20

I want to block requests from bots that attempt to brute force login to my website.

I'm using Session to store login attempts, and I show a Captcha after three unsuccessful logins. However, the problem is that Session is removed once the user closes the browser.

What kind of solution should I consider to prevent bots and brute force login attempts? What property of the user system or browser should I use to manage his/her next login?

Note: I don't use an ASP.NET Membership provider. I am using my own authentication and authorization classes.

4
  • Are you using the ASP.NET Memebership provider? You can configure the MaxInvalidPasswordAttempts property to do this
    – DGibbs
    May 21, 2015 at 9:22
  • 1
    The first what comes to mind is IP address, but addresses can be shared and you will block innocent users too. But you can remember more data like browser and so on and block only if all match. Just remember that more complicated BOTs can change everything and bypas this.
    – DangeMask
    May 21, 2015 at 9:22
  • What about showing the capture when your have having an unusually large number of logins. say if you get 50 failed logging attempts show the captcha for the next 1 hour for all users. This would be a small impact on the legitimate users but will allow you to maintain service during these attacks.
    – P6345uk
    Jun 5, 2015 at 10:35
  • you could also pass back a guid in a hidden field and only allow them to use the Guid to login a maximum of 4-5 times. meaning that the form could only be used to submit a maximum number of times (similar to MVC AntiForgeryToken)
    – P6345uk
    Jun 5, 2015 at 10:41

7 Answers 7

41
+250

You can't use session, as it requires the client to store a cookie for you, and an attacker is not going to help you out. You will need some global state.

You needn't bother tracking IP addresses, as a bad guy will just use an Anonymyzing Proxy.

Don't use account lock-out unless you have to (PCI requirement), as this just lets the attacker DoS your users.

You also want to avoid DoS-ing yourself by making your server do too much work.

This works:

Upon unsuccessful authentication, store username in global state, along with count. Synchronized count++ if more unsuccessful authentications with that username. I use redis for this.

If count >= threshold, then demand solved CAPTCHA value before proceeding. Show CAPTCHA on login screen.

Upon successful authentication, clear stored username in global state. Give user "trusted user agent" HMAC'd cookie, so they don't have to CAPTCHA in the future for that username on that UA.

You can do the same for passwords, but probably with a higher threshold.

If you don't like CAPTCHA then demand Proof of Work, for example by making the client calculate and submit the prime factors of a very large number.

While you're at it, make sure you are using bcrypt to hash your passwords, and that the cost factor is high enough that it takes >= 250ms to hash a password. This slows down your server but also slows down an attacker. Avoid hashing unless they pass the CAPTCHA (if required).

Encourage users to use long, complicated, memorable? passwords, so that they're harder to brute-force.

1
5

The easiest would be to front your solution with a CDN provider such as cloudflare (https://www.cloudflare.com/features-security) that will detect bots for you. Lots of the CDNs offer this, and cloudflare have a free tariff.

Alternatively if you are attempting to do this yourself, then you can count the number of attempts per username in your database and present a captcha based on this count.

1
  • 1
    Prefer to store it in a ram store like Redis. Much more efficient and you can put a TTL on it.
    – gmourier
    Jun 5, 2015 at 10:02
4

If you are using your own authentication and authorization classes, you need to count the number of failed attempt to login for each user and it's date and time.

If the number of attempts is reached the limit that you will break the next login process with error message like "Your account was blocked for a 15 minutes, please try again later."

For example. Table of logins is named [Logins].

You need to add new colums:
1. [LastLoginAttemptAt] DATETIME NULL
2. [LoginFailedAttemptsCount] INT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0

So, your class Login will have these new fields:

public class Login {
    public DateTime? LastLoginAttemptAt {get;set;}
    public int LoginFailedAttemptsCount {get;set;}
}

Also you need to store somewere configuration variable - the value of max number of failed attempts to login and block period.

const int MaxNumberOfFailedAttemptsToLogin = 10;
const int BlockMinutesAfterLimitFailedAttemptsToLogin = 15; // 15 min

On a signIn method you will do the following (primitive example of code, not a prod-version):

public void SignIn(string username, string password)
{    
    var login = _userService.TryGetLogin(username);
    if (login == null){
        // Login by username not found.
        // Return error message "Invalid username or password"
        return;
    }

    if (login.LoginFailedAttemptsCount > MaxNumberOfFailedAttemptsToLogin
    && login.LastLoginAttemptAt.HasValue
    && DateTime.Now < login.LastLoginAttemptAt.Value.AddMinutes(BlockMinutesAfterLimitFailedAttemptsToLogin))
    {
        // Login is blocked, need to break the process.
        // Return error message "Your account was blocked 
        // for a 15 minutes, please try again later."
        return;
    } else {
        login.LoginFailedAttemptsCount = 0;
        login.LastLoginAttemptAt = DateTime.Now;
    }

    var success = login.ValidatePassword(password);
    if (!success)
    {
        // Invalid password, need to update the number of attempts.
        login.LastLoginAttemptAt = DateTime.Now; //or UTC
        login.LoginFailedAttemptsCount++;
        // Update(login);
        // Return error message "Invalid username or password"
        return;
    } else {
        login.LoginFailedAttemptsCount = 0;
        login.LastLoginAttemptAt = DateTime.Now;
        // Update(login);
        // Success!
    }
}
0
4

