5

I want to add elements to an empty list on the fly. Each element in the list should be named automatically after a set of variables which value will vary.

However, I cannot seem to find a way to name list elements on the fly without getting errors. Consider the example below:

L <- list()

var1 <- "wood"
var2 <- 1.0
var3 <- "z4"

varname <- paste(var1, as.character(var2), var3, sep="_")

# This works fine:
L$"wood_1_z4" <- c(0,1)
L$"wood_1_z4"
0 1

# This doesn't!!
L$paste(var1, as.character(var2), var3, sep="_") <- c(0,1)
Error in L$paste(var1, as.character(var2), var3, sep = "_") <- c(0, 1) : 
  invalid function in complex assignment

# Ths doesn't either ... 
L$eval(parse(text = "varname")) <- c(0,1)
Error in L$eval(parse(text = "varname")) <- c(0, 1) : 
target of assignment expands to non-language object

Is there a way to do this?

  • 4
    Use [[: L[[paste(var1, as.character(var2), var3, sep="_")]]<-c(0,1) – nicola May 20 '15 at 14:02
  • What about if you assign values to names(L)? – Roman Luštrik May 20 '15 at 14:09
  • 1
    $ doesn't do any evaluation on the right hand side, hence the errors. – Alex A. May 20 '15 at 14:22
7

You cannot assign to paste() using the <- operator (and I believe this is true for the eval() function as well). Instead, you need to either use the [[ operator or use the names() function. You can do this like so:

L <- list()
var1 <- "wood"
var2 <- 1.0
var3 <- "z4"
varname <- paste(var1, as.character(var2), var3, sep="_")

# Using [[
L[[varname]] <- c(0,1)

> L
$wood_1_z4
[1] 0 1

# Using names()
L[[1]] <- c(0,1)
names(L)[1] <- varname

> L
$wood_1_z4
[1] 0 1

A more effective way to do this might be to use a function that both creates the value and names the list element, or even one that just creates the value - if you then use sapply you can name each list element using arguments from the call to your function and the USE.NAMES options.

In a general sense, R isn't really well-optimized for growing lists over time when the final size and structure of the list aren't well-known. While it can be done, a more "R-ish" way to do it would be to figure out the structure ahead of time.

  • 1
    While it's true that you can't assign to paste and eval, the reason why it isn't working is because the primitive $ doesn't evaluate on the right hand side. Per the comments in the C code for $: "We need to be sure to only evaluate the first argument. The second will be a symbol that needs to be matched, not evaluated." – Alex A. May 20 '15 at 14:25

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