9

My setup: gcc-4.9.2, UTF-8 environment.

The following C-program works in ASCII, but does not in UTF-8.

Create input file:

echo -n 'привет мир' > /tmp/вход

This is test.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main(void)
{
  char buf[SIZE+1];
  char *pat = "привет мир";
  char str[SIZE+2];

  FILE *f1;
  FILE *f2;

  f1 = fopen("/tmp/вход","r");
  f2 = fopen("/tmp/выход","w");

  if (fread(buf, 1, SIZE, f1) > 0) {
    buf[SIZE] = 0;

    if (strncmp(buf, pat, SIZE) == 0) {
      sprintf(str, "% 11s\n", buf);
      fwrite(str, 1, SIZE+2, f2);
    }
  }

  fclose(f1);
  fclose(f2);

  exit(0);
}

Check the result:

./test; grep -q ' привет мир' /tmp/выход && echo OK

What should be done to make UTF-8 code work as if it was ASCII code - not to bother how many bytes a symbol takes, etc. In other words: what to change in the example to treat any UTF-8 symbol as a single unit (that includes argv, STDIN, STDOUT, STDERR, file input, output and the program code)?

  • you may check the link nubaria.com/en/blog/?p=289 – Razib May 22 '15 at 3:58
  • 1
    Your grep pattern has a leading space. – tripleee May 22 '15 at 4:14
  • 6
    Also, don't name your programs test, as that is a shell builtin. (./test works, of course; but it's a habit you don't want to keep.) – tripleee May 22 '15 at 4:16
  • @tripleee Space in grep is deliberate (see sprintf). Good point about test. – Igor Liferenko May 22 '15 at 5:17
  • 3
    "привет мир" in UTF-8 is D0 BF D1 80 D0 B8 D0 B2 D0 B5 D1 82 20 D0 BC D0 B8 D1 80 which is far longer than 10 chars – phuclv May 22 '15 at 6:05
10
#define SIZE 10

The buffer size of 10 is insufficient to store the UTF-8 string привет мир. Try changing it to a larger value. On my system (Ubuntu 12.04, gcc 4.8.1), changing it to 20, worked perfectly.

UTF-8 is a multibyte encoding which uses between 1 and 4 bytes per character. So, it is safer to use 40 as the buffer size above. There is a big discussion at How many bytes does one Unicode character take? which might be interesting.

  • Changing SIZE to 20 does not work - OK is not printed (see echo OK check in my question). – Igor Liferenko May 22 '15 at 5:28
  • 2
    You have to do more work than just change SIZE to 20, but that is a key step in the process. – Jonathan Leffler May 22 '15 at 5:42
7

Siddhartha Ghosh's answer gives you the basic problem. Fixing your code requires more work, though.

I used the following script (chk-utf8-test.sh):

echo -n 'привет мир' > вход
make utf8-test
./utf8-test
grep -q 'привет мир' выход && echo OK

I called your program utf8-test.c and amended the source like this, removing the references to /tmp, and being more careful with lengths:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define SIZE 40

int main(void)
{
    char buf[SIZE + 1];
    char *pat = "привет мир";
    char str[SIZE + 2];

    FILE *f1 = fopen("вход", "r");
    FILE *f2 = fopen("выход", "w");

    if (f1 == 0 || f2 == 0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to open one or both files\n");
        return(1);
    }

    size_t nbytes;
    if ((nbytes = fread(buf, 1, SIZE, f1)) > 0)
    {
        buf[nbytes] = 0;

        if (strncmp(buf, pat, nbytes) == 0)
        {
            sprintf(str, "%.*s\n", (int)nbytes, buf);
            fwrite(str, 1, nbytes, f2);
        }
    }

    fclose(f1);
    fclose(f2);

    return(0);
}

And when I ran the script, I got:

$ bash -x chk-utf8-test.sh
+ '[' -f /etc/bashrc ']'
+ . /etc/bashrc
++ '[' -z '' ']'
++ return
+ alias 'r=fc -e -'
+ echo -n 'привет мир'
+ make utf8-test
gcc -O3 -g -std=c11 -Wall -Wextra -Werror utf8-test.c -o utf8-test
+ ./utf8-test
+ grep -q 'привет мир' $'в?\213?\205од'
+ echo OK
OK
$

For the record, I was using GCC 5.1.0 on Mac OS X 10.10.3.

