I've been playing with some Perl programs to calculate excellent numbers. Although the runtimes for my solutions were acceptable, I thought a different language, especially one designed for numeric stuff, might be faster. A friend suggested Julia, but the performance I'm seeing is so bad I must be doing something wrong. I've looked through the Performance Tips and don't see what I should improve:

digits = int( ARGS[1] )

const k = div( digits, 2 )

for a = ( 10 ^ (k - 1) ) : ( 10 ^ (k) - 1 )
    front = a * (10 ^ k + a)

    root = floor( front ^ 0.5 )

    for b = ( root - 1 ): ( root + 1 )
        back = b * (b - 1);
        if back > front
            break
        end
        if log(10,b) > k
            continue
        end
        if front == back
            @printf "%d%d\n" a b
        end
    end
 end

I have an equivalent C program that's an order of magnitude faster instead of the factor of 2 noted on the Julia page (although most of the Stackoverflow questions about Julia's speed seem to point out flawed benchmarks from that page):

And the non-optimized pure Perl I wrote takes half as long:

use v5.20;

my $digits = $ARGV[0] // 2;
die "Number of digits must be even and non-zero! You said [$digits]\n"
    unless( $digits > 0 and $digits % 2 == 0 and int($digits) eq $digits );

my $k  = ( $digits / 2 );

foreach my $n ( 10**($k-1) .. 10**($k) - 1 ) {
    my $front = $n*(10**$k + $n);
    my $root = int( sqrt( $front ) );

    foreach my $try ( $root - 2 .. $root + 2 ) {
        my $back = $try * ($try - 1);
        last if length($try) > $k;
        last if $back > $front;
        # say "\tn: $n back: $back try: $try front: $front";
        if( $back == $front ) {
            say "$n$try";
            last;
            }
        }
    }

I'm using the pre-compiled Julia for Mac OS X since I couldn't get the source to compile (but I didn't try beyond it blowing up the first time). I figure that's part of it.

Also, I see about a 0.7 second start up time for any Julia program (see Slow Julia Startup Time), which means the equivalent compiled C program can run about 200 times before Julia finishes once. As the runtime increases (bigger values of digits) and the startup time means less, my Julia program is still really slow.

I haven't gotten to the part for very large numbers (20+ digit excellent numbers) which I didn't realize Julia doesn't handle those any better than most other languages.


Here's my C code, which is a little different from when I started this. My rusty, inelegant C skills are essentially the same thing as my Perl.

#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main( int argc, char *argv[] ) {
    long 
        k, digits,
        start, end,
        a, b,
        front, back,
        root
        ;

    digits = atoi( argv[1] );

    k = digits / 2;

    start = (long) pow(10, k - 1);
    end   = (long) pow(10, k);

    for( a = start; a < end; a++ ) {
        front = (long) a * ( pow(10,k) + a );
        root  = (long) floor( sqrt( front ) );

        for( b = root - 1; b <= root + 1; b++ ) {
            back = (long) b * ( b - 1 );
            if( back > front )  { break; }
            if( log10(b) > k ) { continue; }
            if( front == back ) {
                printf( "%ld%ld\n", a, b );
                }
            }
        }

    return 0;
    }
  • 2
    You should include your actual benchmark timings, and some description of how you obtained them. – jpmc26 May 26 '15 at 0:37
  • The standard library is pre-compiled in v0.3, but nothing else, hence the 0.7 second start up time. It looks like we're going to get compilation of packages in v0.4 - apparently it is already possible if you want to play around a bit (see here). So in other words, slowly but surely the obstacles to reducing start-up time are being knocked over one-by-one. – Colin T Bowers May 26 '15 at 0:48
  • 1
    Also, wrapping your code in a function as suggested by @VincentZoonekynd gives a four factor speed-up on my machine. Not quite the performance you're after, but getting there. – Colin T Bowers May 26 '15 at 0:51
  • 1
    Huh... What do you know? Slow run-time of the log function in Julia is issue #8869 on github. So I guess what you might be seeing here is simply some of the wrinkles that will hopefully be ironed out by v1.0. – Colin T Bowers May 26 '15 at 1:11
  • 5
    I didn't see any speed-up by wrapping the code in a function -that is odd. Moving from global to local scope provided a big speed-up for me. You would need to provide more detail on exactly how you are running your code to go further here (perhaps you are already in local scope)... I guess the answer is that Julia is slow -that is a very broad conclusion to draw from one very specific example on a language that is in beta. I'm sure you didn't mean it that way, but it comes across as inflammatory. – Colin T Bowers May 26 '15 at 2:23

