3

scom.h

extern byte i;

scom.c

byte i;
void interrupt_Rx(void)
{
    byte data;
    data = SCI0DRL; // data taken from SCI0
    i = SCI0DRL;
    // code ( in this code, variable i is not used)
}

app.c

#include "Scom.h"

extern byte i;
byte j; // global variable

In one of the function defined in app.c, I am assigning i to j;

void fun(void)
{
    //some code
    j=i;
    //operations on j;
    j = j & 0x0F;
    k = j +0x30;
    lcd_puta(k);// displaying k on LCD
}

Expected value for j is j = 0x07 and for k = 0x37

after using breakpoint at j=i; value of j itself is random value. Why so? did I make any mistake??

  • 3
    but i am not able to operate on i/j. kindly elaborate – Sourav Ghosh May 21 '15 at 7:43
  • 3
    What result are you getting? And what result did you expect? And how do you check the values? – Some programmer dude May 21 '15 at 7:44
  • @SouravGhosh : operations like j=j&0x0F; k=j+0x30 and then displaying k on LCD – Rasika May 21 '15 at 7:51
  • 1
    Please add this information to the question and not as a comment. Otherwise most people will not read it. You can click on the edit link to edit your question. – Mailerdaimon May 21 '15 at 7:52
  • @JoachimPileborg some random values .. fatleast i am expecting j as 0x77 after execution of j=i; statement – Rasika May 21 '15 at 7:53
0
  1. Keeping scom.h as is, your app.c should have #include "scom.h"

  2. Confirm that variable i of the type byte is declared as volatile byte i; and not being updated in any other piece of code after the ISR is executed and before it is assigned to j in func().

  3. In your function

    void fun(void)
    {
       //some code
       j=i;
       //operations on j;
       j = j & 0x0F;
       k = j + 0x30;
       lcd_puta(k);// displaying k on LCD
    }
    

    i is not declared locally in //some code, else i will be taken locally due to block scope. You said that,

    after using breakpoint at j=i; value of j itself is random value.

Reading this doesn't make clear if you have a breakpoint after the instruction i.e. at the next instruction or to the line where it says i=j; If latter the case then, 'j' is yet to be assigned with the value of 'i'. Instead have i in watch window while debugging.

This doesn't look like happening in your case but, I can see that j is a global variable, is it externed elsewhere and modified by some other ISR than the one shown in the post?
Being blind to that part of code (if it is there) I can predict that there are chances that one such ISR(if it is there) that change value of j after is it assigned with i and before being printed. For example:

    ISR(TIMER_0)
    {
       //Clear and disable interrupt
       j += 1; //can be anything that modifies j.
       //Enable interrupt
    }

    void fun(void)
    {
       //some code
       j=i;
       //operations on j;    
       j = j & 0x0F;         // Interrupt received here Or
       k = j + 0x30;         // Interrupt received here
       //Here value of `k` is different than what is expected, obviously
       lcd_puta(k);// displaying k on LCD
    }

I am assuming that k is of the compatible data type, preferably of the type byte.

Though its not a really strict rule, should you declare a variable in an ISR? No, you shouldn't. Assuming the subroutines use the same register bank of course, Interrupts may have local variables just like normal functions. But, higher levels of optimization in the compiler will move variables automatically into the registers, thus saving them when an interrupt triggers. Please do not declare byte data; in void interrupt_Rx(void).

| improve this answer | |
  • @Olaf: While I agree about returning void, I do have a thought on declaring variables in an ISR. For optimization purpose, the compiler move the variables into the registers. – WedaPashi May 22 '15 at 4:02
  • 1) you don't return void; this is plain nothing; actually "void" is no type, but - well - exactly what it says. You really should read the standard about this. And what would be the point about locals and the compiler? Share your thougths please; what would be the problem with the compiler using registers for locals (no idea what you mean by "move into ..."). On most RISC CPUs (ARM e.g.) you have to use registers anyway, as they do not support memory operands. – too honest for this site May 22 '15 at 5:01

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.