2

I need to obtain the Excel 2013 x64 window handle from 64 bit VBA code running in a spreadsheet. There are a couple of options to do this:

    Declare PtrSafe Function FindWindow Lib "user32" Alias "FindWindowA" ( _
           ByVal lpClassName As String, _
           ByVal lpWindowName As String) As LongPtr

The problem is that Application.Hwnd returns a Long, i.e. 32 bits (I've verified this with MsgBox TypeName(Application.Hwnd) within a 64 bit environment), whereas FindWindow returns a LongPtr, which is 64 bits long in Office x64.

Does this mean that the Application.Hwnd property can't be trusted to always be correct in a 64 bit environment?

  • 1
    It's fine, window handles still work as a 32-bit value in 64-bit code. The upper 32 bits are always 0 anyway. – Hans Passant May 22 '15 at 13:36
  • 1
    true@HansPassant. Msdn Ref: Last link in my post. – Siddharth Rout May 22 '15 at 13:37
4

Does this mean that the Application.Hwnd property can't be trusted to always be correct in a 64 bit environment?

No that is not true. The LongPtr is just a variable data type which is a 4-bytes data type on 32-bit versions and an 8-byte data type on 64-bit versions of Office 2010.

You can read more about LongPtr Here

In case the above link dies...

LongPtr (Long integer on 32-bit systems, LongLong integer on 64-bit systems) variables are stored as signed 32-bit (4-byte) numbers ranging in value from -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 on 32-bit systems; and signed 64-bit (8-byte) numbers ranging in value from -9,223,372,036,854,775,808 to 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 on 64-bit systems.

Note

LongPtr is not a true data type because it transforms to a Long in 32-bit environments, or a LongLong in 64-bit environments. Using LongPtr enables writing portable code that can run in both 32-bit and 64-bit environments. Use LongPtr for pointers and handles.

Suggested for further Reading:

Compatibility Between the 32-bit and 64-bit Versions of Office 2010

Followup from comments

However, I'm worried that since FindWindow can return a larger value, a window handle may exceed 32 bits at some stage. And if that's true, then Application.Hwnd would be unable to return the correct value. Or are you saying that a window handle will never exceed 32 bits?

The following link explains it beautifully. Interprocess Communication Between 32-bit and 64-bit Applications

  • Thanks very much for your answer. Let me just make sure we're on the same page: FindWindow returns 64 bits, suggesting that window handles can exceed 32 bits of value. However, Application.Hwnd only returns 32 bits. So if a window handle can exceed the maximum value possible with 32 bits, what happens to Application.Hwnd? – R Hoffmann May 22 '15 at 13:14
  • I am not sure if I understand you. If the application hwnd is say 11872538 then Findwindow would return the same value. You can also use Spy++ to check that. Findwindow in 64 bit uses LongPtrfor compatibility as some application may have bigger hwnds – Siddharth Rout May 22 '15 at 13:24
  • Thanks for your reply. I understand that if the handle is a value between -2,147,483,648 and 2,147,483,647, then both ways would return the same value. However, I'm worried that since FindWindow can return a larger value, a window handle may exceed 32 bits at some stage. And if that's true, then Application.Hwnd would be unable to return the correct value. Or are you saying that a window handle will never exceed 32 bits? – R Hoffmann May 22 '15 at 13:27
  • Or are you saying that a window handle will never exceed 32 bits? I am not sure of this so I will refrain from commenting this. What I can say for sure is that Findwindow and Application.Hwnd will never give you different values for the same window. This can be verified using Spy++ as well – Siddharth Rout May 22 '15 at 13:30
  • 1
    @siddharth-rout - Good answer, but I have no idea what Microsoft actually did with PtrSafe declarations and the LongPtr data type in the compiler, in addition to putting in runtime checks for 32- and 64-bit interoperability: I would speculate that LongPtr addresses and memory do not get garbage-collected in the same way as plain-vanilla integers, as the 'safe pointer' concept is more than just a 32-bit compatibility implementation. – Nigel Heffernan Sep 14 '16 at 10:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.