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How do I prevent the GC from provoking copy-on-write, when I fork my process ? I have recently been analyzing the garbage collector's behavior in Ruby, due to some memory issues that I encountered in my program (I run out of memory on my 60core 0.5Tb machine even for fairly small tasks). For me this really limits the usefulness of ruby for running programs on multicore servers. I would like to present my experiments and results here.

The issue arises when the garbage collector runs during forking. I have investigated three cases that illustrate the issue.

Case 1: We allocate a lot of objects (strings no longer than 20 bytes) in the memory using an array. The strings are created using a random number and string formatting. When the process forks and we force the GC to run in the child, all the shared memory goes private, causing a duplication of the initial memory.

Case 2: We allocate a lot of objects (strings) in the memory using an array, but the string is created using the rand.to_s function, hence we remove the formatting of the data compared to the previous case. We end up with a smaller amount of memory being used, presumably due to less garbage. When the process forks and we force the GC to run in the child, only part of the memory goes private. We have a duplication of the initial memory, but to a smaller extent.

Case 3: We allocate fewer objects compared to before, but the objects are bigger, such that the amount of memory allocated stays the same as in the previous cases. When the process forks and we force the GC to run in the child all the memory stays shared, i.e. no memory duplication.

Here I paste the Ruby code that has been used for these experiments. To switch between cases you only need to change the “option” value in the memory_object function. The code was tested using Ruby 2.2.2, 2.2.1, 2.1.3, 2.1.5 and 1.9.3 on an Ubuntu 14.04 machine.

Sample output for case 1:

ruby version 2.2.2 
 proces   pid log                   priv_dirty   shared_dirty 
 Parent  3897 post alloc                   38            0 
 Parent  3897 4 fork                        0           37 
 Child   3937 4 initial                     0           37 
 Child   3937 8 empty GC                   35            5 

The exact same code has been written in Python and in all cases the CoW works perfectly fine.

Sample output for case 1:

python version 2.7.6 (default, Mar 22 2014, 22:59:56) 
[GCC 4.8.2] 
 proces   pid log                   priv_dirty shared_dirty 
 Parent  4308 post alloc                35             0 
 Parent  4308 4 fork                     0            35 
 Child   4309 4 initial                  0            35 
 Child   4309 10 empty GC                1            34 

Ruby code

$start_time=Time.new

# Monitor use of Resident and Virtual memory.
class Memory

    shared_dirty = '.+?Shared_Dirty:\s+(\d+)'
    priv_dirty = '.+?Private_Dirty:\s+(\d+)'
    MEM_REGEXP = /#{shared_dirty}#{priv_dirty}/m

    # get memory usage
    def self.get_memory_map( pids)
        memory_map = {}
        memory_map[ :pids_found] = {}
        memory_map[ :shared_dirty] = 0
        memory_map[ :priv_dirty] = 0

        pids.each do |pid|
            begin
                lines = nil
                lines = File.read( "/proc/#{pid}/smaps")
            rescue
                lines = nil
            end
            if lines
                lines.scan(MEM_REGEXP) do |shared_dirty, priv_dirty|
                    memory_map[ :pids_found][pid] = true
                    memory_map[ :shared_dirty] += shared_dirty.to_i
                    memory_map[ :priv_dirty] += priv_dirty.to_i
                end
            end
        end
        memory_map[ :pids_found] = memory_map[ :pids_found].keys
        return memory_map
    end

    # get the processes and get the value of the memory usage
    def self.memory_usage( )
        pids   = [ $$]
        result = self.get_memory_map( pids)

        result[ :pids]   = pids
        return result
    end

    # print the values of the private and shared memories
    def self.log( process_name='', log_tag="")
        if process_name == "header"
            puts " %-6s %5s %-12s %10s %10s\n" % ["proces", "pid", "log", "priv_dirty", "shared_dirty"]
        else
            time = Time.new - $start_time
            mem = Memory.memory_usage( )
            puts " %-6s %5d %-12s %10d %10d\n" % [process_name, $$, log_tag, mem[:priv_dirty]/1000, mem[:shared_dirty]/1000]
        end
    end
end

