108

Refering to js0n.c

The code syntax is as below:

    static void *gostruct[] =
    {
        [0 ... 255] = &&l_bad,
        ['\t'] = &&l_loop, [' '] = &&l_loop, ['\r'] = &&l_loop, ['\n'] = &&l_loop,
        ['"'] = &&l_qup,
        [':'] = &&l_loop, [','] = &&l_loop,
        ['['] = &&l_up, [']'] = &&l_down, // tracking [] and {} individually would allow fuller validation but is really messy
        ['{'] = &&l_up, ['}'] = &&l_down,
        ['-'] = &&l_bare, [48 ... 57] = &&l_bare, // 0-9
        [65 ... 90] = &&l_bare, // A-Z
        [97 ... 122] = &&l_bare // a-z
    };

........
.......

l_bad:
    *vlen = cur - json; // where error'd
    return 0;

........
........

Can anyone explain what is being done here? What does syntax [0 ... 255] and &&l_bad do here?

0
109

... is an extension provided by GCC

https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Designated-Inits.html#Designated-Inits

To initialize a range of elements to the same value, write [first ... last] = value. This is a GNU extension. For example,

 int widths[] = { [0 ... 9] = 1, [10 ... 99] = 2, [100] = 3 };

&& is another extension

https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Labels-as-Values.html#Labels-as-Values

You can get the address of a label defined in the current function (or a containing function) with the unary operator &&. The value has type void *. This value is a constant and can be used wherever a constant of that type is valid. For example:

 void *ptr;
 /* ... */
 ptr = &&foo;
12
  • 22
    putting it all together that code is making a jump table that uses ascii values for indices, presumably for a parser. May 22 '15 at 9:29
  • 1
    Specifically a JSON parser, so far as I can tell.
    – Kevin
    May 22 '15 at 14:08
  • 1
    @KevinM that makes sense. When did it become a syntax error to apply the address-of operator (&) to an rvalue? I'm guessing in C99, perhaps? The last time I used Visual C++ regularly was around 1998, which would have been the pre-C99 ANSI standard, and the compiler allowed it then (I know because I remember a typo of a doubled-up & getting into production code!). May 22 '15 at 16:22
  • 3
    @dodgethesteamroller && is an entirely separate token from &, so there's no way the standard C grammar could interpret &&x as "address of address of x" regardless of the value category of &x. May 22 '15 at 16:48
  • 4
    @dodgethesteamroller: -- is always parsed as --, and && is always parsed as &&. C99 §6.4¶4: the next preprocessing token is the longest sequence of characters that could constitute a preprocessing token
    – ninjalj
    May 22 '15 at 18:40

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