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I am working on an IValueConverter implementation which would convert bool? values. For the sake of versatility I've decided to use TypeConverter to convert input value to bool?. Since its main purpose is to be used as a converter for XAML bindings I'd like to avoid having exceptions thrown as it results in significant decrease of UI performance. To do that I tried using TypeConverter.IsValid method, but came across peculiar behavior, an example of which is shown in the following code:

//returned converter is a NullableConverter
var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(bool?));

//this method returns false
converter.IsValid(string.Empty);

//yet this method returns null without throwing an exception
converter.ConvertFrom(string.Empty);

Perhaps I'm wrong, but I'd expect the IsValid method to return false whenever a value cannot be converted and true otherwise, but clearly that's not the case with an empty string and NullableConverter (same behavior can be observed for other nullable types).

Is this a bug or rather a design choice? And if the latter, are there any other similar cases?

EDIT

After inspecting the source code for NullableConverter I think I've found the reason for this behavior. Here's the IsValid implementation:

public override bool IsValid(ITypeDescriptorContext context, object value) {
    if (simpleTypeConverter != null) {
        object unwrappedValue = value;
        if (unwrappedValue == null) {
            return true; // null is valid for nullable.
        }
        else {
            return simpleTypeConverter.IsValid(context, unwrappedValue);
        }
    }

    return base.IsValid(context, value);
}        

In my case the simpleTypeConverter is of type BooleanConverter and, understandably, it returns false for string.Empty. On the other hand, here's the ConvertFrom implementation:

public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, CultureInfo culture, object value) {
    if (value == null || value.GetType() == this.simpleType) {
        return value;
    }
    else if (value is String && String.IsNullOrEmpty(value as String)) {
        return null;
    }
    else if (this.simpleTypeConverter != null) {
        object convertedValue = this.simpleTypeConverter.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
        return convertedValue;
    }
    else {
        return base.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
    }
}

Obviously, string.Empty falls into the second if statement, hence the null result without an exception.

Knowing the reason for this behavior the question still remains - is it an oversight, or is it intended to work this way? I've submitted a bug report and will post any conclusions to come out of it.

6
  • 2
    When I try your example IsValid throws a FormatException with message String was not recognized as a valid Boolean. However, the documentations says that "Starting in .NET Framework 4, the IsValid method catches exceptions from the CanConvertFrom and ConvertFrom methods. If the input value type causes CanConvertFrom to return false, or if the input value causes ConvertFrom to raise an exception, the IsValid method returns false." – Marius Bancila May 23 '15 at 21:05
  • Also funny that myNullableConverter.ConvertToString(null) returns an empty string. I guess null is not valid for a Nullable<T>? – C.Evenhuis May 23 '15 at 21:07
  • 1
    @MariusBancila I've just tested the code targeting framework versions ranging from 2.0 up to 4.5.1, and not in any case neither ConvertFrom nor IsValid threw an exception. Interestingly though, up to and including version 3.5 IsValid returned true... Is it possible that ConvertFrom "swallows" the exception? – Grx70 May 23 '15 at 21:23
  • According to the docs it should swallow exceptions starting with .NET 4.0. But I tested in a .NET 4.5 project. So I don't get it. – Marius Bancila May 23 '15 at 21:25
  • 3
    It is not a bug. From the MSDN description of TypeConverter.IsValid: "The IsValid method is used to validate a value within the type rather than to determine if value can be converted to the given type. For example, IsValid can be used to determine if a given value is valid for an enumeration type." – Hans Passant May 24 '15 at 13:46
1

What different people expect in some of these situations probably isn't the same, but to me the behavior given by the framework in this case seems reasonable.

For example: in the following cases, the behavior seems perfectly reasonable to me.

var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(bool?));

bool? nullableBool1 = converter.ConvertFrom(string.Empty); // returns null
bool? nullableBool2 = converter.ConvertFrom("true"); // returns true
bool? nullableBool3 = converter.ConvertFrom("false"); // returns false

bool? nullableBool4 = converter.ConvertFromString(string.Empty); // returns null
bool? nullableBool5 = converter.ConvertFromString("true"); // returns true
bool? nullableBool6 = converter.ConvertFromString("false"); // returns false

From @C.Evenhuis' comment, this is the behavior that I believe was deemed questionable.

var converter = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(bool?));
var string1 = converter.ConvertToString(null); // returns ""
var string2 = converter.ConvertToString(true); // returns "true"
var string3 = converter.ConvertToString(false); // returns "false"

ConvertToString is doing something which I find very good. If you'll note, var isNullAString = null is string returns false! It makes more sense to me for null to be converted into an empty string, even if that's not what you were expecting.

As to the last unaddressed part in your question..

Perhaps I'm wrong, but I'd expect the IsValid method to return false whenever a value cannot be converted and true otherwise, but clearly that's not the case with an empty string and NullableConverter (same behavior can be observed for other nullable types).

I believe this was satisfactorily answered in a comment above, which stated

The IsValid method is used to validate a value within the type rather than to determine if value can be converted to the given type. For example, IsValid can be used to determine if a given value is valid for an enumeration type.

0

The Reason you are having the issue is because String.Empty is a class vs "" is a Literal. It is a ReadOnly Varialble. which that means it is a NULL Variable of type string.

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