4

I've been shown the following Java code as part of a code review and it's quite frankly hideous. However, I'm at a loss as to what the best way to re-write it is.

We have a list that's always in the same order (0-5) and each index corresponds to a different property that is required to be set. Using groovy it would be easy as it would be myObject."setLine${i}" or similar but how can we achieve the same in plain Java?

    SomeObject myObject = new SomeObject();
    List<String> lines = new ArrayList<>(){{
    add("Line 1");
    add("Line 2");
    add("Line 3");
    add("Line 4");
    add("Line 5");
    add("Line 6");
}};

for(int i=0; i< lines.size(); i++){
    if(!StringUtils.isBlank(lines.get(i))){
        String line = lines.get(i);
        // line1
        if(i==0){
            myObject.setLine1(line);
        }
        // line2
        if(i==1){
            myObject.setLine2(line);
        }
        // line3
        if(i==2){
            myObject.setLine3(line);
        }
        // line4
        if(i==3){
            myObject.setLine4(line);
        }
        // line5
        if(i==4){
            myObject.setLine5(line);
        }
        //line6
        if(i==5){
            myObject.setLine6(line);
        }
    }
}

I know that for:each can provide us with an index but it's the "dynamic" method calling that I'm querying. Any suggestion welcome - I'm considering that the MyObject class should maybe have a method to take in a list of address strings so that it doesn't couple quite so tightly by exposing the number of lines to the caller (ie if we add/remove a "setLineX" method we don't want to have to update the caller).

4
  • 1
    See Switch-statements in my mind are just as nasty as the big if statement (well, nearly as nasty). A switch is basically another syntactic representation of an if... No? May 21, 2015 at 11:48
  • You are right @Al but it reads better; but I would go with the method of MadConan May 21, 2015 at 12:01
  • Using switch on the loop variable is almost always a bad idea... especially if the switch contains almost all the relevant code (doing the same things with ifs isn't better). Also creating a anonymus subclass of ArrayList just to fill the list is a "faux pas" (at least in my opinion). It may not be a problem, if you use this many adds, but if you'd add more, the capacity would be modified. Also there is a way to do this without creating a anonymus class: new ArrayList<>(Arrays.asList("Line 1", "Line 2", ..., "Line 6"))
    – fabian
    May 21, 2015 at 12:17
  • Thanks, @fabian. The anonymous inner class was purely for example examples sake - in reality it's derived from a bound form object. May 21, 2015 at 13:08

2 Answers 2

7

The first issue is in myObject. Having set methods for each line is, as you can see, tedious. How about something like this?

class MyObject{
    private Map<Integer,String> lines = new HashMap<>();

    public void setLine(int lineNumber, String line){
        lines.put(lineNumber,line);
    }

    public String getLine(int lineNumber){
        lines.get(lineNumber);
    }

}

Now you can simply do

for(int i=0;i<lineListSize;i++){
    myOjbect.setLine(i,lineList.get(i));
}

EDIT: As Fabian just pointed out, you could do the same with a List.

class MyObject{
    private List<String> lines = new ArrayList<>();

    public void setLine(int lineNumber, String line){
        lines.add(lineNumber,line);
    }

    public String getLine(int lineNumber){
        lines.get(lineNumber);
    }

}

EDIT2: I can never leave well-enough-alone. You can make the transfer even cleaner with

class MyObject{
    ... 
    // Collection, getter and setter omitted
    ...
    public void addAllLines(List<String> lines){
       // implementation varies depending on collection,
       // but List would simply be "this.lines.addAll(lines);" 
    }

    public List<String> getAllLines(){
       // Again, depends on the type of Collection used by 
       // this instance.
       // Probably want to return a copy if thread safety is an issue.
    }
}
4
  • Mmmm nice.I quite like that. May 21, 2015 at 11:50
  • And you don't even need a map for this... A array does the trick as well.
    – fabian
    May 21, 2015 at 11:51
  • Thanks dudes think that's solved it! Will accept when time limit allows May 21, 2015 at 11:53
  • Why not simply storing a reference of lines in MyObject? As from the example lines contains always the lines from 0..n without gaps.
    – SubOptimal
    May 21, 2015 at 12:10
1

If you wrap the method calls in consumers (define your own if you're not using Java 8) and pass in a tuple of myObject and the String. Since the consumers are stateless, you can keep them in a static list.

private static List<Consumer<Tuple<SomeObject, String>> consumers = Arrays.asList(
    new Consumer<>() {
        public void consume(Tuple<SomeObject, String> tuple) {
            tuple._1.setLine1(tuple._2);
        }
    },
    new Consumer<>() {
        public void consume(Tuple<SomeObject, String> tuple) {
            tuple._1.setLine2(tuple._2);
        }
    },
    ... and so on
);

Your loop then becomes

final int numConsumers = consumers.size();
for(int i=0; i < numConsumers && i < lines.size(); i++){
    String line = lines.get(i);
    if(!StringUtils.isBlank(line)){
        consumers.get(i).consume(new Tuple<>(myObject, line));
    }
}

For reference, Tuple is just a class to wrap multiple values

public class Tuple<A, B> {
    public final A _1;
    public final B _2;

    public Tuple(A a, B a) {
        this._1 = a;
        this._2 = b;
    }
}

If you have Java 8, the consumer definitions shrink dramatically:

private static final List<BiConsumer<MyObject, String>> CONSUMERS = Arrays.asList(
        (o, s) -> o.setLine1(s),
        (o, s) -> o.setLine2(s),
        (o, s) -> o.setLine3(s)

);

And the use of the consumer no longer requires a Tuple:

consumers.get(i).consume(myObject, line);

The whole thing now looks like this:

public class ExampleClass {

    private static final List<BiConsumer<MyObject, String>> CONSUMERS = Arrays.asList(
        (o, s) -> o.setLine1(s),
        (o, s) -> o.setLine2(s),
        (o, s) -> o.setLine3(s)
        // and so on
    );

    public void exampleMethod() {
        SomeObject myObject = new SomeObject();
        List<String> lines = Arrays.asList("Line 1", "Line 2", "Line 3", "Line 4", "Line 5", "Line 6");

        for(int i = 0, numConsumers = consumers.size(), numLines = lines.size(); i < numConsumers && i < numLines; i++){
            String line = lines.get(i);
            if(!StringUtils.isBlank(line)){
                consumers.get(i).consume(myObject, line);
            }
        }
    }
}
3
  • Very elegant, Steve -thanks. However for simplicities sake (and avoiding a big re-write) I think I'll go with the suggestion from @MadConan May 21, 2015 at 11:59
  • Thought about using BiConsumers instead of creating a Tuple class? Also lambda expressions would make the code much shorter without reducing readability.
    – fabian
    May 21, 2015 at 12:02
  • I used a pre-lambda code example to be more inclusive, but you're right - I'll update with a Java 8 example for completeness. May 21, 2015 at 12:03

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