0

I have a header-only C++ library with several namespaces.

For example one header file may contain

//header1.h
namespace library{
namespace componentA{
   template<typename T>
   class Someclass{};
}
}

And another one

//header2.h
namespace library{
namespace componentB{
   template<typename T>
   class SomeOtherClass{
       void Foo(const componentA::Someclass<T>& reference);
       void Bar(const componentA::Someclass<T>& reference);
   };
}
}

Now while this works, having a header-only library it becomes tedious to write the namespace again and again, especially when you are having multiple classes and nested namespaces involved.

So I did this:

//new header2.h
namespace library{
namespace componentB{

   using namespace componentA;

   template<typename T>
   class SomeOtherClass{
       void Foo(const Someclass<T>& reference);
       void Bar(const Someclass<T>& reference);
       void FooBar(const Someclass<T>& reference);
       void FooWithBar(const Someclass<T>& reference);
   };
}
}

While this is certainly more convenient to type, it has the problem that now a client of the library can also use Someclass<T> by using the componentB namespace like this, which leads to an ambiguous interface and ultimately to inconsistent code. For example a client now could use componentB::Someclass<T> even though it is originally defined in componentA

Is there a way to get the shorthand only available "privately"?

3

If I understand your question correctly, then the answer is no. If typing/reading componentA:: before type names from the componentA namespace is too much of a problem (honestly, that would be my preference), then you could use short namespace aliases:

namespace library { namespace componentB
{
// ...
namespace ca = componentA;
// ...
void foo(ca::SomeClass<T>);
// ...
} }

In any case, I discourage using directives in header files: they lead to name clashes and maintenance issues.

  • yes, this would be a possibility to avoid typing the whole name, however a client could still access library::componentB::ca::Someclass<T> then... – worenga May 23 '15 at 21:28
  • @mightyuhu: Yes. This is unavoidable I'm afraid. AFAIK C++'s system based on translation units and include files does not offer better alternatives. – Andy Prowl May 23 '15 at 21:30
  • if you are interested see my answer, maybe i've overseen something – worenga May 23 '15 at 23:04
2
namespace library {
  namespace componentAImpl{
    using ::library::componentB;
    // ...
    inline namespace exports{
      struct foo{};
    }
  }
  namespace componentA{
    using namespace library::componentAImpl::exports;
  }
}

users can access componentAImpl, but should not.

Meanwhile, a clean set of symbols are exposed in library::componentA.

  • 1
    Nice. I think this is the correct solution /cc @mightyuhu – Andy Prowl May 24 '15 at 10:41
  • @andy I might use a different library namespace, and start names with details_ to avoid tempting code-completors. And I am uncertain about how the ADL will work in some cases. So you'd have to deploy it and see if it has rough spots (I haven't used the above pattern in my code before). – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont May 24 '15 at 10:51
1

Well, C++ 11? Using-declaration introduces a member of another namespace into current namespace or block scope.

namespace library{

    namespace componentB{

       using componentA::SomeOtherClass;

       template<typename T>
       SomeOtherClass{
           void Foo(const Someclass<T>& reference);
           void Bar(const Someclass<T>& reference);
           void FooBar(const Someclass<T>& reference);
           void FooWithBar(const Someclass<T>& reference);
       };
    }

}
  • This won't change the fact that clients can write componentB::SomeOtherClass even though SomeOtherClass lives in namespace componentA. – Andy Prowl May 23 '15 at 21:28
  • Andy Prowl, of course but that would be the other scope? – Alexander V May 23 '15 at 21:30
  • I'm not sure i understand what you mean – Andy Prowl May 23 '15 at 21:31
  • I would make an additional block scope to prevent that. – Alexander V May 23 '15 at 21:33
  • can you show me how? – worenga May 23 '15 at 21:33
0

I figured Out the solution myself after a while of thinking. Unfortunately this is not straightforward.

//header1.h
namespace lib_noexport{

namespace library{
namespace componentA{
   template<typename T>
   class Someclass{};
}
}
}
}

using namespace lib_noexport;

And then

//header2.h
namespace lib_noexport{

using library::componentA::Someclass;

namespace library{

    namespace componentB{

       template<typename T>
       class SomeOtherClass{
           void Foo(const Someclass<T>& reference){}
       };
    }
}

}
using namespace lib_noexport;

Now this yields the following:

library::componentB::SomeOtherClass<int> a; //works as expected
Someclass<int> b; //error
library::componentB::Someclass<int> c; //error
library::componentA::Someclass<int> b; //works

Still, the user could be stupid enough to use the undocumented lib_noexport:: but then i cannot help her any more..

  • Do you need the inner namespace? – Andy Prowl May 23 '15 at 23:10
  • actually no, you are right. – worenga May 23 '15 at 23:24

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