3

I have some code written in C#. I am trying to write some generic code that I can reuse. My actual code is more complicated. However, the code is question looks like the following:

public async Task<T> ExecuteQueryAsync<T>(string sql)
{
  var results = default(T);
  using (var database = new SqlConnection("[ConnectionString]"))
  {
    database.Open();
    results = await database.QueryAsync<T>(sql);                        
  }
  return results;
}

When I build my project, I get a compile-time error that says:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable<T>' to 'T'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

I do not fully understand why I'm getting this error. I intend to call it in a manner like this:

Adapter adapter = new Adapter();
var results = await adapter.ExecuteQueryAsync<IEnumerable<Customer>>("SELECT * FROM Customer");

In the above, wouldn't T be an IEnumerable<T>? If that's the case, I do not understand why I'm getting this type conversion error at compile-time.

Thank you!

  • 3
    results has type T and database.QueryAsync<T>(sql) returns IEnumerable<T>. Just change result type to IEnumerable<T> I think that is what you really want. Default value has nothing to do with your problem. – Andrey May 26 '15 at 14:00
  • 1
    I know this is simplified code, but just to be sure... you really need to add a mechanism to this code to accept sql parameter data separately from the sql command string. Otherwise you're practically forcing yourself to write horribly insecure code. – Joel Coehoorn May 26 '15 at 14:03
5

Try something like this.

public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> ExecuteQueryAsync<T>(string sql)
{
  IEnumerable<T> results = Enumerable.Empty<T>();
  using (var database = new SqlConnection("[ConnectionString]"))
  {
    database.Open();
    results = await database.QueryAsync<T>(sql);                        
  }
  return results;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    methinks easy return await database.QueryAsync<T>(sql); without any variables – Grundy May 26 '15 at 14:04
  • true that would be equivalent. – Daniel A. White May 26 '15 at 14:04
  • 1
    @Grundy It's actually provably impossible for that value to be returned, so using null simply avoids getting an empty sequence. – Servy May 26 '15 at 14:15
  • 2
    @Grundy But it doesn't. You could never actually return null even if you used null. Again, it's a value that you can prove is never returned; what it is is irrelevant. Heck, you could just leave it uninitialized and not assign anything to it if you wanted. – Servy May 26 '15 at 14:24
  • 1
    Yes, @Servy is right. It is much better to leave it uninitialized before the using statement. So simply IEnumerable<T> results; with no assignment at the declaration. There is no point in setting it to anything (either null or some empty object) that will not be used. The compiler is happy with this approach. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 26 '15 at 14:27
3

In your ExecuteQueryAsync you not need it results variable, since you always rewrite it. So your function can be like this

public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> ExecuteQueryAsync<T>(string sql)
{
    using (var database = new SqlConnection("[ConnectionString]"))
    {
        database.Open();
        return await database.QueryAsync<T>(sql);                        
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

There are already good answers here, but I wanted to make sure we had one that supports safe query parameterization. The original code forces you to write incredibly insecure code that will result in your app getting hacked. This allows you to avoid that:

public async Task<IEnumerable<T>> ExecuteQueryAsync<T>(string sql, dynamic Parameters = null)
{
  IEnumerable<T> results;
  using (var database = new SqlConnection("[ConnectionString]"))
  {
    database.Open();
    results = await database.QueryAsync<T>(sql, Parameters);                        
  }
  return results;
}

Then you might call it like this:

Adapter adapter = new Adapter();
var results = await adapter.ExecuteQueryAsync<IEnumerable<Customer>>(
        "SELECT * FROM Customer WHERE Sales >= @Sales", 
        new {Sales = 500.0m});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    methinks it same as @Daniel answer, or i something missed? – Grundy May 26 '15 at 14:15
  • @Grundy It adds support for parameterized queries. – Joel Coehoorn May 26 '15 at 14:17
  • 1
    Thank you for removing the meaningless initialization = Enumerable.Empty<T>() that you had copy-pasted from another answer at first (see comments at Daniel A. White's answer). – Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 26 '15 at 14:32
  • 1
    @JeppeStigNielsen Why even leave it uninitialized when you can trivially remove any need for it in the first place. Doing so improves the readability of the code pretty dramatically. – Servy May 26 '15 at 14:34
  • 1
    @Servy Because of the "my actual code is more complicated" statement in the question. There may be something else going on where he needs that variable in the method. – Joel Coehoorn May 26 '15 at 14:36

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