44

I'm looking for a quick way to turn something like:

let germany = "DE" 

into

let flag = "\u{1f1e9}\u{1f1ea}"

ie, what's the mapping of D to 1f1e9 and E to 1f1ea I was looking at .utf8 for the string, but this returns an integer.

FWIW my general goal is to be able to take an arbitrary country code and get the corresponding emoji flag.

EDIT: I'm also fine with just holding a table that does this mapping if its available somewhere. I googled around but didn't find it.

74

Here's a general formula for turning a two-letter country code into its emoji flag:

func flag(country:String) -> String {
    let base = 127397
    var usv = String.UnicodeScalarView()
    for i in country.utf16 {
        usv.append(UnicodeScalar(base + Int(i)))
    }
    return String(usv)
}

let s = flag("DE")

EDIT Ooops, no need to pass through the nested String.UnicodeScalarView struct. It turns out that String has an append method for precisely this purpose. So:

func flag(country:String) -> String { 
    let base : UInt32 = 127397
    var s = ""
    for v in country.unicodeScalars {
        s.append(UnicodeScalar(base + v.value))
    }
    return s
}

EDIT Oooops again, in Swift 3 they took away the ability to append a UnicodeScalar to a String, and they made the UnicodeScalar initializer failable (Xcode 8 seed 6), so now it looks like this:

func flag(country:String) -> String {
    let base : UInt32 = 127397
    var s = ""
    for v in country.unicodeScalars {
        s.unicodeScalars.append(UnicodeScalar(base + v.value)!)
    }
    return String(s)
}
  • Oh, one more thing: your question title is poor. Try to revise it so that people solving this same problem (turn a country name into a flag) can find it. Thanks. – matt May 22 '15 at 18:13
  • 2
    Obscure magic constants ? :) – What about something like let regionalA = "🇦".unicodeScalars ; let letterA = "A".unicodeScalars ; let base = regionalA[regionalA.startIndex].value - letterA[letterA.startIndex].value ? (Can probably be simplified.) – Martin R May 22 '15 at 18:38
  • @MartinR If we reveal how I arrived at the obscure magic constant, it doesn't look so magic any more! Actually all I did was subtract the ASCII value of "D" from the first codepoint of the German flag string that the OP started with. – matt May 22 '15 at 18:55
  • 2
    I absolutely LOVE that the Emoji guys actually thought about adding the flags to the character set based on an indexing/ordering of the actual ISO country codes! – StijnSpijker Mar 31 '16 at 13:53
  • 2
    See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_Indicator_Symbol The flags start at code point 0x1F1E6. The offset for "A" is 65. 0x1F1E6 - 65 = 127397 – markiv Apr 27 '16 at 11:54
17

If anyone looking for solution in ObjectiveC here is convenient category:

@interface NSLocale (RREmoji)

+ (NSString *)emojiFlagForISOCountryCode:(NSString *)countryCode;

@end


@implementation NSLocale (RREmoji)


+ (NSString *)emojiFlagForISOCountryCode:(NSString *)countryCode {
    NSAssert(countryCode.length == 2, @"Expecting ISO country code");

    int base = 127462 -65;

    wchar_t bytes[2] = {
        base +[countryCode characterAtIndex:0],
        base +[countryCode characterAtIndex:1]
    };

    return [[NSString alloc] initWithBytes:bytes
                                    length:countryCode.length *sizeof(wchar_t)
                                  encoding:NSUTF32LittleEndianStringEncoding];
}


@end

test:

for ( NSString *countryCode in [NSLocale ISOCountryCodes] ) {
    NSLog(@"%@ - %@", [NSLocale emojiFlagForISOCountryCode:countryCode], countryCode);
}

output: 🇦🇩 - AD 🇦🇪 - AE 🇦🇫 - AF 🇦🇬 - AG 🇦🇮 - AI ...

  • 5
    Beware, 🇹🇼 (Taïwan) is missing if your region is set to China (PRC). – Antzi Jul 3 '17 at 8:43
6

Two optimizations of matt's answer.

  • No need to pass through the nested String in Swift 4
  • To avoid pass lower case string, I added uppercased()

Here is the code.

func flag(from country:String) -> String {
    let base : UInt32 = 127397
    var s = ""
    for v in country.uppercased().unicodeScalars {
        s.unicodeScalars.append(UnicodeScalar(base + v.value)!)
    }
    return s
}
2

To give more insight into matt answer

Swift 2 version

public static func flag(countryCode: String) -> Character {
    let base = UnicodeScalar("🇦").value - UnicodeScalar("A").value

    let string = countryCode.uppercaseString.unicodeScalars.reduce("") {
      var string = $0
      string.append(UnicodeScalar(base + $1.value))
      return string
    }

    return Character(string)
  }

Swift 3 version, taken from https://github.com/onmyway133/Smile/blob/master/Sources/Smile.swift#L52

public func emoji(countryCode: String) -> Character {
  let base = UnicodeScalar("🇦").value - UnicodeScalar("A").value

  var string = ""
  countryCode.uppercased().unicodeScalars.forEach {
    if let scala = UnicodeScalar(base + $0.value) {
      string.append(String(describing: scala))
    }
  }

  return Character(string)
}
0

For a more functional approach, using no mutable variables, use this:

private func flag(country: String) -> String {
    let base: UInt32 = 127397
    return country.unicodeScalars
        .flatMap({ UnicodeScalar(base + $0.value) })
        |> String.UnicodeScalarView.init
        |> String.init
}

Where the |> operator is the function application operator, working like a "pipe" for a more natural reading order: We take the scalars, map them into new scalars, turn that into a view, and that into a string.

It's defined like so:

infix operator |> : MultiplicationPrecedence
func |> <T, U>(left: T, right: (T) -> U) -> U {
    return right(left)
}

Without custom operators, we can still do without mutable state, like so:

private func flag(country: String) -> String {
    let base: UInt32 = 127397
    return String(String.UnicodeScalarView(
        country.unicodeScalars.flatMap({ UnicodeScalar(base + $0.value) })
    ))
}

But IMHO, this reads a little "backwards", since the natural flow of operations read neither out-in, nor in-out, but a little bit of both.

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