249

How wrong is it to place the script tag after the closing tag of the body (</body>)?

<html>
  ....
  <body>
     ....
  </body>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="theJs.js"></script>
</html>
2
  • 1
    Is there support for it in modern browsers.
    – Xdrone
    Aug 30, 2014 at 21:22
  • It's not wrong. It will cause an alarm on validators, but it will run on most browsers. It is not wrong, but it is not valid. Nov 7, 2022 at 3:14

10 Answers 10

213

It won't validate outside of the <body> or <head> tags. It also won't make much difference — unless you're doing DOM manipulations that could break IE before the body element is fully loaded — to putting it just before the closing </body>.

<html>
  ....
  <body>
     ....
     <script type="text/javascript" src="theJs.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>
14
  • 15
    @epalla: if you put the script right at the end of the body tag there's no other content left to load by the time it gets there, so there should be little difference between placing it outside or just inside. You then have the added benefit of your page still validating, which was the point I was trying to make in my answer.
    – Andy E
    Jun 14, 2010 at 16:19
  • 1
    Yep, I was agreeing with you since your answer is good. I just wanted to add that there is a reason for putting JS at the bottom of the page instead of in the head as we've done for a long time. Jun 14, 2010 at 16:34
  • 3
    @PHPst: well, invalid code may be subject to side effects in certain browsers. Either way, I don't see how its indentation being one tab-width less than the code above it makes it look any cleaner.
    – Andy E
    May 1, 2013 at 12:48
  • 1
    @PHPst: I would expect browsers to cope with it if you really want to write your code that way. I'd still recommend writing your code to validate, however.
    – Andy E
    May 2, 2013 at 10:18
  • 1
    @technosaurus: there's always <script src="..." defer>, which works in all major browsers (albeit with a potentially breaking bug in IE9 and lower).
    – Andy E
    Dec 11, 2014 at 11:48
113

Only comments and the end tag for the html element are allowed after the end tag for the body.

You can confirm this with the specification or a validator.

Browsers may perform error recovery, and the HTML specification even describes how to recover in that situation, but you should never depend on that.


It is also worth noting that the usual reason for putting the script element at the end is to ensure that elements the script may try to access via the DOM exist before the script runs.

With the arrival of the defer attribute we can place the script in the head and still get that benefit while also having the JS be downloaded by the browser in parallel with the HTML for better performance.

2
  • 16
    This is a better answer. There are too many new browsers out there with mobile coming into play to risk doing it wrong when all you have to is cut and paste a single closing tag. Mar 29, 2012 at 20:29
  • 1
    Note that defer only applies to external script files (i.e. you must also specify src attribute). You cannot "defer" a <script> element that contains script.
    – Ian Boyd
    Aug 3, 2022 at 18:09
35

As Andy said, the document will be not valid, but nevertheless the script will still be interpreted. See the snippet from WebKit for example:

void HTMLParser::processCloseTag(Token* t)
{
    // Support for really broken HTML.
    // we never close the body tag, since some stupid web pages close it before
    // the actual end of the doc.
    // let's rely on the end() call to close things.
    if (t->tagName == htmlTag || t->tagName == bodyTag
                              || t->tagName == commentAtom)
        return;
    ...
1
  • 13
    "Support for really broken html." -- I think it says it all. Jul 21, 2016 at 13:56
9

Internet Explorer doesn't allow this any more (since version 10, I believe) and will ignore such scripts.

Firefox and Chrome still tolerate them, but there are chances that some day they will drop this as non-standard.

1
  • 1
    And yet Google does this in their example of how to do G+ sign-in, with "last updated April 10, 2014". I got it from the version for Java on the server (developers.google.com/+/quickstart/java) but presumably it is the same HTML+js for all.
    – Tom
    Apr 15, 2014 at 17:10
3

Procedurally inserting an "element script" after an "element body" is a "parse error" by the recommended process by W3C. In "Tree Construction" create an error and run "tokenize again" to process that content. So it's like an additional step. Only then can it run the "Script Execution" - see the scheme process.

Anything else is a "parse error". Switch the "insertion mode" to "in body" and reprocess the token.

Technically, by the browser, it's an internal process how they mark and optimize it.

1

Yes. But if you do add the code outside it most likely will not be the end of the world since most browsers will fix it, but it is still a bad practice to get into.

0

Technically you shouldn't be able to place the script tag after the body tag since rendering of the page content ends with the body (or is it the head?.)

But browsers are somewhat fault tolerant (although I wouldn't depend on this as a universal truth because you just might never know) and they'd:

  1. move the script tag back into the body tag if it appears outside the body or html tag.
  2. move the script tag into the head tag if it appears before the document declaration.
  3. leave it as is if it appears (in source order) anywhere else it appears in the document.

