9

I have here a Handler class, which is supposed to handle Events of a certain type:

public interface Handler<E extends Event>
{
    public void handle(E event);

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public default Class<E> getEventType()
    {
        for(Method method: this.getClass().getDeclaredMethods())
        {
            if(method.getName().equals("handle")) return (Class<E>)method.getParameterTypes()[0];
        }
        throw new NullPointerException("Couldn't find the 'handle' method in this handler.");
    }
}

As you can see, it will try, by default, to get the type of Event by returning the first parameter type of the handle() method whenever you execute getEventType() (as opposed to a Handler that returns it explicitly). This works correctly with the following JUnit test:

public static class EmptyEvent extends Event
{
    public void test() { }
}

public static Handler<EmptyEvent> genericHandler = new Handler<EmptyEvent>()
{
    @Override
    public void handle(EmptyEvent event)
    {

    }
};

@Test
public void testEventGenerics()
{
    //prints the name of EmptyEvent
    System.out.println(genericHandler.getEventType());
}

Intellij IDEA tells me that I can simplify genericHandler to a lambda expression, so I do that:

public static class EmptyEvent extends Event
{
    public void test() { }
}

public static Handler<EmptyEvent> genericHandler = event -> { };

@Test
public void testEventGenerics()
{
    //prints the name of the base Event class
    System.out.println(genericHandler.getEventType());
}

however, the test prints out the name of Event, not EmptyEvent.

So my question is, Is there a way to explicitly define the generic parameter type of a lambda expression?

I tried doing something like this, but it doesn't do anything (also it's an error)

public static Handler<EmptyEvent> genericHandler = (EmptyEvent)event -> { };
0

3 Answers 3

5

Yes you can define the type of a lambda expression parameter:

public static Handler<EmptyEvent> genericHandler = (EmptyEvent event) -> { };

In general it is not necessary because it is implied by context. However it often makes the code easier to read.

See https://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/jls-15.html#jls-15.27 for more details

6
  • Hmm. It compiles and this answers the question, but for some reason genericHandler.getEventType() still returns the name of Event. Would you have any idea why?
    – octopod
    Commented May 21, 2015 at 1:55
  • @Octopod possibly because you're relying on the order that different methods get returned by getDeclaredMethods, which is a no-no. Commented May 21, 2015 at 1:56
  • @immibis except that I'm pretty sure that there is only one handle() method (the one I defined), isn't there? Are you saying there's also a handle(Event) too?
    – octopod
    Commented May 21, 2015 at 1:59
  • @Octopod Yes; it's a bridge method. I don't know whether it will be returned from getDeclaredMethods, but apparently it is. Commented May 21, 2015 at 2:04
  • @immibis, I changed getEventType() to print out every method named handle. handle(Event) is the only method it found using getDeclaredMethods(). getMethods() returns the same thing.
    – octopod
    Commented May 21, 2015 at 2:13
1

You are making assumptions about the class of the object that the lambda evaluates to, and I don't think those assumptions are valid. It is sufficient that the lambda overrides the method handle() from Handler, and at runtime, a handle() method that takes Event is sufficient to override the handle() from Handler, which after erasure takes Event. Nowhere is it guaranteed that the lambda must have a handle() method that can be introspected to say that it takes EmptyEvent.

0

The following variables might all point to the same object!

Handler<EventA> handlerA = event -> { };
Handler<EventB> handlerB = event -> { };

Consumer<String> consumer1 = string -> {}
Consumer<Integer> consumer2 = integer-> {}

You cannot really reason about the exact runtime type of a lambda expression; the only guarantee is that the lambda body works at runtime.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se8/html/jls-15.html#jls-15.27.4

The [runtime] method's body has the effect of evaluating the lambda body

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