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Need to escape / in javascript .split() function but cannot seem to figure out!

input -> string "07777/25555,00255" or any of 0777/2555 0777,2555

output -> array {07777,25555,00255}

var p = item.gdp.split(/ , | \//);

Not really good with regex!

  • \/ is the correct way to escape /, but what are you trying to split exactly? – Eric Leibenguth May 26 '15 at 18:25
  • Are you saying that you want the result of 0777/2555 0777,2555 to be ["0777", "25555", "00255"] ? That will take more than a split, if you're coalescing the common part. – Stephen P May 26 '15 at 18:37
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What this does is split on either " , " or " /" (note the space characters: space comma space and space forward slash). Your regular expression is absolutely fine if that's what you're intending to replace on.

Here's a Regexper visualisation:

Example


Update

There are no spaces in your string at all, so you need to remove those:

item.gdp.split(/,|\//);

With this, your result will be:

["07777", "25555", "00255"]

A more practical regular expression to use though would be /[,\/] - the square brackets will match on any character held within them.

  • 1
    @Downvoter Care to explain the downvote? – James Donnelly May 26 '15 at 18:31
  • Yep. Not working unfortunately. – Fabrizio Mazzoni May 26 '15 at 18:33
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    You don't need the g global for a split - it will already split on each occurrence of the given pattern. – Stephen P May 26 '15 at 18:33
  • @StephenP good point! – James Donnelly May 26 '15 at 18:34
  • @FabrizioMazzoni are you sure item.gdp contains "07777/25555,00255"? – James Donnelly May 26 '15 at 18:36
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var item={gdp:"07777/25555,00255"};
var p = item.gdp.split(/[,/]/);
document.write(p[0] + "<br>" + p[1] + "<br>" + p[2]);
07777

25555

00255

  • Can you include the regex delimiter in its body without escaping it? – user557597 May 26 '15 at 18:41
  • @sln Sure can i – Peter Rader May 26 '15 at 18:43
  • That's new to me. Unusual code parsing rules. Its like var p = "hello";world"; – user557597 May 26 '15 at 18:46
  • Yea, i guess its the opening [ who let javascript expect a closing ]. – Peter Rader May 26 '15 at 18:47
  • JS is so jacked up. – user557597 May 26 '15 at 18:50
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Here's one

split(/\s*[,\/]\s*|\s+/);
1

If you are splitting on only comma and slash as in your first string "07777/25555,00255"
you can simply split on the character class containing those two characters [,/]
Within a character class the slash does not need to be escaped, so the resulting statement would be
var p = item.gdp.split(/[,/]/);

If you also want to split on space, as in your other example 0777/2555 0777,2555 simply add space to the character class:
var p = item.gdp.split(/[, /]/);

or to split on any whitespace (space, tab, etc.) use the predefined \s:
var p = item.gdp.split(/[,\s/]/);

Further, you can collapse multiple whitespace, but then you need to go beyond a simple character class. Compare...

var str="07777/25555,00255     0777,3444";

// split on white, comma, or slash. multiple spaces causes multiple results
str.split(/[\s,/]/)
// -> ["07777", "25555", "00255", "", "", "", "", "0777", "3444"]

// split on multiple whitespace, OR on comma or slash
str.split(/\s+|[,/]/)
// -> ["07777", "25555", "00255", "0777", "3444"]
  • The last regex is not quite right. Because of the alternation precedence, "assdf /asdf" will be split into three. – user557597 May 26 '15 at 18:57
  • @sln That is true, but "assdf,/asdf" will also do that. I only even mentioned collapsing whitespace because it comes up more often. If you have something like "qwer,,zcxv" it's pretty likely that you want the empty field #2 to be represented in the result, while "qwer asfd zxcv" is more likely to be 3 fields separated by multiple spaces-and/or-tabs. – Stephen P May 26 '15 at 19:04
  • Yeah, its an odd case. I do think though, that a stand alone whitespaces would qualify as a hard delimiter, while within an adjacent sequence its soft, consumed as part of a single [,/] Just my analysis if I were doing it. – user557597 May 26 '15 at 19:08
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input.split(/[\/\s,]+/)

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