22

In order to prevent from context switching, I want to create a big loop to serve both the network connections and some routines.

Here's the implementation for normal functions:

import asyncio
import time


def hello_world(loop):
    print('Hello World')
    loop.call_later(1, hello_world, loop)

def good_evening(loop):
    print('Good Evening')
    loop.call_later(1, good_evening, loop)

print('step: asyncio.get_event_loop()')
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()

print('step: loop.call_soon(hello_world, loop)')
loop.call_soon(hello_world, loop)
print('step: loop.call_soon(good_evening, loop)')
loop.call_soon(good_evening, loop)

try:
    # Blocking call interrupted by loop.stop()
    print('step: loop.run_forever()')
    loop.run_forever()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass
finally:
    print('step: loop.close()')
    loop.close()

Here's the implementation for coroutines:

import asyncio


@asyncio.coroutine
def hello_world():
    while True:
        yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
        print('Hello World')

@asyncio.coroutine
def good_evening():
    while True:
        yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
        print('Good Evening')

print('step: asyncio.get_event_loop()')
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
try:
    print('step: loop.run_until_complete()')
    loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.wait([
        hello_world(),
        good_evening()
    ]))
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass
finally:
    print('step: loop.close()')
    loop.close()

And the mixed one:

import asyncio
import time


def hello_world(loop):
    print('Hello World')
    loop.call_later(1, hello_world, loop)

def good_evening(loop):
    print('Good Evening')
    loop.call_later(1, good_evening, loop)

@asyncio.coroutine
def hello_world_coroutine():
    while True:
        yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
        print('Hello World Coroutine')

@asyncio.coroutine
def good_evening_coroutine():
    while True:
        yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
        print('Good Evening Coroutine')

print('step: asyncio.get_event_loop()')
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()

print('step: loop.call_soon(hello_world, loop)')
loop.call_soon(hello_world, loop)
print('step: loop.call_soon(good_evening, loop)')
loop.call_soon(good_evening, loop)
print('step: asyncio.async(hello_world_coroutine)')
asyncio.async(hello_world_coroutine())
print('step: asyncio.async(good_evening_coroutine)')
asyncio.async(good_evening_coroutine())

try:
    loop.run_forever()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass
finally:
    print('step: loop.close()')
    loop.close()

As you see, each coroutine function has a while loop surrounded. How can I make it like the normal one? I.e. when it is done, call itself after the given delay time, but not just put a loop there.

1
  • 1
    Why do you not like a loop? The code with loop is pretty obvious and easy to read. May 26, 2015 at 18:25

4 Answers 4

21

If you really want to eliminate the while-loop from the coroutines (I'm not sure why you feel that's necessary; it's the most natural way to do what you're trying to do), you can use asyncio.async (or asyncio.ensure_future on Python 3.4.4+) to schedule the coroutine to run again on the next event loop iteration:

import asyncio

@asyncio.coroutine
def hello_world():
    yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
    print('Hello World')
    asyncio.async(hello_world())

@asyncio.coroutine
def good_evening():
    yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
    print('Good Evening')
    asyncio.async(good_evening())

print('step: asyncio.get_event_loop()')
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
try:
    print('step: loop.run_until_complete()')
    asyncio.async(hello_world())
    asyncio.async(good_evening())
    loop.run_forever()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass
finally:
    print('step: loop.close()')
    loop.close()

Note that you have to switch back to using loop.run_forever() if you do this, since hello_world/good_evening will exit immediately after printing now.

0
3
# asyncio_coroutine_forever.py

import asyncio

async def hello_world():

    await asyncio.sleep(1)
    print('Hello World')
    await good_evening()


async def good_evening():

    await asyncio.sleep(1)
    print('Good Evening')
    await hello_world()


loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()

try:

    loop.run_until_complete(hello_world())
    loop.run_until_complete(good_evening())
    loop.run_forever()

finally:

    print('closing event loop')
    loop.close()
2
  • That looks much better. Thank you Morten. Tested that code with Python 3.6.1. Mar 23, 2017 at 13:56
  • 1
    Althouh this will eventually run out of stack frames because of the await. It'd be better to await asyncio.sleep(1.0) add the coros as futures to the event loop.
    – Goodies
    Mar 30, 2017 at 3:24
1
import asyncio


@asyncio.coroutine
def hello_world_coroutine():
    yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
    print('Hello World Coroutine')
    yield from hello_world_coroutine()

@asyncio.coroutine
def good_evening_coroutine():
    yield from asyncio.sleep(1)
    print('Good Evening Coroutine')
    yield from good_evening_coroutine()

print('step: asyncio.get_event_loop()')
loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
try:
    print('step: loop.run_until_complete()')
    loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.wait([
        hello_world_coroutine(),
        good_evening_coroutine()
    ]))
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    pass
finally:
    print('step: loop.close()')
    loop.close()

UPD

This code would reach the maximum recursion depth. Might because Python has no tail call optimization. Leave the code here as a wrong example.

2
  • I won't mark this as the answer right away. Wait some time for better solution. May 26, 2015 at 16:01
  • 1
    This actually won't work - eventually you'll reach the maximum recursion depth and the program will crash.
    – dano
    May 26, 2015 at 19:14
0

Did you actually try to run the three examples you gave? The difference in behaviour is pretty obvious.

Since you never said what you expect, there’s not telling what is right and what is not. All three implementations could be right or wrong. I can tell you what behaviour each implementation has, and why it has such behaviour; only you know whether it is correct.


In the second example (yield from asyncio.sleep(1)), the two coroutines are run concurrently. This means that each will execute on their own; hello_world prints Hello World every second, and good_evening prints Good Evening every second.

The other two examples both use time.sleep(1), which is blocking. This means that when the first function (whichever that is; let’s say it’s hello_world) reaches time.sleep(1), the whole program will hang for one second. This means that when hello_world sleeps, good_evening cannot run either, and vice versa.

The program executes like this:

  1. The loop is entered.
  2. The loop calls hello_world.
  3. time.sleep(1) in hello_world is reached. The program sleeps for one second.
  4. Hello World printed.
  5. hello_world yields.
  6. The loop calls good_evening.
  7. Good Evening printed.
  8. time.sleep(1) in good_evening is reached. The program sleeps for one second.
  9. good_evening yields.
  10. Go to 2.

Therefore both Hello World and Good Evening appear every two seconds, because there are two time.sleep(1) calls between each print. You would easily notice that if you run the two examples.

6
  • Thank you @uranusjr. I wrote the codes and also ran it. I know the flow of it and also know sleep would block the thread and yield from async. not. What I am not sure is the way is the correct or pythonic way. I know the concept of coroutine but haven't used it before. So far I didn't see other people write the same code for this purpose. They use one of normal function and coroutine but not both. May 26, 2015 at 15:01
  • Top-level coroutines do not make an async program; a program is async only if you use async APIs like asyncio.sleep. You can use blocking APIs inside coroutines (e.g. time.sleep), but blocking APIs block the whole program, including other coroutines. Whether it is acceptable depends on your use case.
    – uranusjr
    May 26, 2015 at 15:35
  • Thank you again. I've updated the question and the code. Replace call_soon with call_later and remove time.sleep(). May 26, 2015 at 15:37
  • The updated examples make sense to me. Now example 1 and 2 should behave identically, and example 3 is also truly async.
    – uranusjr
    May 26, 2015 at 15:41
  • Thank you @uranusjr. But what I want to know is how to emit the while loop. May 26, 2015 at 15:44

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