6

I created some simple code to test casting a char array to int pointer. This works fine as I expected, but when I wrote to the array using the pointer, the data got swapped MSB<-->LSB when I print the c array back out. Why does this happen? Is this an OS dependent thing?

#include "stdio.h"

const int SIZE = 12;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR * argv[]) {
    unsigned char c[SIZE] = {
        1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
    };
    unsigned int * ptr = (unsigned int * ) c;
    int i;

    printf("Int size=%d\n", sizeof(unsigned long));

    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(c); i++) {
        printf("%X, ", c[i]);
    }
    printf("\n\n");

    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(c) / sizeof(unsigned long); i++) { * ptr++ = i;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(c); i++) {
        printf("%X, ", c[i]);
    }

    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

Here is the output:

Int size=4
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C,
0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0,
3
  • 2
    Aside: you should make up your mind whether ptr should be unsigned int* or unsigned long*. – user1084944 May 22 '15 at 23:10
  • you have at least three undefined behaviours due to wrong format specifiers in printf – g-moniava May 23 '15 at 11:41
  • 1
    I would expect the problem to be related to the 'Endian'ness of the underlying hardware. – user3629249 May 23 '15 at 22:11
10

Your architecture is Little Endian, which means the least significant byte is stored first in memory:

enter image description here

In your case 0x00000001 is written in the order [0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00].

1
  • 1
    This wikipedia drawing always throws me off, as they label the memory from the top to bottom, and at a first look you'll say that 0D lies at the "higher" memory location. +1 btw. – vsoftco May 23 '15 at 0:03
8

This is caused by endianness of your CPU architecture. Your architecture seems to be little endian to cause this kind of inversions.

2
  • You are getting confused since, English language is Big-endian annotation.
  • Read from left to right.

Eg: 0xDead is stored like

  0xD      0xE       0xA       0xD
0xADDR  0xADDR+1  0XADDR+2  0xADDR+3   

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