I've benchmarked your code (brian.jl) against the following code, which attempts to make minimal changes to your code and follows Julian style:

function excellent(digits)
    k = div(digits, 2)
    l = 10 ^ (k - 1)
    u = (10 ^ k) - 1

    for a in l:u
        front = a * (10 ^ k + a)
        root = isqrt(front)
        for b = (root - 1):(root + 1)
            back = b * (b - 1)
            back > front && break
            log10(b) > k && continue
            front == back && println(a,b)
        end
    end
end
excellent(int(ARGS[1]))

Separating out u and l was a personal preference for readability. As a baseline, the Julia startup time on my machine is:

$ time julia -e ''
real    0m0.248s
user    0m0.306s
sys 0m0.091s

So if the computation you are running per execution of Julia from a cold start is on the order of 0.3 seconds, then Julia might not be a great choice for you at this stage. I passed in 16 to the scripts, and got:

$ time julia brian.jl 16
1045751633986928
1140820035650625
3333333466666668

real    0m15.973s
user    0m15.691s
sys     0m0.586s

and

$ time julia iain.jl 16
1045751633986928
1140820035650625
3333333466666668

real    0m9.691s
user    0m9.839s
sys     0m0.155s

A limitation of this code as written is that if digits>=20 we will exceed the storage of a Int64. Julia, for performance reasons, doesn't auto-promote integer types to arbitrary precision integers. We can use our knowledge of the problem to address this by changing the last line to:

digits = int(ARGS[1])
excellent(digits >= 20 ? BigInt(digits) : digits)

We get the BigInt version of excellent for free, which is nice. Ignoring that for now, on profiling my version I found that ~74% of the time is spent calculating log10, following by ~19% on isqrt. I did this profiling by replacing the last line with

excellent(4)  # Warm up to avoid effects of JIT
@profile excellent(int(ARGS[1]))
Profile.print()

Now if we wanted to dabble in minor algorithmic changes, given what we know now from the profiler, we can replace the log10 line (which is just checking the number of digits in effect) with ndigits(b) > k && continue, which gives us

$ time julia iain.jl 16
1045751633986928
1140820035650625
3333333466666668

real    0m3.634s
user    0m3.785s
sys     0m0.153s

This changes the balance to about ~56% from the isqrt and ~28% from ndigits. Digging further into that 56%, about half is spent executing this line which seems like a pretty sensible algorithm, so any improvement would probably change the spirit of the comparison as it'd really be a different approach altogether. Investigating the machine code with @code_native tends to suggest there is nothing else too strange going on, although I didn't dig deep into this.

If I allow myself to engage in some more minor algorithmic improvements, I can start from root+1 and only doing the ndigits check once, i.e.

for a in l:u
    front = a * (10^k + a)
    root = isqrt(front)
    b = root + 1
    ndigits(b) > k && continue
    front == b*(b-1) && println(a,b)
    b = root
    front == b*(b-1) && println(a,b)
    b = root - 1
    front == b*(b-1) && println(a,b)
end

which gets me down to

real    0m2.901s
user    0m3.050s
sys     0m0.154s

(I'm not convinced the second two equality checks are needed, but I'm trying to minimize differences!). Finally I thought I'd eke out some extra speed by precomputing 10^k, i.e. k10 = 10^k, which seems to be computed freshly each iteration. With that, I get to

real    0m2.518s
user    0m2.670s
sys     0m0.153s

Which is a fairly nice 20x improvement over the original code.

  • We can have the extra precision and wait days to see an answer, but that's not unique to Julia. :) – brian d foy May 26 '15 at 5:01
  • How did you profile it? – brian d foy May 26 '15 at 5:03
  • I used the in-built profiler - I'll update the answer. – IainDunning May 26 '15 at 5:03

I was curious about how Perl was getting such good performance from this code, so I felt I ought to do a comparison. Since there are some seemingly needless differences in both control flow and operations between the Perl and Julia versions of the code in the question, I ported each version to the other language and compared all four. I also wrote a fifth Julia version using more idiomatic numerical functions but with the same control flow structure as the question's Perl version.