# function to delay the processes a bit
def time_step( n)
    while Time.new - $start_time < n
        sleep( 0.01)
    end
end

# create an object of specified size. The option argument can be changed from 0 to 2 to visualize the behavior of the GC in various cases
#
# case 0 (default) : we make a huge array of small objects by formatting a string
# case 1 : we make a huge array of small objects without formatting a string (we use the to_s function)
# case 2 : we make a smaller array of big objects
def memory_object( size, option=1)
    result = []
    count = size/20

    if option > 3 or option < 1
        count.times do
            result << "%20.18f" % rand
        end
    elsif option == 1
        count.times do
            result << rand.to_s
        end
    elsif option == 2
        count = count/10
        count.times do
            result << ("%20.18f" % rand)*30
        end
    end

    return result
end

##### main #####

puts "ruby version #{RUBY_VERSION}"

GC.disable

# print the column headers and first line
Memory.log( "header")

# Allocation of memory
big_memory = memory_object( 1000 * 1000 * 10)

Memory.log( "Parent", "post alloc")

lab_time = Time.new - $start_time
if lab_time < 3.9
    lab_time = 0
end

# start the forking
pid = fork do
    time = 4
    time_step( time + lab_time)
    Memory.log( "Child", "#{time} initial")

    # force GC when nothing happened
    GC.enable; GC.start; GC.disable

    time = 8
    time_step( time + lab_time)
    Memory.log( "Child", "#{time} empty GC")

    sleep( 1)
    STDOUT.flush
    exit!
end

time = 4
time_step( time + lab_time)
Memory.log( "Parent", "#{time} fork")

# wait for the child to finish
Process.wait( pid)

Python code

import re
import time
import os
import random
import sys
import gc

start_time=time.time()

# Monitor use of Resident and Virtual memory.
class Memory:   

    def __init__(self):
        self.shared_dirty = '.+?Shared_Dirty:\s+(\d+)'
        self.priv_dirty = '.+?Private_Dirty:\s+(\d+)'
        self.MEM_REGEXP = re.compile("{shared_dirty}{priv_dirty}".format(shared_dirty=self.shared_dirty, priv_dirty=self.priv_dirty), re.DOTALL)

    # get memory usage
    def get_memory_map(self, pids):
        memory_map = {}
        memory_map[ "pids_found" ] = {}
        memory_map[ "shared_dirty" ] = 0
        memory_map[ "priv_dirty" ] = 0

        for pid in pids:
            try:
                lines = None

                with open( "/proc/{pid}/smaps".format(pid=pid), "r" ) as infile:
                    lines = infile.read()
            except:
                lines = None

            if lines:
                for shared_dirty, priv_dirty in re.findall( self.MEM_REGEXP, lines ):
                    memory_map[ "pids_found" ][pid] = True
                    memory_map[ "shared_dirty" ] += int( shared_dirty )
                    memory_map[ "priv_dirty" ] += int( priv_dirty )     

        memory_map[ "pids_found" ] = memory_map[ "pids_found" ].keys()
        return memory_map

    # get the processes and get the value of the memory usage   
    def memory_usage( self):
        pids   = [ os.getpid() ]
        result = self.get_memory_map( pids)

        result[ "pids" ]   = pids

        return result

    # print the values of the private and shared memories
    def log( self, process_name='', log_tag=""):
        if process_name == "header":
            print " %-6s %5s %-12s %10s %10s" % ("proces", "pid", "log", "priv_dirty", "shared_dirty")
        else:
            global start_time
            Time = time.time() - start_time
            mem = self.memory_usage( )
            print " %-6s %5d %-12s %10d %10d" % (process_name, os.getpid(), log_tag, mem["priv_dirty"]/1000, mem["shared_dirty"]/1000)