To be safe, you can:

  1. use the defer or async attribute with the script tag in the head, or
  2. use the script tag(s) right before the closing body tag

This norm is an accepted practice/convention and is guaranteed to remove any doubts.

Also while you are play safe and do the most [reasonable] thing, keep in mind that what you need to [then] worry about is the performance because the loading/downloading, parsing and interpretation of the internal/external sourced file(s) is/are dependent on where the script(s) tag occurs, even if you were using defer or async.

<!-- Moved (prepend) into the head -->
<script>console.log(1);
</script>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">

<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge">
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
    <!-- Remains where it is -->
    <script>
        console.log(2);
    </script>
    <title>Document</title>
</head>

<body>
    <h1>Content goes here</h1>
    <!-- Remains where it is -->
    <script>
        console.log(3);
    </script>
    <h1>Content goes here</h1>

    <!-- Remains where it is -->
    <script>
        console.log(4);
    </script>
</body>

</html>
<!-- Moved (append) into the body -->
<script>
    console.log(5);
</script>
0

Google actually recommends this in regards to 'CSS Optimization'. They recommend in-lining critical above-fold styles and deferring the rest (CSS file).

Example:

<html>
  <head>
    <style>
      .blue{color:blue;}
    </style>
    </head>
  <body>
    <div class="blue">
      Hello, world!
    </div>
  </body>
</html>
<noscript><link rel="stylesheet" href="small.css"></noscript>

See: Optimize CSS Delivery

5
  • 10
    You're not supposed to put stuff outside of the body element. That Google article doesn't advise anyone to do any such thing. Aug 16, 2014 at 22:35
  • 2
    Im afraid that google page says actually just exact that.
    – 10us
    Sep 28, 2015 at 14:38
  • 8
    It seems like at one time, that page did recommend such a thing, but not anymore. (Now there is some dynamic loading with javascript.) The german version is not up to date and still contains the old code example.
    – bodo
    Feb 4, 2016 at 17:05
  • 1
    "element noscript" have to be by RFC inside "element html" and "element body" too
    – Bruno
    Feb 3, 2019 at 16:04
  • If using a CSP for security, you probably don't want CSS in your HTML file
    – Charles L.
    Jan 14, 2022 at 1:57
0

You can place it like the below, or also inside the head tag is fine, but regular practice is something like just before the end of the </body> naming a comment for easy use later, and opening a <script>putting any JS inside</script></body></html>.

    <script>
      window.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', event => {

        // Activate Bootstrap scrollspy on the main nav element
        const sideNav = document.body.querySelector('#sideNav');
        if (sideNav) {
          new bootstrap.ScrollSpy(document.body, {
            target: '#sideNav',
            offset: 74,
          });
        };

        // Collapse responsive navbar when toggler is visible
        const navbarToggler = document.body.querySelector('.navbar-toggler');
        const responsiveNavItems = [].slice.call(
          document.querySelectorAll('#navbarResponsive .nav-link')
        );
        responsiveNavItems.map(function (responsiveNavItem) {
          responsiveNavItem.addEventListener('click', () => {
            if (window.getComputedStyle(navbarToggler).display !== 'none') {
              navbarToggler.click();
            }
          });
        });
      });
    </script>

    <!-- Bootstrap core JS-->

    <script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/npm/bootstrap@5.0.2/dist/js/bootstrap.bundle.min.js"></script>

</body>

</html>
0

Modern browsers will take script tags in the body like so:

<body>
    <!-- main body content -->
    <script src="scripts/main.js"></script>
</body>

Basically, it means that the script will be loaded once the page has finished, which may be useful in certain cases (namely DOM manipulation). However, I highly recommend you take the same script and put it in the head tag with "defer", as it will give a similar effect.

<head>
    <script src="scripts/main.js" defer></script>
</head>
4
  • 1
    What would be useful is if script tags had a event attribute that could be defined to determine when to parse the script. So you have event="load" event="DOMContentLoaded" for running the script after the DOM is created or event="beforeunload" on the window beforeunload event. Example, <script src="scripts/main.js" event="DOMContentLoaded"></script>. Jan 24, 2020 at 11:06
  • Putting it in the head with defer doesn't have the same effect; with defer, in the head: The script is fetched asynchronously, and it’s executed only after the HTML parsing is done. Whereas if you put the script at the end of the body: The HTML parsing is done without any pauses, and when it finishes, the script is fetched, and executed.
    – nCardot
    Mar 21, 2021 at 15:30
  • How does that answer the question? The quesion is "Is it wrong to place the <script> tag after the </body> tag?"? Nov 22, 2021 at 4:05
  • @PeterMortensen it's not wrong to do anything especially in something as lax as html 😂 I was referring to potentially unexpected behavior where the document hasn't actually finished loading yet depending on where you put the script tag in the body.
    – Ad Charity
    Jan 29, 2022 at 8:54

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.