The first variant is essentially the Perl code from the question, but wrapped up in a function:

sub perl1 {
    my $k = $_[0];
    foreach my $n (10**($k-1) .. 10**($k)-1) {
        my $front = $n * (10**$k + $n);
        my $root = int(sqrt($front));

        foreach my $t ($root-2 .. $root+2) {
            my $back = $t * ($t - 1);
            last if length($t) > $k;
            last if $back > $front;
            if ($back == $front) {
                print STDERR "$n$t\n";
                last;
            }
        }
    }
}

Next, I translated this to Julia, keeping the same control flow and using the same operations – it takes the integer floor of the square root of front in the outer loop and takes the length of the "stringification" of t in the inner loop:

function julia1(k)
    for n = 10^(k-1):10^k-1
        front = n*(10^k + n)
        root = floor(Int,sqrt(front))

        for t = root-2:root+2
            back = t * (t - 1)
            length(string(t)) > k && break
            back > front && break
            if back == front
                println(STDERR,n,t)
                break
            end
        end
    end
end

Here's the question's Julia code with some minor formatting tweaks, wrapped up in a function:

function julia2(k)
    for a = 10^(k-1):10^k-1
        front = a * (10^k + a)
        root = floor(front^0.5)

        for b = root-1:root+1
            back = b * (b - 1);
            back > front && break
            log(10,b) > k && continue
            if front == back
                @printf STDERR "%d%d\n" a b
                # missing break?
            end
        end
    end
end

I translated this back to Perl, keeping the same control flow structure and using the same operations as the Perl code – taking floor of root raised to the 0.5 power in the outer loop, and taking the logarithm base 10 in the inner loop:

sub perl2 {
    my $k = $_[0];
    foreach my $a (10**($k-1) .. 10**($k)-1) {
        my $front = $a * (10**$k + $a);
        my $root = int($front**0.5);

        foreach my $b ($root-1 .. $root+1) {
            my $back = $b * ($b - 1);
            last if $back > $front;
            next if log($b)/log(10) > $k;
            if ($front == $back) {
                print STDERR "$a$b\n"
            }
        }
    }
}

Finally, I wrote a Julia version that has the same control flow structure as the question's Perl version but uses more idiomatic numerical operations – the isqrt and ndigits functions:

function julia3(k)
    for n = 10^(k-1):10^k-1
        front = n*(10^k + n)
        root = isqrt(front)

        for t = root-2:root+2
            back = t * (t - 1)
            ndigits(t) > k && break
            back > front && break
            if back == front
                println(STDERR,n,t)
                break
            end
        end
    end
end

As far as I know (I used to do a lot of Perl programming, but it's been a while), there aren't Perl versions of either of these operations, so there's no corresponding perl3 variant.

I ran all five variations with Perl 5.18.2 and Julia 0.3.9, respectively, ten times each for 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 digits. Here are the timing results:

median execution time in seconds vs. digits

The x axis is the number of digits requested. The y axis is median time in seconds required to compute each function. The y axis is plotted on a log scale (there's some rendering bug in the Cairo backend of Gadfly, so the superscripts don't appear very raised). We can see that except for the very smallest number of digits (2), all three Julia variants are faster than both Perl variants – and julia3 is substantially faster than everything else. How much faster? Here's a comparison of the other four variants relative to julia3 (not log scale):

time relative to julia3 vs. digits

The x axis is the number of digits requested again, while the y axis is how many times slower each variant was than julia3. As you can see here, I was unable to reproduce the Perl performance claimed in the question – the Perl code was not 2x faster than Julia – it was 7 to 40 times slower than julia3 and at least 2x slower than the slowest Julia variant for any non-trivial number of digits. I didn't test with Perl 5.20 – perhaps someone could follow up by running these benchmarks with a newer Perl and see if that explains the different results? Code to run the benchmarks can be found here: excellent.pl, excellent.jl. I ran the them like this:

cat /dev/null >excellent.csv
for d in 2 4 6 8 10 12 14; do
    perl excellent.pl $d >>excellent.csv
    julia excellent.jl $d >>excellent.csv
done

I analyzed the resulting excellent.csv file using this Julia script.

Finally, as has been mentioned in the comments, using BigInt or Int128 is an option for exploring larger excellent numbers in Julia. However, this requires a little care for writing the algorithm generically. Here's a fourth variation that works generically:

function julia4(k)
    ten = oftype(k,10)
    for n = ten^(k-1):ten^k-1
        front = n*(ten^k + n)
        root = isqrt(front)

        for t = root-2:root+2
            back = t * (t - 1)
            ndigits(t) > k && break
            back > front && break
            if back == front
                println(STDERR,n,t)
                break
            end
        end
    end
end

This is the same as julia3 but works for generic integer types by converting 10 to the type of its argument. Since the algorithm scales exponentially, however, it still takes a very long time to compute for any number of digits much larger than 14:

julia> @time julia4(int128(10)) # digits = 20
21733880705143685100
22847252005297850625
23037747345324014028
23921499005444619376
24981063345587629068
26396551105776186476
31698125906461101900
33333333346666666668
34683468346834683468
35020266906876369525
36160444847016852753
36412684107047802476
46399675808241903600
46401324208242096401
48179452108449381525
elapsed time: 2260.27479767 seconds (5144 bytes allocated)

It works, but 37 minutes is kind of a long time to wait. Using a faster programming language only gets you a constant factor speedup – 40x in this case – but that only buys a couple of extra digits. To really explore larger excellent numbers, you'll need to look into better algorithms.

