25

For example you could have a directive in angular like so:

angular.module('app')
.directive('classy', function() {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    link: function($scope, $el) {
       $el.addClass('stay-classy');
    }
  }
}

And implement like so:

<div classy></div>

There doesn't seem to be an equivalent in React that I've seen after reading through most the docs and googling. I was hoping for something like:

...
render: function() {
  return (
     <MyComponent classy></MyComponent>
  );
}

Is there something like that possible that I've been missing? Is there a different yet functionally similar equivalent? Or maybe this question just shows that I'm missing some part of the "React way" and I shouldn't ever want to do this. Thanks!

  • 1
    Maybe you could take a few steps back and tell us what problem you're trying to solve. Why do you want to use s <div> with an attribute instead of a component? – Jordan Running May 23 '15 at 4:23
  • 2
    Angular has a lot of stuff that's only needed due to other flaws in angular. Attribute and class directives are necessitated by nearly everything in angular, from required mutability to reliance on what html provides, rather than js. It's not something you need in react. – Brigand May 23 '15 at 4:48
  • 1
    @Jordan I don't have a specific use case in mind, so I guess this more of a general question. I think one benefit of an "attribute" component/directive is the ability to combine multiple component functionalities without explicitly defining a new component. As an example, maybe you have a dropdown component and a tooltip component. Now, I want a dropdown that shows a tooltip on hover. In Angular, you could combine those 2 functionalities on a single element, i.e. <dropdown tooltip="help text"></dropdown> – ccnokes May 23 '15 at 19:31
  • 1
    With <MyComponent classy></MyComponent>, classy is a property not an attribute. React whitelists HTML attributes currently, and anything not in that list and not prefixed with data- is passed as a property instead. Inside the component it can be accessed via this.props.classy. JSX transforms classy into classy=true to match the effect of HTML boolean attributes. – Ross Allen May 23 '15 at 20:11
  • 3
    @Cody Well said. That captures the essence of what I was trying to say above to Jordan. "Is defining a new directive really any different from, or better than, defining a new component?" -- No, of course not, but being able to compose multiple components' functionality via decoration (not creating new "combo" components or something) is more elegant, and something I wish React had. Thanks all for the comments. – ccnokes May 16 '16 at 20:46
25

It will be helpful to consider what Angular and React are each doing "behind the scenes."

In your Angular example, when you write <div classy/></div> you're saying "render a DIV element and then attach to it the behaviors defined by the classy directive.

In your React example, when you write <MyComponent classy></MyComponent>, you're saying, "create an instance of MyComponent and pass it the props { classy: true }. The transpiler (Babel or whathaveyou) will turn it into the following JavaScript:

React.createElement(MyComponent, { classy: true });

So the answer to your question is that you can't write <MyComponent classy></MyComponent> because MyComponent component doesn't know what to do with the classy prop. In React, you might write something like this instead:

class ClassyDiv extends React.Component {
  render() {
    const { className, ...rest } = this.props;
    return <div className={`${className || ''} stay-classy`} {...rest}/>;
  }
}

This works because we know the React.DOM.div component (like most DOM components) knows what to do with the className prop.

Since React 0.14 we can express something like this more simply, as a "pure" stateless functional component, i.e. a function that accepts props and returns the rendered result:

function AlsoClassyDiv(props) {
  const { className, ...rest } = props;
  return <div className={`${className || ''} stay-classy`} {...rest}/>;
};

You can see both approaches in action in the below snippet.

class ClassyDiv extends React.Component {
  render() {
    const { className, ...rest } = this.props;
    return <div className={`${className || ''} stay-classy`} {...rest}/>;
  }
}

function AlsoClassyDiv({ className, ...props }) {
  return <div className={`${className || ''} stay-classy`} {...props}/>;
};

ReactDOM.render(
  <div id="container">
    <div>Regular div</div>
    <ClassyDiv>ClassyDiv!</ClassyDiv>
    <AlsoClassyDiv>AlsoClassyDiv!</AlsoClassyDiv>
  </div>,
  document.body
);
.stay-classy { font: bold 3em Helvetica; text-shadow: 4px 4px 2px #aaa; }
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script><script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    +1 for "in Angular you write HTML and then Angular attaches behaviors to it, but in React you write components...and React generates DOM elements from them". That's a good explanation that illustrates one of the fundamental principles of React and I think would be helpful for anyone transitioning from Angular to React. Thanks! – ccnokes May 24 '15 at 22:50
  • "they're really just JavaScript—and React generates DOM elements from them" - So basically they are components that represent DOM elements, yet they are not DOM elements, they only result into DOM elements. Dude.. React's inverse thinking got to you. – psycho brm Nov 5 '16 at 17:56
  • I wouldn't call it high order component at all, your example is just simple specialization by parent component. High order component is slightly different patern... – Stanislav Šolc Dec 1 '16 at 15:41
  • @StanislavŠolc It's worth noting that this answer was written pre-React 0.14. Would you say that the following, an equivalent React 0.14 pure function component, is a HOC? const ClassyDiv = props => <div className={`${props.className || ''} stay-classy`}/>; – Jordan Running Dec 1 '16 at 15:53
  • @StanislavŠolc To clarify, I'm asking sincerely. I think you're right that my answer is a bit muddled with regard to HOCs, so if you have any suggestions on how to improve it I'd appreciate it. Can I clarify the bit about HOCs or should I omit it entirely? – Jordan Running Dec 1 '16 at 16:03
6

One way you could implement similar behavior is using React class mixins

| improve this answer | |
  • Sounds like Mixins are on their way out -- but (+1) for stating what nobody else has even glanced on. – Cody May 16 '16 at 20:14
4

A great example of a useful directive in angular is

<a href="#target" class="smooth-scroll">Target</a> 

The smoothScroll directive would intercept the click event then use window scroll or jquery scrollTo to apply all manner of animation.

Anywhere in the html one could then simply use the directive powered class name.

This sort of thing is not available in React. To do it in React you would have to create a special link component to use instead of:

<a> like ASmooth....
| improve this answer | |
  • While I agree with you on "To do it in React you would have to create a special link component", in Angular(/JS) you have to create a special attribute directive to attach this behavior to your anchor element. At the same time, your newly created special React link component could render an anchor element in the end as well, with the same behavior attached to it. In the end we get the same result, potatos potatoes. – Bruno Finger Nov 30 '18 at 9:11
  • 3
    @BrunoFinger The whole point of directives is composability. First: you can apply a directive to any component, even components included from other libraries. Second: you can apply multiple directives to the same component. Directives are decorators, so it's not the same thing. – Jens Feb 9 '19 at 23:13
0

Look my friend i didn't get you well but long story short, angularJS directives is actually a component. So the idea behind angularJs directive is to create component that has its own scope data and it's own method to operate on it. I was thinking the same way you did and found your post here and i couldn't find an answer for that. But thanks for working experience, i thought about it and know how to do it.

I wanted to add an edit button for each link item in a list to toggle the edit form for each one only so each ListItem should be a stand alone component, that way i have standalone state for each one and i toggle it on & off.

enter image description here

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