13

Existing answers I've found are all based on from_str (such as Reading in user input from console once efficiently), but apparently from_str(x) has changed into x.parse() in Rust 1.0. As a newbie, it's not obvious how the original solution should be adapted taking this change into account.

As of Rust 1.0, what is the easiest way to get an integer input from the user?

33

Here is a version with all optional type annotations and error handling which may be useful for beginners like me:

use std::io;

fn main() {
    let mut input_text = String::new();
    io::stdin()
        .read_line(&mut input_text)
        .expect("failed to read from stdin");

    let trimmed = input_text.trim();
    match trimmed.parse::<u32>() {
        Ok(i) => println!("your integer input: {}", i),
        Err(..) => println!("this was not an integer: {}", trimmed),
    };
}
  • what about the use of unwrap()? how do you handle parse errors, and reporting them to stderr? – zero_cool Mar 30 '18 at 23:25
9

Probably the easiest part would be to use the text_io crate and write:

#[macro_use]
extern crate text_io;

fn main() {
    // read until a whitespace and try to convert what was read into an i32
    let i: i32 = read!();
    println!("Read in: {}", i);
}

If you need to read more than one value simultaneously, you might need to use Rust nightly.

See also:

  • I think it does run on stable if you only need to read one value at a time. – Vladimir Matveev May 20 '15 at 17:42
  • text_io dev here. @VladimirMatveev is right, text_io runs on stable if you don't read tuples but just a single value per read!() invocation. It actually requires nightly for multiple values. I'll update the github description. – oli_obk May 20 '15 at 18:50
  • Is there a better option now? After 3 years of Rust being out, I would assume there would be better ways of inputting values into integer variables. The solution suggested is what I encountered in the rust book, but its lengthy and feels a bit overkill for input. The text_io suggestion is great, but I'm not able to print statements out from functions before using read!() – joe_04_04 Mar 20 '18 at 9:01
  • @joe_04_04 What do you mean by "print statements out from functions before using read!() ? – Daniel Fath Mar 20 '18 at 12:05
  • @DanielFath, if I use println!() before trying to use read!() from text_io, items that are supposed to print from println!() do not get printed until after the read!() method. – joe_04_04 Mar 21 '18 at 5:15
7

Here are a few possibilities (Rust 1.7):

use std::io;

fn main() {
    let mut n = String::new();
    io::stdin()
        .read_line(&mut n)
        .expect("failed to read input.");
    let n: i32 = n.trim().parse().expect("invalid input");
    println!("{:?}", n);

    let mut n = String::new();
    io::stdin()
        .read_line(&mut n)
        .expect("failed to read input.");
    let n = n.trim().parse::<i32>().expect("invalid input");
    println!("{:?}", n);

    let mut n = String::new();
    io::stdin()
        .read_line(&mut n)
        .expect("failed to read input.");
    if let Ok(n) = n.trim().parse::<i32>() {
        println!("{:?}", n);
    }
}

These spare you the ceremony of pattern matching without depending on extra libraries.

  • 1
    Come on, it's clearly different, and a complete answer makes it easier for the reader. – qed Apr 12 '16 at 14:21
  • It looks pretty identical to the accepted answer to me. – Shepmaster Apr 12 '16 at 14:22
  • Yeah, you have to get a string from the user and store that in a variable, that part is the same. The parsing part is more concise, as explained in my answer. – qed Apr 12 '16 at 14:44
  • The parsing part is more concise — a comment along the lines of "use Option::expect instead of match to be more concise and fail in cases of error" would be equivalent. a complete answer makes it easier for the reader — this answer is missing the required use std::io and fn main that the accepted answer has and a true beginner would want. – Shepmaster Apr 12 '16 at 14:51
  • 2
    To be clear, feel free to leave the answer, other people may find it useful and upvote it. So long as there's prose to describe why it's different and better, it's a valid answer! – Shepmaster Apr 12 '16 at 15:02
4

parse is more or less the same; it’s read_line that’s unpleasant now.

use std::io;

fn main() {
    let mut s = String::new();
    io::stdin().read_line(&mut s).unwrap();

    match s.trim_right().parse::<i32>() {
        Ok(i) => println!("{} + 5 = {}", i, i + 5),
        Err(_) => println!("Invalid number."),
    }
}
2

If you are looking for a way to read input for the purpose of competitive programming in websites like codechef or codeforces where you do not have access to text_io.

This is not a new way to read rather one mentioned in the above answers, I just modified it to suit my needs.

I use the following macro to read from stdin the different values:

use std::io;

#[allow(unused_macros)]
macro_rules! read {
    ($out:ident as $type:ty) => {
        let mut inner = String::new();
        io::stdin().read_line(&mut inner).expect("A String");
        let $out = inner.trim().parse::<$type>().expect("Parseble");
    };
}

#[allow(unused_macros)]
macro_rules! read_str {
    ($out:ident) => {
        let mut inner = String::new();
        io::stdin().read_line(&mut inner).expect("A String");
        let $out = inner.trim();
    };
}

#[allow(unused_macros)]
macro_rules! read_vec {
    ($out:ident as $type:ty) => {
        let mut inner = String::new();
        io::stdin().read_line(&mut inner).unwrap();
        let $out = inner
            .trim()
            .split_whitespace()
            .map(|s| s.parse::<$type>().unwrap())
            .collect::<Vec<$type>>();
    };
}

In main


fn main(){
   read!(x as u32);
   read!(y as f64);
   read!(z as char);
   println!("{} {} {}", x, y, z);

   read_vec!(v as u32); // Reads space separated integers and stops when newline is encountered.
   println!("{:?}", v);
}

NOTE: I am no Rust Expert, if you think there is a way to improve it, please let me know. It will help me, Thanks.

0

You can create an extension method if you want a simple syntax:

use std::error::Error;
use std::io;
use std::str::FromStr;

trait Input {
    fn my_read<T>(&mut self) -> io::Result<T>
    where
        T: FromStr,
        T::Err: Error + Send + Sync + 'static;
}

impl<R> Input for R where R: io::Read {
    fn my_read<T>(&mut self) -> io::Result<T>
    where
        T: FromStr,
        T::Err: Error + Send + Sync + 'static,
    {
        let mut buff = String::new();
        self.read_to_string(&mut buff)?;

        buff.trim()
            .parse()
            .map_err(|e| io::Error::new(io::ErrorKind::InvalidInput, e))
    }
}

// Usage:

fn main() -> io::Result<()> {
    let input: i32 = io::stdin().my_read()?;

    println!("{}", input);

    Ok(())
}

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