I am confused with borrowing and ownership. In the Rust documentation about reference and borrowing

let mut x = 5;
{
    let y = &mut x;
    *y += 1;
}
println!("{}", x);

They say

println! can borrow x.

I am confused by this. If println! borrows x, why does it pass 'x' not '&x'?

I try to run this code below

fn main() {
    let mut x = 5;
    {
        let y = &mut x;
        *y += 1;
    }
    println!("{}", &x);
}

This code is identical with the code above except I pass '&x' to println!. It prints '6' to the console which is correct and is the same result as the first code.

up vote 35 down vote accepted

The macros print!, println!, eprint!, eprintln!, write!, writeln! and format! are a special case, not behaving as normal things do for reasons of convenience. The fact that they take references silently is part of that difference.

fn main() {
    let x = 5;
    println!("{}", x);
}

Run it through rustc -Z unstable-options --pretty expanded on the nightly compiler and we can see what println! expands to:

#![feature(prelude_import)]
#![no_std]
#[prelude_import]
use std::prelude::v1::*;
#[macro_use]
extern crate std as std;
fn main() {
    let x = 5;
    ::io::_print(::std::fmt::Arguments::new_v1(
        {
            static __STATIC_FMTSTR: &'static [&'static str] = &["", "\n"];
            __STATIC_FMTSTR
        },
        &match (&x,) {
            (__arg0,) => {
                [
                    ::std::fmt::ArgumentV1::new(__arg0, ::std::fmt::Display::fmt),
                ]
            }
        },
    ));
}

Tidied a lot, it’s this:

use std::fmt;
use std::io;

fn main() {
    let x = 5;
    io::_print(fmt::Arguments::new_v1(
        &["", "\n"];
        &[fmt::ArgumentV1::new(&x, fmt::Display::fmt)],
    ));
}

Note the &x.

If you write println!("{}", &x), you are then dealing with two levels of references; this has the same result because there is an implementation of std::fmt::Display for &T where T implements Display (shown as impl<'a, T> Display for &'a T where T: Display + ?Sized) which just passes it through. You could just as well write &&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&x.

  • I don't understand why you'd call those macros a "special case". This kind of implicit reference-passing can be implemented for any macro. – Markus Unterwaditzer Nov 29 '15 at 13:06
  • 4
    @MarkusUnterwaditzer: Sure, but the thing is that it looks normal but isn’t. And sure, other macros can make themselves special cases too. The fact is that it’s strongly advised against in general. – Chris Morgan Dec 3 '15 at 12:55

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