# function to delay the processes a bit
def time_step( n):
    global start_time
    while (time.time() - start_time) < n:
        time.sleep( 0.01)

# create an object of specified size. The option argument can be changed from 0 to 2 to visualize the behavior of the GC in various cases
#
# case 0 (default) : we make a huge array of small objects by formatting a string
# case 1 : we make a huge array of small objects without formatting a string (we use the to_s function)
# case 2 : we make a smaller array of big objects                                       
def memory_object( size, option=2):
    count = size/20

    if option > 3 or option < 1:
        result = [ "%20.18f"% random.random() for i in xrange(count) ]

    elif option == 1:
        result = [ str( random.random() ) for i in xrange(count) ]

    elif option == 2:
        count = count/10
        result = [ ("%20.18f"% random.random())*30 for i in xrange(count) ]

    return result

##### main #####

print "python version {version}".format(version=sys.version)

memory = Memory()

gc.disable()

# print the column headers and first line
memory.log( "header")   # Print the headers of the columns

# Allocation of memory
big_memory = memory_object( 1000 * 1000 * 10)   # Allocate memory

memory.log( "Parent", "post alloc")

lab_time = time.time() - start_time
if lab_time < 3.9:
    lab_time = 0

# start the forking
pid = os.fork()     # fork the process
if pid == 0:
    Time = 4
    time_step( Time + lab_time)
    memory.log( "Child", "{time} initial".format(time=Time))

    # force GC when nothing happened
    gc.enable(); gc.collect(); gc.disable();

    Time = 10
    time_step( Time + lab_time)
    memory.log( "Child", "{time} empty GC".format(time=Time))

    time.sleep( 1)

    sys.exit(0)

Time = 4
time_step( Time + lab_time)
memory.log( "Parent", "{time} fork".format(time=Time))

# Wait for child process to finish
os.waitpid( pid, 0)

EDIT

Indeed, calling the GC several times before forking the process solves the issue and I am quite surprised. I have also run the code using Ruby 2.0.0 and the issue doesn't even appear, so it must be related to this generational GC just like you mentioned. However, if I call the memory_object function without assigning the output to any variables (I am only creating garbage), then the memory is duplicated. The amount of memory that is copied depends on the amount of garbage that I create - the more garbage, the more memory becomes private.

Any ideas how I can prevent this ?

Here are some results

Running the GC in 2.0.0

ruby version 2.0.0
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent  3664 post alloc           67          0
 Parent  3664 4 fork                1         69
 Child   3700 4 initial             1         69
 Child   3700 8 empty GC            6         65

Calling memory_object( 1000*1000) in the child

ruby version 2.0.0
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent  3703 post alloc           67          0
 Parent  3703 4 fork                1         70
 Child   3739 4 initial             1         70
 Child   3739 8 empty GC           15         56

Calling memory_object( 1000*1000*10)

ruby version 2.0.0
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent  3743 post alloc           67          0
 Parent  3743 4 fork                1         69
 Child   3779 4 initial             1         69
 Child   3779 8 empty GC           89          5
6
  • That’s amazingly cute. What is the question after all? May 20, 2015 at 15:40
  • 2
    Why the troll-like comment? The question is the first line of the post. May 20, 2015 at 16:43
  • Very interesting question, just thought maybe this due to lots of bitmap tables changing during gc... so it happens that every malloc page contains it and thus being copied on write. Will play with it later. May 20, 2015 at 18:14
  • See Never create Ruby strings longer than 23 characters - you may be getting bit by the fact that Ruby stores string values on strings <24 bytes long directly on the RValue, rather than on the heap. That might explain why your larger strings remain shared while smaller ones get copied. May 21, 2015 at 16:25
  • excellent first question thomas, welcome to stack Jun 16, 2015 at 14:06

1 Answer 1

2

UPD2

Suddenly figured out why all the memory is going private if you format the string -- you generate garbage during formatting, having GC disabled, then enable GC, and you've got holes of released objects in your generated data. Then you fork, and new garbage starts to occupy these holes, the more garbage - more private pages.

