1

I have an RSA Private key for my SSL certificate. Unfortunately I forgot the passphrase. Here is the header info:

-----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
Proc-Type: 4,ENCRYPTED
DEK-Info: AES-256-CBC,9A3F1B0DB81DA3C64E5BCA3534544E04

I would like to perform a dictionary attack to try to crack it. Could anyone tell me how to do it? Maybe using a tool like John The Ripper.

1

I wrote small python script to do what I wanted. I put the key under the name "ssl.key" and the word list in a file called "wl.lst".

Here's the complete code:

from subprocess import PIPE, Popen
import subprocess
import sys

def cmdline(command):
    proc = subprocess.Popen(str(command), stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, shell=True)
    (out, err) = proc.communicate()
    return err

def combinations(words, length):
    if length == 0:
        return []
    result = [[word] for word in words]
    while length > 1:
        new_result = []
        for combo in result:
            new_result.extend(combo + [word] for word in words)
        result = new_result[:]
        length -= 1
    return result

def main():
    words = [line.strip() for line in open('wl.lst')]
    s = b'writing RSA key\r\n';
    print("\n")

    res = combinations(words, 1)
    c = len(res)-1
    for idx, result in enumerate(res):
        str1 = "openssl rsa -in ssl.key -out ssld.key -passin pass:"+result[0]
        if cmdline(str1) == s:
            print("\nKey Found! The key is: "+result[0])
            sys.exit()
        print(str(idx)+"/"+str(c))
    print("\n")

    res = combinations(words, 2)
    c = len(res)-1
    for idx, result in enumerate(res):
        str1 = "openssl rsa -in ssl.key -out ssld.key -passin pass:"+result[0]+result[1]
        if cmdline(str1) == s:
            print("\nKey Found! The key is: "+result[0]+result[1])
            sys.exit()
        print(str(idx)+"/"+str(c))
    print("\n")

    res = combinations(words, 3)
    c = len(res)-1
    for idx, result in enumerate(res):
        str1 = "openssl rsa -in ssl.key -out ssld.key -passin pass:"+result[0]+result[1]+result[2]
        if cmdline(str1) == s:
            print("\nKey Found! The key is: "+result[0]+result[1]+result[2])
            sys.exit()
        print(str(idx)+"/"+str(c))
    print("\n")

    res = combinations(words, 4)
    c = len(res)-1
    for idx, result in enumerate(res):
        str1 = "openssl rsa -in ssl.key -out ssld.key -passin pass:"+result[0]+result[1]+result[2]+result[3]
        if cmdline(str1) == s:
            print("\nKey Found! The key is: "+result[0]+result[1]+result[2]+result[3])
            sys.exit()
        if idx%25 == 0:
            print(str(idx)+"/"+str(c))
    print("\n")

    res = combinations(words, 5)
    c = len(res)-1
    for idx, result in enumerate(res):
        str1 = "openssl rsa -in ssl.key -out ssld.key -passin pass:"+result[0]+result[1]+result[2]+result[3]+result[4]
        if cmdline(str1) == s:
            print("\nKey Found! The key is: "+result[0]+result[1]+result[2]+result[3]+result[4])
            sys.exit()
        if idx%100 == 0:
            print(str(idx)+"/"+str(c))
    print("\n")

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

This script is cross platform. To increase or decrease the number of words used in a combination, just add/remove appropriate code blocks.

Note: Removing the display of status can considerably improve speed.

| improve this answer | |
  • I had written something similarly. The only downside with that is, that it's horribly slow, as it opens another process for each password. Though, for shorter dictionaries it might still be the most convenient option. – Michael Jun 17 '17 at 11:23
  • Yea it is not the most efficient. But like you said it's good enough for a short dictionary as was my case. – Varghese George Jun 21 '17 at 5:22

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.