4

I'm attempting to create a constant that depends on another in the following way:

class Thingy {
 let paddingConstant = 13.0
 let paddingDict = ["padding": paddingConstant]
}

The bottom line gives me an error "Thingy.Type does not have a member named 'paddingConstant'".

Is it possible to declare a constant that depends on another?

2
2

As another solution you can use an outer struct for defining the constant (and other constants you might need):

struct Constants {
    static let paddingConstant = 13.0
}

and then use it in Thingy class:

class Thingy {
  let paddingDict = ["padding": Constants.paddingConstant]
}
8

Another solution is to declare this variable lazy. The advantage is that, unlike a calculated property, it does not perform the calculation every time you fetch its value; but the downside is that it cannot be a constant, unfortunately:

class Thingy {
    let paddingConstant = 13.0
    lazy var paddingDict : [String:Double] = 
        ["padding": self.paddingConstant]
}

I regard that limitation as a bug in the Swift language.

6

You can move paddingDict to the init:

class Thingy {
    let paddingConstant = 13.0
    let paddingDict : [String: Double]
    init() {
        paddingDict = ["padding": paddingConstant]
    }
}
4
  • You cannot assign a value to a constant in viewDidLoad – Zell B. May 20 '15 at 19:17
  • Aside from the viewDidLoad part, this is correct. – Brian Nickel May 20 '15 at 19:27
  • OK, thanks, guys. I'll delete that part! (I was obviously thinking about variables for that). – Tim May 20 '15 at 19:41
  • Then if you have more than one designated initializer, you cannot avoid duplicated code. – Franklin Yu May 17 '16 at 5:58
4

You can populate an instance constant property a (at definition time) using the value of another constant property b if b is defined static.

class Thingy {
    static let paddingConstant = 13.0
    let paddingDict = ["padding": paddingConstant]
}

This is the direct answer to the error message you got:

Thingy.Type does not have a member named 'paddingConstant'

Infact by making paddingConstant static, it becomes a Type property: part of Thingy.Type.

Hope this helps.

0

Yes thats possible. You need to make paddingDict read only computed property

class Thingy {

    let paddingConstant = 13.0

    var paddingDict : [String : Double] {

        get {return ["padding": paddingConstant] }
    }
}
6
  • 3
    however this will create a dictionary on every use of paddingDict – giorashc May 20 '15 at 19:15
  • No it wont create a dictionary on every use, but will compute its value on every use and since your paddingDice use another property to compute its value it should be a computed property . You can learn more about computed properties here developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/… – Zell B. May 20 '15 at 19:19
  • 1
    @zellb Can you show where that's explicitly stated? If the property is computed every time, one step of that computation is creating a dictionary. – Brian Nickel May 20 '15 at 19:24
  • Creating new instance mean allocating some memory. Computed properties allocate memory once only and use that memory only for further calculations and thats make a difference – Zell B. May 20 '15 at 19:32
  • @zellb then it was also possible to declare it with 'let' which is more reasonable to indicate a one time memory allocation. But computed properties by their nature change and how exactly can it know if it needs further calculation? – giorashc May 20 '15 at 19:45

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