it says A pointer type may be derived from a function type or an object type; the two sets of types (pointers to objects and pointers to functions) are not the same and are not necessarily convertible. POSIX even removed the text that used to provide a get-out clause. There are machines where function pointers are very elaborate (big, complex). Commented May 20, 2015 at 14:35
  • @JonathanLeffler Yes, that is what my answer says. Keep in mind that question asked about pointer to function pointer. And that is object type and can be converted to void*.
    – user694733
    Commented May 21, 2015 at 6:41
-4

This code snippet is wrong.


    void(*fp)(void) = &function;
    function_taking_void_pointer((void*)fp);

In C/C++ the function name will be relocated to a specific address in linking stage, so you cannot use & before a function name. In addition function name is not a variable in C/C++, so you also cannot try to get its address.

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    If foo() is a function, you can use &foo. It's just the same as using foo itself.
    – user3185968
    Commented May 20, 2015 at 13:29
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    Same as with statically allocated arrays. You can include the & and you can omit the &. The compiler will interpret it the same way. Commented May 20, 2015 at 14:34

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