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I was trying to take out all emoji chars out of a string (like a sanitizer). But I cannot find a complete set of emoji values.

What is the complete set of emoji chars' UTF16 values?

4
  • unicode.org is the definitive guide for everything UTF related.
    – Jongware
    May 26 '15 at 22:43
  • 6
    And if you read the emoji FAQ, it says: "The emoji are spread throughout many blocks of Unicode", which is evident in the full emoji chart, so you can't use a single range check to filter them out, you will have to check for multiple ranges and even specific values. May 26 '15 at 22:53
  • Thanks, Jongware and Remy. But I was just curious that is there a list of ranges that I can directly use. Because there are more then 1,000 emoji chars, it takes a while to figure out the ranges from the chart
    – SL988
    May 27 '15 at 0:17
  • You are approaching your problem incorrectly. Emoji/unicode is very complex, and single emoji character may be composed of multiple utf16 codepoints. What is the end result you want to achieve? Is it that your end string contains only alpha-numberic characters? I think it would it be easier for you to define allowed character set and enumerate/filter your string using the language/functions of your choise.
    – Mindaugas
    Jul 26 '18 at 7:37
15

The Unicode standard's Unicode® Technical Report #51 includes a list of emoji (emoji-data.txt):

...
21A9 ;  text ;  L1 ;    none ;  j   # V1.1 (↩) LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH HOOK
21AA ;  text ;  L1 ;    none ;  j   # V1.1 (↪) RIGHTWARDS ARROW WITH HOOK
231A ;  emoji ; L1 ;    none ;  j   # V1.1 (⌚) WATCH
231B ;  emoji ; L1 ;    none ;  j   # V1.1 (⌛) HOURGLASS
...

I believe you would want to remove each character listed in this document which had a Default_Emoji_Style of emoji.

There is no way, other than reference to a definition list like this, to identify the emoji characters in Unicode. As the reference to the FAQ says, they are spread throughout different blocks.

2
3

I have composed list based on Joe's and Doctor.Who's answers:

U+00A9, U+00AE, U+203C, U+2049, U+20E3, U+2122, U+2139, U+2194-2199, U+21A9-21AA, U+231A, U+231B, U+2328, U+23CF, U+23E9-23F3, U+23F8-23FA, U+24C2, U+25AA, U+25AB, U+25B6, U+25C0, U+25FB-25FE, U+2600-27EF, U+2934, U+2935, U+2B00-2BFF, U+3030, U+303D, U+3297, U+3299, U+1F000-1F02F, U+1F0A0-1F0FF, U+1F100-1F64F, U+1F680-1F6FF, U+1F910-1F96B, U+1F980-1F9E0
1
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unicode-range: U+0080-02AF, U+0300-03FF, U+0600-06FF, U+0C00-0C7F, U+1DC0-1DFF, U+1E00-1EFF, U+2000-209F, U+20D0-214F, U+2190-23FF, U+2460-25FF, U+2600-27EF, U+2900-29FF, U+2B00-2BFF, U+2C60-2C7F, U+2E00-2E7F, U+3000-303F, U+A490-A4CF, U+E000-F8FF, U+FE00-FE0F, U+FE30-FE4F, U+1F000-1F02F, U+1F0A0-1F0FF, U+1F100-1F64F, U+1F680-1F6FF, U+1F910-1F96B, U+1F980-1F9E0;
2
  • 6
    What's your source? Would love to know to be able to keep this up to date.
    – Solo
    Apr 5 '19 at 2:09
  • 1
    This list appears too be too broad. E.g. 0300-03FF range contains diacritic sings, Greek letters, etc, but no emoji. Dec 25 '19 at 12:25
2

Emoji ranges are updated for every new version of Unicode Emoji. Ranges below are correct for version 14.0

Here is my gist for an advanced version of this code.

def is_contains_emoji(p_string_in_unicode):
    """
    Instead of searching all chars of a text in a emoji lookup dictionary this function just
    checks whether any char in the text is in unicode emoji range
    It is much faster than a dictionary lookup for a large text
    However it only tells whether a text contains an emoji. It does not return the found emojis
    """
    range_min = ord(u'\U0001F300') # 127744
    range_max = ord(u"\U0001FAF6") # 129782
    range_min_2 = 126980
    range_max_2 = 127569
    range_min_3 = 169
    range_max_3 = 174
    range_min_4 = 8205
    range_max_4 = 12953
    if p_string_in_unicode:
        for a_char in p_string_in_unicode:
            char_code = ord(a_char)
            if range_min <= char_code <= range_max:
                # or range_min_2 <= char_code <= range_max_2 or range_min_3 <= char_code <= range_max_3 or range_min_4 <= char_code <= range_max_4:
                return True
            elif range_min_2 <= char_code <= range_max_2:
                return True
            elif range_min_3 <= char_code <= range_max_3:
                return True
            elif range_min_4 <= char_code <= range_max_4:
                return True
        return False
    else:
        return False
-2

If you only deal with English character and emoji character I think it is doable. First convert your string to UTF-16 characters, then check each characters whose value is bigger than 0x0xD800 (for emoji it is actually >=0xD836) should be emoji.

This is because "The Unicode standard permanently reserves the code point values between 0xD800 to 0xDFFF for UTF-16 encoding of the high and low surrogates" and of course English characters (and many other character won't fall in this range)

But because emoji code point starts from U1F300 their UFT-16 value actually fall in this range.

Check here for a quick reference for emoji UFT-16 value, if you don't bother to do it yourself.

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  • 2
    Hi Qiulang, Thank you for your answer while I don't think it is correct. A simple counter example is 0x2600 which does not fall in the range you provided but is an emoji. Plus, I'm not only deal with english but multi-languages.
    – SL988
    Sep 10 '15 at 23:16
  • Yes I know that emoji. But majority of emoji characters fall the range I said. Only a couple of them not, it should be easy to deal with Sep 11 '15 at 1:57
  • Check here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emoji, only a few which is called Dingbats block Sep 11 '15 at 1:58
  • 1
    As you can see, that is not a complete list on the wiki page you provided. So I don't think it is 'easy to deal with'. There are other blocks that do not fall in the range you mentioned but are emoji blocks. I just wanted to know if there is a complete list or some rules.
    – SL988
    Sep 11 '15 at 23:33

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