18

How can I cancel the keydown of a specific key on the keyboard, for example(space, enter and arrows) in an HTML page.

17

If you're only interested in the example keys you mentioned, the keydown event will do, except for older, pre-Blink versions of Opera (up to and including version 12, at least) where you'll need to cancel the keypress event. It's much easier to reliably identify non-printable keys in the keydown event than the keypress event, so the following uses a variable to set in the keydown handler to tell the keypress handler whether or not to suppress the default behaviour.

var cancelKeypress = false;

document.onkeydown = function(evt) {
    evt = evt || window.event;
    cancelKeypress = /^(13|32|37|38|39|40)$/.test("" + evt.keyCode);
    if (cancelKeypress) {
        return false;
    }
};

/* For Opera */
document.onkeypress = function(evt) {
    if (cancelKeypress) {
        return false;
    }
};
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    +1, I deleted my answer in favour of this one, I wasn't aware of the Opera issues :-) – Andy E Jun 14 '10 at 10:29
  • Does Opera quirk still stand these days and times? You still need to cancel in keypress? – Robert Koritnik Jul 11 '16 at 9:39
  • 1
    @RobertKoritnik: I just tried it and it doesn't apply to the latest version of Opera. I would guess it doesn't apply to any Blink-based version of Opera. – Tim Down Jul 11 '16 at 10:16
  • Thanks. I just wanted to be sure as I'm writing come code that deals wit keydown cancellation and din't want to install Opera just to check this. – Robert Koritnik Jul 11 '16 at 10:28
5

Catch the keydown event and return false. It should be in the lines of:

<script>
document.onkeydown = function(e){
  var n = (window.Event) ? e.which : e.keyCode;
  if(n==38 || n==40) return false;
}
</script>

(seen here)

The keycodes are defined here

edit: update my answer to work in IE

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    window.captureEvents is obsolete and has been removed from newer versions of Firefox, and never supported by some other browsers. See developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.captureEvents. – Andy E Jun 14 '10 at 10:00
  • @andy, @tim: true, I copied and pasted blindly. I corrected my answer. Of course now @tim's answer was the fastest and more accurate – marcgg Jun 14 '10 at 13:20
1

This is certainly very old thread. In order to do the magic with IE10 and FireFox 29.0.1 you definitely must do this inside of keypress (not keydown) event listener function:

if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
| improve this answer | |
1

I only develop for IE because my works requires it, so there is my code for numeric field, not a beauty but works just fine

    $(document).ready(function () {

    $("input[class='numeric-field']").keydown(function (e) {

        if (e.shiftKey == 1) {
            return false
        }

        var code = e.which;
        var key;

        key = String.fromCharCode(code);

        //Keyboard numbers   
        if (code >= 48 && code <= 57) {
            return key;
        } //Keypad numbers
        else if (code >= 96 && code <= 105) {
            return key
        } //Negative sign
        else if (code == 189 || code == 109) {
            var inputID = this.id;
            var position = document.getElementById(inputID).selectionStart
            if (position == 0) {
                return key
            }
            else {
                e.preventDefault()
            }
        }// Decimal point
        else if (code == 110 || code == 190) {
            var inputID = this.id;
            var position = document.getElementById(inputID).selectionStart

            if (position == 0) {
                e.preventDefault()
            }
            else {
                return key;
            }
        }// 37 (Left Arrow), 39 (Right Arrow), 8 (Backspace) , 46 (Delete), 36 (Home), 35 (End)
        else if (code == 37 || code == 39 || code == 8 || code == 46 || code == 35 || code == 36) {
            return key
        }
        else {
            e.preventDefault()
        }
    });

});
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  • Upps, this wast not the numeric field blog, sorry – Alexis J. Normandia Jul 12 '14 at 20:30
0

jQuery has a nice KeyPress function which allows you to detect a key press, then it should be just a case of detecting the keyvalue and performing an if for the ones you want to ignore.

edit: for example:

$('#target').keypress(function(event) {
  if (event.keyCode == '13') {
     return false; // or event.preventDefault();
  }
});
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  • he's apaprently not using jquery based on the tags he set – marcgg Jun 14 '10 at 9:49
  • i don't have a problem with using jquery beside that i'm using ASP.NET – Jack Jun 14 '10 at 9:51
  • 1
    @Luke: Does jQuery normalize the keypress event? It behaves differently across browsers, so I would be interested to know if jQuery solves those differences. – Andy E Jun 14 '10 at 9:54
  • @Andy E's Head: I am a great believer in all things jQuery, but I am no expert. From what I have read, I'm pretty sure jQuery is cross browser, and according to their site supports IE6+ FF2+ Chrome and Safari. If there are different behaviours for the keypress event, I am sure they have covered it. – Luke Duddridge Jun 14 '10 at 10:23
0

Just return false. Beware that on Opera this doesn't work. You might want to use onkeyup instead and check the last entered character and deal with it. Or better of use JQuery KeyPress

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