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I tried F# under command line, it doesn't recognize function definition

> let ref f n=
-  if(n<=2)then 1
-  else f(n-1)+f(n-2)
- ;;

val ref : f:(int -> int) -> n:int -> int

> printf "%i" (f 10)
- ;;

  printf "%i" (f 10)
  -------------^

stdin(9,14): error FS0039: The value or constructor 'f' is not defined

Question: any error in my program? I copied and pasted the definition and usage of f into visual studio's F# project, it runs OK.

But Why command line fails?

closed as off-topic by bytebuster, John Palmer, Fyodor Soikin, Carsten, ildjarn May 29 '15 at 23:24

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – bytebuster, John Palmer, Fyodor Soikin, Carsten, ildjarn
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    It seems that you have just mistyped: ref instead of rec. Voted to close for "typographical error" reason. – bytebuster May 22 '15 at 1:38
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You defined a function named ref, but you're trying to call a function named f. No such function was defined (though your ref function takes a parameter named f), so you can't call it.

You probably intended to define a recursive function f using the rec keyword (with a 'c'), rather than defining a function named ref.

I copied and pasted the definition and usage of f into visual studio's F# project, it runs OK.

That's only possible if your VS project already contains a definition of a function named f.

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