6

I had the hypothesis that if I wrote mutually recursive coroutines with asyncio, they would not hit the maximum recursion depth exception, since the event loop was calling them (and act like a trampoline). This, however, is not the case when I write them like this:

import asyncio

@asyncio.coroutine
def a(n):
    print("A: {}".format(n))
    if n > 1000: return n
    else: yield from b(n+1)

@asyncio.coroutine
def b(n):
    print("B: {}".format(n))
    yield from a(n+1)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(a(0))

When this runs, I get RuntimeError: maximum recursion depth exceeded while calling a Python object.

Is there a way to keep the stack from growing in recursive coroutines with asyncio?

  • each time you 'yield from' you are hooking into the next call. Have you tried using a queue instead? That way you can hand off the information and dequeue into the next coroutine without linking them into each other. – songololo May 21 '15 at 19:25
8

To keep the stack from growing, you have to allow each coroutine to actually exit after it schedules the next recursive call, which means you have to avoid using yield from. Instead, you use asyncio.async (or asyncio.ensure_future if using Python 3.4.4+) to schedule the next coroutine with the event loop, and use Future.add_done_callback to schedule a callback to run once the recursive call returns. Each coroutine then returns an asyncio.Future object, which has its result set inside the callback that's run when the recursive call it scheduled completes.

It's probably easiest to understand if you actually see the code:

import asyncio

@asyncio.coroutine
def a(n):
    fut = asyncio.Future()  # We're going to return this right away to our caller
    def set_result(out):  # This gets called when the next recursive call completes
        fut.set_result(out.result()) # Pull the result from the inner call and return it up the stack.
    print("A: {}".format(n))
    if n > 1000: 
        return n
    else: 
        in_fut = asyncio.async(b(n+1))  # This returns an asyncio.Task
        in_fut.add_done_callback(set_result) # schedule set_result when the Task is done.
    return fut

@asyncio.coroutine
def b(n):
    fut = asyncio.Future()
    def set_result(out):
        fut.set_result(out.result())
    print("B: {}".format(n))
    in_fut = asyncio.async(a(n+1))
    in_fut.add_done_callback(set_result)
    return fut

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
print("Out is {}".format(loop.run_until_complete(a(0))))


Output:
A: 0
B: 1
A: 2
B: 3
A: 4
B: 5
...
A: 994
B: 995
A: 996
B: 997
A: 998
B: 999
A: 1000
B: 1001
A: 1002
Out is 1002

Now, your example code doesn't actually return n all the way back up the stack, so you could make something functionally equivalent that's a bit simpler:

import asyncio

@asyncio.coroutine
def a(n):
    print("A: {}".format(n))
    if n > 1000: loop.stop(); return n
    else: asyncio.async(b(n+1))

@asyncio.coroutine
def b(n):
    print("B: {}".format(n))
    asyncio.async(a(n+1))

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
asyncio.async(a(0))
loop.run_forever()

But I suspect you really meant to return n all the way back up.

  • Great answer - exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! – caleb May 21 '15 at 21:53
  • @dano, Out of curiosity. In your first code, if a and b are infinite mutual coroutines that never return, this will explode memory with Future objects. correct? What abount the second? – Kenet Jervet Jun 13 '15 at 7:50
0

I changed the code to async, await and measured time. I really like how much more readable it is.

Future:

import asyncio

@asyncio.coroutine
def a(n):
    fut = asyncio.Future()
    def set_result(out):
        fut.set_result(out.result())
    if n > 1000: 
        return n
    else: 
        in_fut = asyncio.async(b(n+1))
        in_fut.add_done_callback(set_result)
    return fut

@asyncio.coroutine
def b(n):
    fut = asyncio.Future()
    def set_result(out):
        fut.set_result(out.result())
    in_fut = asyncio.async(a(n+1))
    in_fut.add_done_callback(set_result)
    return fut

import timeit
print(min(timeit.repeat("""
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(a(0))
""", "from __main__ import a, b, asyncio", number=10)))

Result:

% time python stack_ori.py 
0.6602963969999109
python stack_ori.py  2,06s user 0,01s system 99% cpu 2,071 total

Async, await:

import asyncio

async def a(n):
    if n > 1000:
        return n
    else:
        ret = await asyncio.ensure_future(b(n + 1))
    return ret

async def b(n):
    ret = await asyncio.ensure_future(a(n + 1))
    return ret

import timeit
print(min(timeit.repeat("""
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
loop.run_until_complete(a(0))
""", "from __main__ import a, b, asyncio", number=10)))

Result:

% time  python stack.py
0.45157229300002655
python stack.py  1,42s user 0,02s system 99% cpu 1,451 total
0

In Python 3.7, you can achieve the "trampoline" effect by using asyncio.create_task() instead of awaiting the coroutine directly.

import asyncio

async def a(n):
    print(f"A: {n}")
    if n > 1000: return n
    return await asyncio.create_task(b(n+1))

async def b(n):
    print(f"B: {n}")
    return await asyncio.create_task(a(n+1))

assert asyncio.run(a(0)) == 1002

However, this has the disadvantage that the event loop still needs to keep track of all the intermediate tasks, since each task is awaiting its successor. We can use a Future object to avoid this problem.

import asyncio

async def _a(n, f):
    print(f"A: {n}")
    if n > 1000:
        f.set_result(n)
        return
    asyncio.create_task(_b(n+1, f))

async def _b(n, f):
    print(f"B: {n}}")
    asyncio.create_task(_a(n+1, f))

async def a(n):
    f = asyncio.get_running_loop().create_future()
    asyncio.create_task(_a(0, f))
    return await f

assert asyncio.run(a(0)) == 1002

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.