3

I'm on a AIX box and need a program that when used after a pipe does nothing.

I'll be more exact. I need something like this:

if [ $NOSORT ] ; then
    SORTEXEC="/usr/bin/doesnothing"
else
    SORTEXEC="/usr/bin/sort -u"
fi
# BIG WHILE HERE
do

done | SORTEXEC

I tried to use tee > /dev/null, but I don't know if there is another better option available.

Can anybody help with a more appropriate program then tee?

Thanks in advance

  • You need done | "$SORTEXEC" (where the double quotes may or may not be advisable -- you cannot then have a command with arguments in the variable, but in this particular scenario you hardly want that anyway; and if you really do, putting the complex command in a function is probably a good idea for many reasons. See also mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/050). – tripleee May 20 '15 at 14:02
2

Use tee as follows:

somecommand | tee

This just copies stdin to stdout.

Or uUse true or false. All they do is exit EXIT_SUCCESS or EXIT_FAILURE.

somecommand | true

Notice, every output to stdout from somecommand is dropped.

Another option is to use cat:

somecommand | cat
  • although the true command droped stdout, the cat and tee command worked very well. – Fabio A. Mazzarino May 20 '15 at 15:05
  • I'd go with the cat solution for a generic drop-in no-op replacement for a pipeline filtering stage. – Kusalananda May 27 '15 at 18:50
4

: is the portable, do-nothing command in the POSIX specification.

if [ "$NOSORT" ] ; then
    SORTEXEC=:
else
    SORTEXEC="/usr/bin/sort -u"
fi 

: is guaranteed to be a shell built-in in a POSIX-compliant shell; other commands that behave similarly may be external programs that require a new process be started to ignore the output.

However, as tripleee pointed out, strings are meant to hold data, not code. Define a shell function instead:

if [ "$NOSORT" ]; then
    SORTEXEC () { : ; }
else
    SORTEXEC () { /usr/bin/sort -u; }
fi

while ...; do
    ...
done | SORTEXEC
  • Better solution than mine +1^^ – chaos May 20 '15 at 13:53
  • the : command did not work on ksh. – Fabio A. Mazzarino May 20 '15 at 15:05
  • Define "did not work". echo foo | : seems to work as intended, at least in the ksh that ships with Mac OS X. – chepner May 20 '15 at 15:16

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