-5

This question already has an answer here:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   int i=-3,j=2,k=0,m;
   m = ++i || ++j && ++k;
   printf("%d %d %d %d", i, j, k, m);
}

Output :

-2 2 0 1

Why should the expression m=++i||++j&&++k; not parsed as m=++i||(++j&&++k) as the precedence of && is higher than || ??

marked as duplicate by M.M c May 26 '15 at 8:09

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  • Quite a coincidence that your program uses the exact same variables and values as the duplicate question. :) – Barmar May 26 '15 at 7:53
  • @Barmar it doesn't; the duplicate does not use || at all – M.M May 26 '15 at 8:04
  • Ahh, they're identical except that the first && has been changed to ||. – Barmar May 26 '15 at 8:06
  • Operator precedence != order of evaluation && left-to-right associativity != left-to-right evaluation. – Lundin May 26 '15 at 8:34
2

|| and && are short circuit operators. If the final result is evaluated from the left operand, right operand is not evaluated.

++i ||  /* Evaluate ++i which is -2, so the result of expression is 1 */
  ++j && ++k;  /* No need to evaluated this */
  • This is not guaranteed and is specific to compiler implementation. – Atmocreations May 26 '15 at 7:52
  • 5
    No, this is guaranteed by the specs – Mohit Jain May 26 '15 at 7:53
  • @Atmocreations logical operators in C-like languages are always shortcircuited by standard – phuclv May 26 '15 at 7:55
  • 2
    @Atmocreations 6.5.13/4 "...the && operator guarantees left-to-right evaluation; if the second operand is evaluated, there is a sequence point between the evaluations of the first and second operands. If the first operand compares equal to 0, the second operand is not evaluated." The standard can't really be more clear than that. – Lundin May 26 '15 at 8:36

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