  • You forgot % 11s in sprintf and leading space in grep. Still, OK is not printed. – Igor Liferenko May 22 '15 at 5:51
  • Oh, I forgot to mention that my compiler objects to the space. (What does it do for you — the message mentioned gnu_printf? A space flag is relevant to numeric conversions, but not to string conversions). If I wanted a space at the start, it goes before the %. And I did not forget the 11; I changed the 11 into .* and passed the correct number of bytes as an int argument to printf(). You are not using wide characters; you are using byte strings, and UTF-8 characters are of variable width, though apart from the space, yours are all 2 bytes long in UTF-8. You have to work with bytes. – Jonathan Leffler May 22 '15 at 5:58
  • 1
    If it worked perfectly, why are you asking this question? It didn't work perfectly, did it? Compiling without error is meaningless unless you identify the compiler options you're using. GCC will (by design) accept the most appalling code without complaining by default. – Jonathan Leffler May 22 '15 at 6:06
  • 1
    I've been working out what the difference is between the two commands. It's horridly subtle. What looks like A in both is in fact two different characters: an ordinary Unicode U+0041 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A in the first, but U+0410 CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER A in the second. When I run the scripts, then the first command prints space A, but the second prints just А. I'm not sure what this shows other than that Perl by default does not understand UTF-8. Note that the Perl Unicode documentation discusses 'Byte and Character Semantics'. – Jonathan Leffler May 22 '15 at 6:34
  • 1
    I reserve judgement on what your code shows. The use of %11s completely throws a spanner in the works, AFAICS. I'm certainly completely unsure of what it is supposed to demonstrate. It will take me time — probably multiple days time, given other commitments, such as work — to find out what's going on and how to work around it. Suffice to say that printf() works with single-byte code sets, and tolerates UTF-8 but is unaware of what it means and still counts bytes, not characters. Working with characters requires a lot more work. I tried some wide character code and it failed. …Time… – Jonathan Leffler May 22 '15 at 6:39
4

This is more of a corollary to the other answers, but I'll try to explain this from a slightly different angle.

Here is Jonathan Leffler's version of your code, with three slight changes: (1) I made explicit the actual individual bytes in the UTF-8 strings; and (2) I modified the sprintf formatting string width specifier to hopefully do what you are actually attempting to do. Also tangentially (3) I used perror to get a slightly more useful error message when something fails.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define SIZE 40

int main(void)
{
  char buf[SIZE + 1];
  char *pat = "\320\277\321\200\320\270\320\262\320\265\321\202"
    " \320\274\320\270\321\200";  /* "привет мир" */
  char str[SIZE + 2];

  FILE *f1 = fopen("\320\262\321\205\320\276\320\264", "r");  /* "вход" */
  FILE *f2 = fopen("\320\262\321\213\321\205\320\276\320\264", "w");  /* "выход" */

  if (f1 == 0 || f2 == 0)
    {
      perror("Failed to open one or both files");  /* use perror() */
      return(1);
    }

  size_t nbytes;
  if ((nbytes = fread(buf, 1, SIZE, f1)) > 0)
    {
      buf[nbytes] = 0;

      if (strncmp(buf, pat, nbytes) == 0)
        {
          sprintf(str, "%*s\n", 1+(int)nbytes, buf);  /* nbytes+1 length specifier */
          fwrite(str, 1, 1+nbytes, f2); /* +1 here too */
        }
    }

  fclose(f1);
  fclose(f2);

  return(0);
}

The behavior of sprintf with a positive numeric width specifier is to pad with spaces from the left, so the space you tried to use is superfluous. But you have to make sure the target field is wider than the string you are printing in order for any padding to actually take place.

Just to make this answer self-contained, I will repeat what others have already said. A traditional char is always exactly one byte, but one character in UTF-8 is usually not exactly one byte, except when all your characters are actually ASCII. One of the attractions of UTF-8 is that legacy C code doesn't need to know anything about UTF-8 in order to continue to work, but of course, the assumption that one char is one glyph cannot hold. (As you can see, for example, the glyph п in "привет мир" maps to the two bytes -- and hence, two chars -- "\320\277".)

This is clearly less than ideal, but demonstrates that you can treat UTF-8 as "just bytes" if your code doesn't particularly care about glyph semantics. If yours does, you are better off switching to wchar_t as outlined e.g. here: http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/Extended-Char-Intro.html

However, the standard wchar_t is less than ideal when the standard expectation is UTF-8. See e.g. the GNU libunistring documentation for a less intrusive alternative, and a bit of background. With that, you should be able to replace char with uint8_t and the various str* functions with u8_str* replacements and be done. The assumption that one glyph equals one byte will still need to be addressed, but that becomes a minor technicality in your example program. An adaptation is available at http://ideone.com/p0VfXq (though unfortunately the library is not available on http://ideone.com/ so it cannot be demonstrated there).

  • Actually, I was asking how to use normal UTF-8 in my program, i.e., how to accomplish in C the equivalent of perl -CSDA -Mutf8 Your example does not address my question, although the link that you provided is definitely on the subject. – Igor Liferenko May 23 '15 at 13:08
  • Added another brief paragraph about an alternative to wchar_t. – tripleee May 25 '15 at 11:49
0

Probably your test.c file is not stored in UTF-8 format and for that reason "привет мир" string is ASCII - and the comparison failed. Change text encoding of source file and try again.

0

The following code works as required:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <wchar.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main(void)
{
  setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
  wchar_t buf[SIZE+1];
  wchar_t *pat = L"привет мир";
  wchar_t str[SIZE+2];

  FILE *f1;
  FILE *f2;

  f1 = fopen("/tmp/вход","r");
  f2 = fopen("/tmp/выход","w");

  fgetws(buf, SIZE+1, f1);

  if (wcsncmp(buf, pat, SIZE) == 0) {
    swprintf(str, SIZE+2, L"% 11ls", buf);
    fputws(str, f2);
  }

  fclose(f1);
  fclose(f2);

  exit(0);
}

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