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I've read a lot of related articles on the matter and also the very good article about HTTP caching here: https://developers.google.com/web/fundamentals/performance/optimizing-content-efficiency/http-caching?hl=en#invalidating-and-updating-cached-responses but it is still not clear to me:

Why isn't sending an ETag header enough to invalidate the browser cache for a particular resource? Why does everyone recommend actually changing the URL/filename of the resource to force the browser to re-download the file? If the browser has already cached the file with a particular ETag and the ETag is modified on the server, wouldn't that suffice?

5

I find the following pages helpful:

This line from MDN's ETag page shares the key point (emphasis added):

If a user visits a given URL again (that has an ETag set), and it is stale, that is too old to be considered usable, the client will send the value of its ETag along in an If-None-Match header field...

The ETag will be used by the client to revalidate resources once they become "stale". But what constitutes "stale"?

This is where the Cache-Control header comes in handy. The Cache-Control header can be sent with a response to let the client know how long the client may cache an item until it should be considered stale. For example, Cache-Control: no-cache would indicate that the resource should be considered stale immediately. See the MDN Cache-Control page for more information on available Cache-Control values.

When the browser attempts to process a request for a cached resource that is considered stale, it will first send a revalidation request to the server with the resource's last ETag value included via the If-None-Match request header, as described on MDN's ETag page. It can also use the Last-Modified response header sent as the If-Modified-Since request header as a secondary option.

If the server determines that the client's ETag value (in the If-None-Match request header) is current, then it will respond with a 304 (Not Modified) HTTP status code and an empty body, indicating that the client can use the cached entry. Otherwise, the server will respond with a 200 HTTP status code and the new response body.

Other resources:

To answer your questions directly:

  • Why isn't sending an ETag header enough to invalidate the browser cache for a particular resource? -- Because the ETag header is not validated until the cached entry is considered stale, such as via an expiration date set in the Cache-Control response header.
  • Why does everyone recommend actually changing the URL/filename of the resource to force the browser to re-download the file? -- Changing the URL/filename or adding a query string will force the client to avoid using a cache. This is simple and is a virtually guaranteed way of cache-busting. This does not mean it's necessary, but it tends to be safe in the realm of inconsistent browser behaviors.
  • If the browser has already cached the file with a particular ETag and the ETag is modified on the server, wouldn't that suffice? -- Technically it should suffice as long as the appropriate Cache-Control headers (including the Pragma and Expires headers) are included. See How to control web page caching, across all browsers? for more details.
  • Thank you for the detailed answer. I have marked it as accepted, although from a technical point of view, if all browsers, servers and proxies were consistent in their implementation, I still see no reason why ETag alone would not suffice for all caching purposes. So, unless I'm mistaken, the simple answer to my question is because of inconsistencies in different implementations. – AsGoodAsItGets Nov 29 '17 at 10:23
  • Also, for me the concept of stale is unnecessary. The browser can keep a cached version of a file until it runs out of the allocated cache space and needs to free up some space for newer files, or the ETag for that particular file is changed on the server. I don't see why we need to introduce the concept of stale. – AsGoodAsItGets Nov 29 '17 at 10:28
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    I'm sorry, my answer might not have been clear on what it means for a resource to be "stale". The client will only validate the ETag (or Last-Modified date) of a cached resource against the server if the resource is "stale". So even if the server's resource changes, the client won't actually check for this change until this "stale" requirement is met. It will just keep using the local cache and won't send any request to the server. In this sense the concept of "stale" is very important as it dictates the maximum "out-of-date"-ness of a cached resource. – Mike Hill Nov 29 '17 at 17:46
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    Ah, this makes more sense indeed, saves the browser some unnecessary http requests. Thanks again for the clarification! – AsGoodAsItGets Nov 30 '17 at 8:25

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