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I'm trying to understand why java.util.Properties was implemented in this way. It has two interfaces: getProperty/setProperty which only accepts strings, and put/get which accepts any object as a value. These two interfaces appear to be overlapping, so a string added with put() can be retrieved using getProperty().

There seems to be some problems with this weird hybrid interface. Putting an object that overrides a string property has the side-effect of clearing the string value, producing null as the getProperty result. Adding an integer, or some other value that has a simple string translation, might be misunderstood as being a real property value (but as a property it's always null).

My question is: Is there a real, practical reason for this? Or is it a half-baked implementation as I suspect?

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  • I can't back it up, but I'd strongly suspect the problem is backwards compatibility. Properties extends Hashtable, which is an old class from before generics; that means that if you had a Properties, you could have called properties.put(whatever, whateverElse) into it. When generics came along, the Java folks wanted to keep code backwards compatible, which meant having it extend Hashtable<Object, Object>.
    – yshavit
    May 21, 2015 at 18:31
  • Properties is a subclass of Hashtable, with no override of get/put, hence the behavior. getProperty/setProperty are typed versions of get/put. It's a matter of history and not hiding get/put. May 21, 2015 at 18:32

7 Answers 7

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Joshua Bloch mentions this explicitly in Effective Java

[from Chapter 4] In the case of Properties, the designers intended that only strings be allowed as keys and values, but direct access to the underlying Hashtable allows this invariant to be violated. Once this invariant is violated, it is no longer possible to use other parts of the Properties API (load and store). By the time this problem was discovered, it was too late to correct it because clients depended on the use of nonstring keys and values.

That text is in context of using composition over inheritance. He's basically using this as an example of when composition should be used instead of inheritance. If Properties wrapped a Map instead of extending one, it could have enforced the invarient of using String as keys and values.

So the answer is: It was an oversight.

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  • 3
    Choosing this answer because it explains why it was implemented this way, more than just "don't use the other methods". As a side note, the java mail API uses this by design for configuring a custom SSL socket factory. Oh java, the love-hate relationship we have. May 22, 2015 at 17:56
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Access to put and get is a result of Properties being an extension of Hashtable, and the two method should not be used (but cannot be hidden from implementation due to their public access in the superclass).

The Javadocs have a nice note about why you shouldn't use those methods, and should instead only use strings:

Because Properties inherits from Hashtable, the put and putAll methods can be applied to a Properties object. Their use is strongly discouraged as they allow the caller to insert entries whose keys or values are not Strings. The setProperty method should be used instead. If the store or save method is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key or value, the call will fail. Similarly, the call to the propertyNames or list method will fail if it is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key.

As @yshavit notes, it'd make more sense for Properties to extend Hashtable<String, String> than a hashtable of two objects, but this was likely a decision made to maintain backwards compatibility, as any programs using get/put with any non-String objects would have been broken by such a change.

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  • But that doesn't address a crucial part of the question, which is why the get/put methods work on Object instead of String. That is, why doesn't it extend Hashtable<Object, Object>? (Per my comment above, I strongly suspect it's for backwards compatibility -- but I don't have specific evidence.)
    – yshavit
    May 21, 2015 at 18:34
  • @yshavit Good note; I agree that it's almost definitely for backwards compatibility, and I've added such a note into the answer.
    – FThompson
    May 21, 2015 at 18:37
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Official documentations says

Because Properties inherits from Hashtable, the put and putAll methods can be applied to a Properties object. Their use is strongly discouraged as they allow the caller to insert entries whose keys or values are not Strings. The setProperty method should be used instead. If the store or save method is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key or value, the call will fail. Similarly, the call to the propertyNames or list method will fail if it is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/Properties.html

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From the Java Docs

Because Properties inherits from Hashtable, the put and putAll methods can be applied to a Properties object. Their use is strongly discouraged as they allow the caller to insert entries whose keys or values are not Strings. The setProperty method should be used instead. If the store or save method is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key or value, the call will fail. Similarly, the call to the propertyNames or list method will fail if it is called on a "compromised" Properties object that contains a non-String key.

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Properties extends Hashtable, so you can use Properties anywhere you can use a Hashtable.

The Hashtable class is where the get() and put() functions are coming from.

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put(key, value) and get(key) are remainders of a questionable decision to have Properties extend Hashtable back in the day. This behavior can't be changes since it will break backwards compatibility, but any half decent style guide, including the API documentation itself, will recommend to never use these methods.

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As others have said, you're only supposed to use it for Strings. There are ways of serializing an object as a string and retrieving it, but obviously it's not meant for that. I understand that it's really annoying since its the closest you can get to a cross-platform way of saving and retrieving app data. As far as I know there's no official way to save things other than strings in a folder that is hidden from the user, despite the fact that most operating systems have appdata directories.

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