  • 2
    Yeah, the Perl and Julia versions in the question are pretty different. That's why I ported them both ways and did the multiway comparison. – StefanKarpinski May 27 '15 at 21:22
  • 3
    @briandfoy – you wrote "the non-optimized pure Perl I wrote takes half as long". What was the comparison to if not the Julia version? – StefanKarpinski May 27 '15 at 23:01
  • 2
    The comparison to C would also be interesting. I would expect that calling the same functions in Julia as called in C would produce the same performance. The julia3 variant, which is 40x faster than Perl is in the right ballpark. If you post the C code as well, we could add that to these benchmarks. – StefanKarpinski May 27 '15 at 23:12
  • 3
    This is a great comparison. Nicely done. That said, I believe all of @briandfoy's performance issues stemmed from timing the Julia code externally as a standalone script, which includes startup and compilation time. Julia is in this strange middle-ground; you wouldn't include compilation time in a C benchmark, but since we don't support caching or outputting compiled binaries yet it's not entirely unreasonable to include it for Julia. – Matt B. May 27 '15 at 23:49
  • 1
    Well, to be fair I think the performance of log() has a lot to do with it, and I was using some functions that had to do implicit conversions. I posted my C code, which is a straight port from my Perl. – brian d foy May 28 '15 at 0:43

I get a big speedup when I use ifloor (which isn't listed in Mathematical Operations and Elementary Functions) instead of floor. Getting rid of either floor in favor of isqrt shows the same speedup. I don't see where that is documented either.

Now I see performance that I would expect, although on my Mac, it looks like Julia couldn't start k = 10. BigInt can help that but then the performance is rotten. Part of the reason I looked at Julia was my hope that it could easily handle bigger numbers, so I'll have to keep looking at that.

The rest of the expected speed might be hidden in the implementation of the logarithm algorithms, as Colin noted in the comments.

I had fun checking out this language, and maybe I'll try again when it's mature.

  • Final thought: You could likely get further optimisations from the julia-users group. The core devs regularly monitor the threads, and questions about performance are taken very seriously... – Colin T Bowers May 26 '15 at 4:28
  • 5
    ifloor is in the 0.3 docs (current release), but has been deprecated in the development version (which are the docs you're seeing) in favour of floor(Int,x) – Simon Byrne May 26 '15 at 10:55
  • Here is the 0.3 manual – IainDunning May 26 '15 at 20:11

You can try to to put your code in a function.

function excellent(k)
  for a = ( 10 ^ (k - 1) ) : ( 10 ^ (k) - 1 )
    front = a * (10 ^ k + a)
    root = ifloor( sqrt(front) ) # floor() returns a double

    for b = ( root - 1 ): ( root + 1 )
      back = b * (b - 1);
      if back > front
        break
      end
      if log(10,b) > k
        continue
      end
      if front == back
        @printf "%d%d\n" a b
      end
   end
  end
end

@time excellent(7)
## 33333346666668
## 48484848484848
## elapsed time: 1.451842881 seconds (14680 bytes allocated)

For arbitrary-precision numbers, you can use BigInt (e.g., ten = BigInt("10"), but the performance drops...

  • I tried putting the code in a function. There was no difference in time. 1.45 seconds is very, very slow. – brian d foy May 26 '15 at 1:53
  • This code doesn't work for me with k > 8. I get a DomainError. – brian d foy May 26 '15 at 2:48
  • This also doesn't take the number of digits from the command line, which is a very useful part of the program. – brian d foy May 26 '15 at 3:00
  • 1
    @briandfoy isqrt might help with that step – Colin T Bowers May 26 '15 at 3:19
  • 1
    I removed the command-line argument part of your program because I could see no obvious improvement to make to it. The argument of the function is k, which is half the number of digits: 7 corresponds to 14 digits, for which your Perl program took 15 seconds on my machine. The DomainError is caused by integer overflow: front becomes negative, and the square root fails. For k>9, you could use longer integers: Int128 is only 3 times slower and will allow twice as many digits. – Vincent Zoonekynd May 26 '15 at 14:25

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