Identify invalid logins based on IpAddress (anonymous proxy). Each invalid login IP and login count & time will be stored in Application State.

Create Class InvalidLogin:

public class InvalidLogin
{
    public string IP { get; set; }
    public DateTime Attempttime { get; set; }
    public int AttemptCount { get; set; }
}

Login Event:

protected void Login_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    bool Testsuccessfullogin = false;
    if (Testsuccessfullogin)
    {
        // Your code after successful login
    }
    else
    {
        // Invalid Login --- Capture each login event based on IP
        string strIp;
        strIp = Request.ServerVariables["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR"]; // When user is behind proxy server
        if (strIp == null)
        {
            strIp = Request.ServerVariables["REMOTE_ADDR"]; // Without proxy
        }

        List<InvalidLogin> user = null;
        if (HttpContext.Current.Application["Users"] == null) // Adding List to Application State
        {
            user = new List<InvalidLogin>();
        }
        else
        {
            user = (List<InvalidLogin>)HttpContext.Current.Application["Users"];
        }
        var remove = user.RemoveAll(x => x.Attempttime < DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(-15)); // Remove IP Before 15 minutes (Give 15 Min Time Next Login)
        var checkLogged = user.Find(x => x.IP == strIp);
        if (checkLogged == null)
        {
            user.Add(new InvalidLogin
            {
                IP = strIp,
                Attempttime = DateTime.Now,
                AttemptCount = 1
            });
            Application.Lock();
            HttpContext.Current.Application["Users"] = user;
            Application.UnLock();
        }
        else
        {
            if (checkLogged.AttemptCount < 4)
            {
                checkLogged.Attempttime = DateTime.Now;
                checkLogged.AttemptCount++;
                Application.Lock();
                HttpContext.Current.Application["Users"] = user;
                Application.UnLock();
            }
        }

        if (checkLogged != null)
        {
            if (checkLogged.AttemptCount > 3)
            {
                captcha.Visible = true;  //Showing captcha
            }
        }
    }
}
0
2

I'd like to add one thing that others haven't mentioned. Whenever possible, you don't want to alert bots to the fact that they've been detected. If you block them with some message, then they will use this information to adjust their tactics. If you're "noticing" them by IP address, for example, just don't allow the password that they're entering to ever succeed. They will be fooled into thinking that you have some complicated passwords, etc., and go elsewhere, without ever knowing for sure that you detected them.

I would also suggest storing login attempts in a database with their IP. You can then easily go back and review attempts that have been made against your site. You could query the web logs, but that's more painful. I also log successful logins. This way I can take note when bots do get in, so I can go back and apply further research.

2
  • There's merit to this. What bothers me about this approach is the extra work on DOS vulnerability. Ideally, I would block them once identified (after say 5-15 attempts). To not do so, allows them to hit your website 10,000-10,000,000 more times. That could overwhelm your site (nature of DOS attack). So while there's merit in deluding attackers, it is outweighed by the burden of carrying their ongoing requests. Jun 2, 2015 at 22:34
  • depending on how you implement the blocking, it's not necessarily going to help with a DOS attack anyways. most of the methods that people have been describing still hit code and read sessions, etc, so the DOS would still happen with those kinds of blocks. the real way to prevent a DOS attack is at edge routers and I see as something that should be thought of and handled completely separately from preventing someone from automating your site, which doesn't even necessarily have to be done at volume. Jun 3, 2015 at 18:01
0

You can suspend the account after few failed attempts and have user answer security questions to re-enable it. Also do not allow the reuse of a last few passwords and you should be safe.

Now that being said if you want to do it via coding then save the third login attempt time [MaxAttemptTime] (DateTime.Now) and time to release the account [ReleaseTime] (say after 20 minutes DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(20)).

Now every time there is an attempt from the same user to login it should be declined based on the [ReleaseTime]. Reset these counters on the successful login for a genuine user.

0

If i were doing this i would use a column in a database to store the login attempt number and a date time stamp for the first attempt. Then have some logic around the login

 if(loginAttempt>5 && DateTime.Now<loginDate.AddMinute(5))
{
    //Locked out
}

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