15

Ok so I think I get what super does standalone. Basically in Devise, if Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController, then on any action, having a super will first call the logic for that same named action in the parent Devise::RegistrationsController, before then calling what you've written.

In other words...

class Devise::RegistrationsController
  def new
    puts "this is in the parent controller"
  end
end

class Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  def new
    super
    puts "this is in the child controller"
  end
end

# Output if users#new is run would be:
# => "this is in the parent controller"
# => "this is in the child controller"

# If super were reversed, and the code looked like this
# class Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  #  def new
    #  puts "this is in the child controller"
    #  super
  #  end
#  end
# Then output if users#new is run would be:
# => "this is in the child controller"
# => "this is in the parent controller"

What I'm curious about is that I've seen some people do this:

class Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  def new
    super do |user|
      puts "something"
    end
  end
end

I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around what the do block is accomplishing. In my case, after the resource (the user) is created, I want to call an additional method on that resource (the user).

Current code:

class Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  def new
    super do |user|
      user.charge_and_save_customer
      puts user.inspect
    end
  end
end

I'm just wondering if this would be any different than doing:

class Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  def new
    super
    resource.charge_and_save_customer
    puts resource.inspect
  end
end

In case it's helpful, I've included the parent Devise::RegistrationsController code below:

def new
  build_resource({})
  set_minimum_password_length
  yield resource if block_given?
  respond_with self.resource
end
1
  • well their new method takes a block (hence the yield)
    – Anthony
    May 24, 2015 at 18:35

1 Answer 1

22

Let me try to explain what is going on here:

class Users::RegistrationsController < Devise::RegistrationsController
  def new
    super do |user|
      user.charge_and_save_customer
      puts user.inspect
    end
  end
end

When you call super, you are going back to the parent new action, so the following code will be executing now:

def new
  build_resource({})
  set_minimum_password_length
  yield resource if block_given?
  respond_with self.resource
end

But wait... here is an yield, so it yields the current resource to the block, you can think of the block like a method, it needs a parameter (user), and here resource (from parent) will be the parameter:

# Here resource is assigned to user
user.charge_and_save_customer
puts user.inspect

Now, since the block is executed completely, it will start executing the super again:

respond_with self.resource
1
  • 2
    I see, so in this case, since there's a super and a yield to the block, then basically the code in the super do gets executed wherever the yield is called. In this case, it allows me to inject code in the middle of the parent action. If there were NOT a yield statement, then super do would be useless, and super by itself would run the entirety of the parent action (meaning I could inject code either at the beginning or end). Is that correct?
    – james
    May 24, 2015 at 19:19

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