There have been many MaltParser and/or NLTK related questions:

Now, there's a more stabilized version of MaltParser API in NLTK: https://github.com/nltk/nltk/pull/944 but there are issues when it comes to parsing multiple sentences at the same time.

Parsing one sentence at a time seems fine:

_path_to_maltparser = '/home/alvas/maltparser-1.8/dist/maltparser-1.8/'
_path_to_model= '/home/alvas/engmalt.linear-1.7.mco'     
>>> mp = MaltParser(path_to_maltparser=_path_to_maltparser, model=_path_to_model)
>>> sent = 'I shot an elephant in my pajamas'.split()
>>> sent2 = 'Time flies like banana'.split()
>>> print(mp.parse_one(sent).tree())
(pajamas (shot I) an elephant in my)

But parsing a list of sentences doesn't return a DependencyGraph object:

_path_to_maltparser = '/home/alvas/maltparser-1.8/dist/maltparser-1.8/'
_path_to_model= '/home/alvas/engmalt.linear-1.7.mco'     
>>> mp = MaltParser(path_to_maltparser=_path_to_maltparser, model=_path_to_model)
>>> sent = 'I shot an elephant in my pajamas'.split()
>>> sent2 = 'Time flies like banana'.split()
>>> print(mp.parse_one(sent).tree())
(pajamas (shot I) an elephant in my)
>>> print(next(mp.parse_sents([sent,sent2])))
<listiterator object at 0x7f0a2e4d3d90> 
>>> print(next(next(mp.parse_sents([sent,sent2]))))
[{u'address': 0,
  u'ctag': u'TOP',
  u'deps': [2],
  u'feats': None,
  u'lemma': None,
  u'rel': u'TOP',
  u'tag': u'TOP',
  u'word': None},
 {u'address': 1,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 2,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'I'},
 {u'address': 2,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [1, 11],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 0,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'null',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'shot'},
 {u'address': 3,
  u'ctag': u'AT',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'AT',
  u'word': u'an'},
 {u'address': 4,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'elephant'},
 {u'address': 5,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'in'},
 {u'address': 6,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'my'},
 {u'address': 7,
  u'ctag': u'NNS',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NNS',
  u'word': u'pajamas'},
 {u'address': 8,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'Time'},
 {u'address': 9,
  u'ctag': u'NNS',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NNS',
  u'word': u'flies'},
 {u'address': 10,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 11,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'nn',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'like'},
 {u'address': 11,
  u'ctag': u'NN',
  u'deps': [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10],
  u'feats': u'_',
  u'head': 2,
  u'lemma': u'_',
  u'rel': u'dep',
  u'tag': u'NN',
  u'word': u'banana'}]

Why is that using parse_sents() don't return an iterable of parse_one?

I could however, just get lazy and do:

_path_to_maltparser = '/home/alvas/maltparser-1.8/dist/maltparser-1.8/'
_path_to_model= '/home/alvas/engmalt.linear-1.7.mco'     
>>> mp = MaltParser(path_to_maltparser=_path_to_maltparser, model=_path_to_model)
>>> sent1 = 'I shot an elephant in my pajamas'.split()
>>> sent2 = 'Time flies like banana'.split()
>>> sentences = [sent1, sent2]
>>> for sent in sentences:
>>> ...    print(mp.parse_one(sent).tree())

But this is not the solution I'm looking for. My question is how to answer why doesn't the parse_sent() return an iterable of parse_one(). and how could it be fixed in the NLTK code?


After @NikitaAstrakhantsev answered, I've tried it outputs a parse tree now but it seems to be confused and puts both sentences into one before parsing it.

# Initialize a MaltParser object with a pre-trained model.
mp = MaltParser(path_to_maltparser=path_to_maltparser, model=path_to_model) 
sent = 'I shot an elephant in my pajamas'.split()
sent2 = 'Time flies like banana'.split()
# Parse a single sentence.
print(mp.parse_one(sent).tree())
print(next(next(mp.parse_sents([sent,sent2]))).tree())

[out]:

(pajamas (shot I) an elephant in my)
(shot I (banana an elephant in my pajamas Time flies like))

From the code it seems to be doing something weird: https://github.com/nltk/nltk/blob/develop/nltk/parse/api.py#L45

Why is it that the parser abstract class in NLTK is swooshing two sentences into one before parsing? Am I calling the parse_sents() incorrectly? If so, what is the correct way to call parse_sents()?

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

As I see in your code samples, you don't call tree() in this line

>>> print(next(next(mp.parse_sents([sent,sent2])))) 

while you do call tree() in all cases with parse_one().

Otherwise I don't see the reason why it could happen: parse_one() method of ParserI isn't overridden in MaltParser and everything it does is simply calling parse_sents() of MaltParser, see the code.

Upd: The line you're talking about isn't called, because parse_sents() is overridden in MaltParser and is directly called.

The only guess I have now is that java lib maltparser doesn't work correctly with input file containing several sentences (I mean this block - where java is run). Maybe original malt parser has changed the format and now it is not '\n\n'. Unfortunately, I can't run this code by myself, because maltparser.org is down for the second day. I checked that the input file has expected format (sentences are separated by double endline), so it is very unlikely that python wrapper merges sentences.

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