So i added a cleanup function to run GC each 2000 cycles (just enabling lazy GC didn't help):

count.times do |i|
  cleanup(i)
  result << "%20.18f" % rand
end

#......snip........#

def cleanup(i)
      if ((i%2000).zero?)
        GC.enable; GC.start; GC.disable
      end
end   

##### main #####

Which resulted in(with generating memory_object( 1000 * 1000 * 10) after fork):

RUBY_GC_HEAP_INIT_SLOTS=600000 ruby gc-test.rb 0
ruby version 2.2.0
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent  2501 post alloc           35          0
 Parent  2501 4 fork                0         35
 Child   2503 4 initial             0         35
 Child   2503 8 empty GC           28         22

Yes, it affects performance, but only before forking, i.e. increase load time in your case.


UPD1

Just found criteria by which ruby 2.2 sets old object bits, it's 3 GC's, so if you add following before forking:

GC.enable; 3.times {GC.start}; GC.disable
# start the forking

you will get(the option is 1 in command line):

$ RUBY_GC_HEAP_INIT_SLOTS=600000 ruby gc-test.rb 1
ruby version 2.2.0
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent  2368 post alloc           31          0
 Parent  2368 4 fork                1         34
 Child   2370 4 initial             1         34
 Child   2370 8 empty GC            2         32

But this needs to be further tested concerning the behavior of such objects on future GC's, at least after 100 GC's :old_objects remains constant, so i suppose it should be OK

Log with GC.stat is here


By the way there's also option RGENGC_OLD_NEWOBJ_CHECK to create old objects from the beginning, but i doubt it's a good idea, but may be useful for a particular case.

First answer

My proposition in the comment above was wrong, actually bitmap tables are the savior.

(option = 1)

ruby version 2.0.0
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent 14807 post alloc           27          0
 Parent 14807 4 fork                0         27
 Child  14809 4 initial             0         27
 Child  14809 8 empty GC            6         25 # << almost everything stays shared <<

Also had by hand and tested Ruby Enterprise Edition it's only half better than worst cases.

ruby version 1.8.7
 proces   pid log          priv_dirty shared_dirty
 Parent 15064 post alloc           86          0
 Parent 15064 4 fork                2         84
 Child  15065 4 initial             2         84
 Child  15065 8 empty GC           40         46

(I made the script run strictly 1 GC, by increasing RUBY_GC_HEAP_INIT_SLOTS to 600k)

11
  • Seems like this little clean up helps a bit. But if we create a memory object in the child process now, for instance like this memory_object( 1000 * 1000 * 10), then the memory will still be duplicated. Any idea why ? It happens even if we simply call the above method without assigning the output to a variable. May 22, 2015 at 7:28
  • just did some tests - if I allocate to big_memory2 the memory stays almost shared: 31/24 (priv/shared pages), same for call without assignment: 27/24, if i overwrite big_memory first GC starts cleaning up old references(that was shared during forking) so it results to 50/1, almost nothing shared. So it seems ruby marking objects as free and pages as "tomb", this memory will be reused when you will allocate further object. Look at this diff May 22, 2015 at 11:23
  • By allocating to big_memory in the child, then running gc and allocating to big_memory2 same amount of memory, i've got 56/1, so about 21 out of 27 pages was reused for new allocation. May 22, 2015 at 11:31
  • So just be careful when removing references to the data that was allocated before fork - it will be copied before actual release of memory - either free it partially and gradually, or select data that won't need to be discarded. May 22, 2015 at 11:44
  • With option=0 i'm getting 11/63 normally, and 97/1 if i allocate to big_memory, then free and allocate to big_memory2. But for call without assignment no - 87/4... will dig in later. May 22, 2015 at 12:14

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